Annointed?

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    ‘When dealing with the complex issue of poverty, radio and TV anchors and commentators should be equipped with a deeper understanding of the spiritual issues instead of being confined to the tired and overused advise of sorts.’

    EVANGELICAL Christians allied with US President Donald Trump should have known better that religion and politics don’t mix. The Bible teaches that man should trust God more than any man, which is a complicated issue for a world with many religions.

    Trump’s historic act recognizing Jerusalem as the new capital of Israel was a momentous event for many evangelicals, not only in the US but in the rest of the world. They claimed that Trump had an “annointing” in the fulfillment of Biblical prophecies and should, therefore, be supported.

    At the height of the riots triggered by the killing of George Floyd and after ordering the violent dispersal of rallyists in front of the White House, Trump pulled off a pho-op, displaying a Bible that was an undeniable attempt to align his incendiary racist views with its passages. The rightist Christians forget that even some great men of the Bible such as Saul and Samson had lost their spiritual annointing after the Spirit of God had left them due to their wicked and ungodly ways.

    God called “my servant” the Babylonian king Nebuchadnezzar who worshiped the pagan god Maduk and who defeated the armies of Israel and took its young people as captives.

    Among them were Daniel, the prophet, and his three friends. Jeremiah 27:6 says, “Now I will give all your countries into the hands of my servant Nebuchadnezzar king of Babylon; I will make even the wild animals subject to him.” Eventually, Nebuchadnezzar would be ravaged with illnesses, lose his throne and co-habit with animals.

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    When dealing with the complex issue of poverty, radio and TV anchors and commentators should be equipped with a deeper understanding of the spiritual issues instead of being confined to the tired and overused advise of sorts. That the poor should accept their poverty, that their children should finish school and that the government has been providing livelihood and other forms of assistance. The ugly reality that the very few who saw their children through college has endured a real struggle of almost sleepless backbreaking work and other sacrifices.

    Psalm 23 is such an enlightening truth about God’s provisions. Tom Ledding, the International Treasurer of the Full Gospel Businessmen’s Fellowship International, stresses that “financial prosperity is governed by God’s love (which implies obedience to Him) and compassion for one’s fellowman”. David’s most well-known psalm starts with “The Lord i my Shepherd; I shall not be in want.””We are the cherished objects of His divine love and fatherly care. “’I shall not be in want’ means we will not lack anything necessary for our well-being.” More next time.