July 22, 2018, 10:46 am
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1 Philippine Peso = 0.0687 UAE Dirham
1 Philippine Peso = 2.01833 Albanian Lek
1 Philippine Peso = 0.03442 Neth Antilles Guilder
1 Philippine Peso = 0.51646 Argentine Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 0.02528 Australian Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.0333 Aruba Florin
1 Philippine Peso = 0.03741 Barbados Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 1.57108 Bangladesh Taka
1 Philippine Peso = 0.03151 Bulgarian Lev
1 Philippine Peso = 0.00707 Bahraini Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 32.75309 Burundi Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01871 Bermuda Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.02527 Brunei Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.12832 Bolivian Boliviano
1 Philippine Peso = 0.07203 Brazilian Real
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01871 Bahamian Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 1.27899 Bhutan Ngultrum
1 Philippine Peso = 0.19255 Botswana Pula
1 Philippine Peso = 374.4856 Belarus Ruble
1 Philippine Peso = 0.03737 Belize Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.02464 Canadian Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01868 Swiss Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 12.20576 Chilean Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 0.12563 Chinese Yuan
1 Philippine Peso = 53.5578 Colombian Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 10.55649 Costa Rica Colon
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01871 Cuban Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 1.77142 Cape Verde Escudo
1 Philippine Peso = 0.41506 Czech Koruna
1 Philippine Peso = 3.32024 Djibouti Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 0.11972 Danish Krone
1 Philippine Peso = 0.93303 Dominican Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 2.19981 Algerian Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.25129 Estonian Kroon
1 Philippine Peso = 0.33389 Egyptian Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 0.51106 Ethiopian Birr
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01606 Euro
1 Philippine Peso = 0.03917 Fiji Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01429 Falkland Islands Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01431 British Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 0.08962 Ghanaian Cedi
1 Philippine Peso = 0.88982 Gambian Dalasi
1 Philippine Peso = 168.66816 Guinea Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 0.14005 Guatemala Quetzal
1 Philippine Peso = 3.88103 Guyana Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.1468 Hong Kong Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.44747 Honduras Lempira
1 Philippine Peso = 0.1187 Croatian Kuna
1 Philippine Peso = 1.26057 Haiti Gourde
1 Philippine Peso = 5.20183 Hungarian Forint
1 Philippine Peso = 269.36027 Indonesian Rupiah
1 Philippine Peso = 0.06796 Israeli Shekel
1 Philippine Peso = 1.28159 Indian Rupee
1 Philippine Peso = 22.25963 Iraqi Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 813.69248 Iran Rial
1 Philippine Peso = 1.99588 Iceland Krona
1 Philippine Peso = 2.43547 Jamaican Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01325 Jordanian Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 2.11107 Japanese Yen
1 Philippine Peso = 1.8771 Kenyan Shilling
1 Philippine Peso = 1.27484 Kyrgyzstan Som
1 Philippine Peso = 75.70146 Cambodia Riel
1 Philippine Peso = 7.90311 Comoros Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 16.83502 North Korean Won
1 Philippine Peso = 21.15413 Korean Won
1 Philippine Peso = 0.00566 Kuwaiti Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01534 Cayman Islands Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 6.4508 Kazakhstan Tenge
1 Philippine Peso = 157.22035 Lao Kip
1 Philippine Peso = 28.15189 Lebanese Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 2.98915 Sri Lanka Rupee
1 Philippine Peso = 3.00412 Liberian Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.24822 Lesotho Loti
1 Philippine Peso = 0.05703 Lithuanian Lita
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01161 Latvian Lat
1 Philippine Peso = 0.02573 Libyan Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.17723 Moroccan Dirham
1 Philippine Peso = 0.31076 Moldovan Leu
1 Philippine Peso = 0.98373 Macedonian Denar
1 Philippine Peso = 26.78638 Myanmar Kyat
1 Philippine Peso = 45.80995 Mongolian Tugrik
1 Philippine Peso = 0.15122 Macau Pataca
1 Philippine Peso = 6.64048 Mauritania Ougulya
1 Philippine Peso = 0.64347 Mauritius Rupee
1 Philippine Peso = 0.29125 Maldives Rufiyaa
1 Philippine Peso = 13.40105 Malawi Kwacha
1 Philippine Peso = 0.35353 Mexican Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 0.07589 Malaysian Ringgit
1 Philippine Peso = 0.24819 Namibian Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 6.7153 Nigerian Naira
1 Philippine Peso = 0.58586 Nicaragua Cordoba
1 Philippine Peso = 0.15284 Norwegian Krone
1 Philippine Peso = 2.04293 Nepalese Rupee
1 Philippine Peso = 0.02753 New Zealand Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.00719 Omani Rial
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01871 Panama Balboa
1 Philippine Peso = 0.06114 Peruvian Nuevo Sol
1 Philippine Peso = 0.06073 Papua New Guinea Kina
1 Philippine Peso = 1 Philippine Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 2.39618 Pakistani Rupee
1 Philippine Peso = 0.0692 Polish Zloty
1 Philippine Peso = 106.97905 Paraguayan Guarani
1 Philippine Peso = 0.06809 Qatar Rial
1 Philippine Peso = 0.07472 Romanian New Leu
1 Philippine Peso = 1.18 Russian Rouble
1 Philippine Peso = 15.95267 Rwanda Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 0.07015 Saudi Arabian Riyal
1 Philippine Peso = 0.14747 Solomon Islands Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.25122 Seychelles Rupee
1 Philippine Peso = 0.33483 Sudanese Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 0.16573 Swedish Krona
1 Philippine Peso = 0.02554 Singapore Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.0143 St Helena Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 0.41538 Slovak Koruna
1 Philippine Peso = 153.38571 Sierra Leone Leone
1 Philippine Peso = 10.68088 Somali Shilling
1 Philippine Peso = 393.68313 Sao Tome Dobra
1 Philippine Peso = 0.16367 El Salvador Colon
1 Philippine Peso = 9.633 Syrian Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 0.24845 Swaziland Lilageni
1 Philippine Peso = 0.62252 Thai Baht
1 Philippine Peso = 0.04952 Tunisian Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.04351 Tongan paʻanga
1 Philippine Peso = 0.08966 Turkish Lira
1 Philippine Peso = 0.12587 Trinidad Tobago Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.57159 Taiwan Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 42.49906 Tanzanian Shilling
1 Philippine Peso = 0.49158 Ukraine Hryvnia
1 Philippine Peso = 69.56977 Ugandan Shilling
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01871 United States Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.58277 Uruguayan New Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 145.09914 Uzbekistan Sum
1 Philippine Peso = 2239.05724 Venezuelan Bolivar
1 Philippine Peso = 431.12608 Vietnam Dong
1 Philippine Peso = 2.04265 Vanuatu Vatu
1 Philippine Peso = 0.04883 Samoa Tala
1 Philippine Peso = 10.52881 CFA Franc (BEAC)
1 Philippine Peso = 0.05051 East Caribbean Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 10.52881 CFA Franc (BCEAO)
1 Philippine Peso = 1.90591 Pacific Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 4.67265 Yemen Riyal
1 Philippine Peso = 0.24818 South African Rand
1 Philippine Peso = 97.07258 Zambian Kwacha
1 Philippine Peso = 6.76955 Zimbabwe dollar

Safety first when riding through floods, monsoon rains

MY last ride through a storm was dry. At the advice of my friend Frank Castle, we hid with a couple of other rider friends in a hut by the hills of Daraitan, en route to Sampaloc in Tanay. That saved us from a deluge just down the road and a forthcoming mudslide.

With the possibility of flooding being the only predictable variable this rainy season, keeping away from the nasty waters is the best way to ride, waiting it out is the only truly safe solution versus riding in the flood prone streets of Manila.

Just today, with typhoon Maria lingering in the oceans just around the city, the day starts with bright sunlight and scorching heat. Four hours later, Mario pulls in the monsoon (after a yellow alert rain forecast), and a heavy downpour follows. And like in most places in the city (Metro Manila or otherwise) when the rains continue for more than an hour a flash flood usually occurs.

I maintain that while it’s safest to sit out from riding in the pouring rain and avoiding flooded roads, sometimes there’s no escaping it. When riding is a job or when you just need to get to that meeting, here is some practical advice, many come from adventure riding training, but a lot comes from seat time too. Here are some experience-based tips for riding through leptospirosis-laced floods of the metropolis.

WATCH AND LEARN. One of the first lessons in adventure riding is watch and learn. To do this you need to stop, get off your bike and inspect the road ahead. Look for tell tale signs of depth and of water current. Also look for potential hazards underwater like open manholes, speed bumps and potholes. Then observe other vehicles as they move through the flood.  

Knowing your bike helps. If you know the location of your engine’s air intake, then you can make an estimation of your survival in water. Reverting backs to stock air intake set up from an open filter will deliver immense benefits. If you have not yet done so, then now’s a good time to do it. If you don’t know where the airbox is, check it to now to know if it’s high enough above the water.

In many roads in Manila (like Taft Ave. and its side streets, or parts of the stretch of Osmeña Highway, the sides of the roads have deeper pools of water, or water gushing from underground sewers into the streets creating a strong water current from one side of the road to the other.

Some foolhardy motorcyclists may attempt to cross a flood, and of course if they bog down that is your indication to keep away. If they cross to the other side, consider it luck instead. If your gut feel tells you the water is too deep, forget the splashing. Just wait for it to subside.

STAND UP IF POSSIBLE AND JUST GO STRAIGHT. Riding through water because the unpredictability of the terrain and weather. Thus riding a flooded street is no different from riding through a water crossing in the Segovia River. Adventure or trail riding dictates standing on the footpegs when crossing obstacles. This allows better low-speed stability and balance.

Standing also offers two more benefits. First, is that balance is heightened when standing up. Humans are more stable standing up as we need to balance on two legs. Second, it offers a farther line of sight. This means that there is better estimation and calculation. Both factors combine to provide more control when you crawl ahead low speed. 

GO SLOW SMOOTHLY. For Instagram and Facebook throwing up a big splash by slicing through a puddle at high speed is quite spectacular. But in real life splashing may be dangerous to you and your bike, and other road users.

Riding into a thin layer of water at speed may cause aquaplaning, while hitting a deep body of water quickly can cause you to flip. This is because s deep enough water hazard can act like a brake or if deep enough, like crashing into a wall or water barrier. 

The bike will cut through the first few meters distance and when it hits a pooling of water, or a surge comes from the other side of the street. Both conditions can easily cause a rider to lose control or even thrown off his bike.

The rule for slow? Keep your revs as low as possible. Do not splash as water might enter the airbox. Also ride steadily standing up to keep the water’s bow wake below the height of the engine’s air intake. 

As mentioned earlier, it’s also best to stay off the sides and ride in the middle of the road 

KEEP MOVING AND DON’T BRAKE. If you ride an automatic, simply roll the throttle steady. On a manual transmission bike, keep to low gear. 

With that steady throttle maintain constant speed. Shifting could upset your balance, but in an automatic, sudden motions on the throttle might cause a change in pace. At times you might feel the tires kicking loose when contacting something underwater. 

In that case open the throttle a bit more to overcome the obstacle. 

Since water creates a natural friction, there is no need to brake as it may also upset the riding balance. Roll off the throttle smoothly if you need to slow down. And remember to keep off the front brake.

EXITING THE FLOOD. One big mistake newbie riders make is to gun the bike immediately after exiting the flood. Though the rule is to quickly exit the water obstacle, revving at an exit from the flood can cause more problems. 

First you need to drain water. Next you still have your brakes to worry about. Third your wheels as still water clogged and need to find their grip. Increase your speed gradually, and with the bike still moving, drag the rear brakes lightly to dry them and then both rear and front. Do not under any circumstance, in a low traction situation like a flood to dry the front brakes alone. 

SURVIVING “SUBMERGENCE.” What is you do stall and your bike tilts over. If you ride a lighter motorcycle, then chances are you are able to get it up quickly. As long as you did not modify the air intake system, most bikes with an underseat air box will survive with no water entering the carburetor—as long you as you kill the engine quickly enough.

Standing up on the bike gives this extra room to kill the engine before tipping over. Say you hit a pothole and cannot run across it for some reason, from an upright position you go to a sitting position before you laying the bike down into the water. If you do fall into the water without killing the engine, do so at the soonest time possible. 

An internal combustion engine relies on sucking air in to operate. The forces required to draw in this air is immense and the volumetric pressure can also suck in water. But water does not make for a good combustion mix. It cannot be compressed and won’t ignite, and in fact douse any attempt for it to be burned. Water in an engine at the right moment of combustion can cause catastrophic damage.

I remember after Typhoon Ondoy, dozens of friends came over to my backyard shop to ask for their bikes to be rebuilt. Many of them attempted to start their motorcycles (mostly scooters and 2-strokers) after it was submerged. That was difficult. In most cases, it required pulling out the spark plugs, cleaning the airbox and replacing the air filter and replacing the CDI and spark plugs as well as opening up the carbs. For the two-strokers, it required pushing out water from the combustion chamber. For valved engines, it required less work. The engines electricals needed to be completely dry before reinstallation

Riding through a flood isn’t an art or a test of skill. It requires a lot of common sense and balance. Most of the time it needs care for bike and self as well as a lot of logic to do. Also when you get home get a good bath, wash your feet well, and if in doubt get a leptospirosis shot.
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