Spreading hope through art

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    The onslaught of the pandemic in many countries constantly paints a sorry picture of how bad life is for a lot of people. It goes without saying that millions struggle each day to make ends meet and stay alive. People are looking, yearning, wanting for something to hold on to, for relief, solace, inspiration, reassurance and comfort. Or something that will remind them that there is hope and God is in control and at work even in this season of darkness.

    Kristine Soguilon-Lim, a true artist in the strictest sense of the word, is returning to the art scene after years of sabbatical. This 2020, through her best work yet, she immortalizes some of the critically endangered species in the Philippines in a one-woman show on Oct. 16 – 22 at the Diamond Hotel in Roxas, Blvd., Manila.

    Knowing and believing that her crafts can be used as effective tools to not at least temporarily escape from the misery, fear, and despair of many people but more importantly to dramatize the fact that hope still remains.

    She wants to use her God-given talents not to propagandize her interest but to embolden everyone and remind them of their purpose and assert that God is still in control even in times when things seem to only get worse before they get better.

    Some of her pieces in the exhibit posit optimism, which view man or nature in its totality within a wide ecological spectrum. “The state of being endangered unlocks the beginning of the end but it is also our light of hope; it is not yet too late. We are here to reflect, change and act. Perhaps this is the moment why we have been created. We are here because we must and we can turn things around,” she quips.

    “The pieces we are showcasing are heart stirring yet thought-provoking mnemonics of who we are, where we stand and what we are going through,” she exclaims.

    Proceeds from the paintings and the actual Aesca products (where the artworks will be translated and reproduced) will be used to support those in the frontlines of this battle and the displaced workers due to the pandemic through missions of JKL Foundation Inc.