April 26, 2017, 12:31 am
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1 Philippine Peso = 0.07374 UAE Dirham
1 Philippine Peso = 2.49799 Albanian Lek
1 Philippine Peso = 0.03594 Neth Antilles Guilder
1 Philippine Peso = 0.30869 Argentine Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 0.02653 Australian Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.03594 Aruba Florin
1 Philippine Peso = 0.04016 Barbados Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 1.66265 Bangladesh Taka
1 Philippine Peso = 0.0362 Bulgarian Lev
1 Philippine Peso = 0.00756 Bahraini Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 34.12309 Burundi Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 0.02008 Bermuda Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.02795 Brunei Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.13795 Bolivian Boliviano
1 Philippine Peso = 0.06279 Brazilian Real
1 Philippine Peso = 0.02008 Bahamian Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 1.29719 Bhutan Ngultrum
1 Philippine Peso = 0.20691 Botswana Pula
1 Philippine Peso = 402.00804 Belarus Ruble
1 Philippine Peso = 0.04012 Belize Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.02712 Canadian Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01999 Swiss Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 13.14779 Chilean Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 0.13823 Chinese Yuan
1 Philippine Peso = 57.61044 Colombian Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 11.0492 Costa Rica Colon
1 Philippine Peso = 0.02008 Cuban Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 2.03795 Cape Verde Escudo
1 Philippine Peso = 0.4955 Czech Koruna
1 Philippine Peso = 3.5743 Djibouti Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 0.13744 Danish Krone
1 Philippine Peso = 0.94578 Dominican Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 2.18602 Algerian Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.28902 Estonian Kroon
1 Philippine Peso = 0.36285 Egyptian Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 0.45783 Ethiopian Birr
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01847 Euro
1 Philippine Peso = 0.04172 Fiji Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01569 Falkland Islands Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 0.0157 British Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 0.08205 Ghanaian Cedi
1 Philippine Peso = 0.88052 Gambian Dalasi
1 Philippine Peso = 185.36145 Guinea Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 0.14727 Guatemala Quetzal
1 Philippine Peso = 4.10221 Guyana Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.15618 Hong Kong Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.46867 Honduras Lempira
1 Philippine Peso = 0.13713 Croatian Kuna
1 Philippine Peso = 1.33153 Haiti Gourde
1 Philippine Peso = 5.74598 Hungarian Forint
1 Philippine Peso = 267.38956 Indonesian Rupiah
1 Philippine Peso = 0.07311 Israeli Shekel
1 Philippine Peso = 1.29488 Indian Rupee
1 Philippine Peso = 23.71486 Iraqi Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 651.34539 Iran Rial
1 Philippine Peso = 2.16064 Iceland Krona
1 Philippine Peso = 2.5751 Jamaican Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01423 Jordanian Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 2.20343 Japanese Yen
1 Philippine Peso = 2.06888 Kenyan Shilling
1 Philippine Peso = 1.34789 Kyrgyzstan Som
1 Philippine Peso = 80.12048 Cambodia Riel
1 Philippine Peso = 9.2747 Comoros Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 18.07229 North Korean Won
1 Philippine Peso = 22.75743 Korean Won
1 Philippine Peso = 0.0061 Kuwaiti Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01647 Cayman Islands Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 6.25622 Kazakhstan Tenge
1 Philippine Peso = 164.67872 Lao Kip
1 Philippine Peso = 30.25502 Lebanese Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 3.05723 Sri Lanka Rupee
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1 Philippine Peso = 0.26094 Lesotho Loti
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1 Philippine Peso = 0.01246 Latvian Lat
1 Philippine Peso = 0.02828 Libyan Dinar
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1 Philippine Peso = 0.38584 Moldovan Leu
1 Philippine Peso = 1.13153 Macedonian Denar
1 Philippine Peso = 27.04819 Myanmar Kyat
1 Philippine Peso = 48.27309 Mongolian Tugrik
1 Philippine Peso = 0.16089 Macau Pataca
1 Philippine Peso = 7.14859 Mauritania Ougulya
1 Philippine Peso = 0.6994 Mauritius Rupee
1 Philippine Peso = 0.30622 Maldives Rufiyaa
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1 Philippine Peso = 0.37604 Mexican Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 0.08831 Malaysian Ringgit
1 Philippine Peso = 0.261 Namibian Dollar
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1 Philippine Peso = 0.59056 Nicaragua Cordoba
1 Philippine Peso = 0.17162 Norwegian Krone
1 Philippine Peso = 2.07129 Nepalese Rupee
1 Philippine Peso = 0.02861 New Zealand Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.00772 Omani Rial
1 Philippine Peso = 0.02008 Panama Balboa
1 Philippine Peso = 0.065 Peruvian Nuevo Sol
1 Philippine Peso = 0.06586 Papua New Guinea Kina
1 Philippine Peso = 1 Philippine Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 2.10141 Pakistani Rupee
1 Philippine Peso = 0.07841 Polish Zloty
1 Philippine Peso = 110.69879 Paraguayan Guarani
1 Philippine Peso = 0.07311 Qatar Rial
1 Philippine Peso = 0.08354 Romanian New Leu
1 Philippine Peso = 1.11942 Russian Rouble
1 Philippine Peso = 16.43896 Rwanda Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 0.07529 Saudi Arabian Riyal
1 Philippine Peso = 0.15744 Solomon Islands Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.27046 Seychelles Rupee
1 Philippine Peso = 0.13372 Sudanese Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 0.17781 Swedish Krona
1 Philippine Peso = 0.02796 Singapore Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01569 St Helena Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 0.4459 Slovak Koruna
1 Philippine Peso = 149.5984 Sierra Leone Leone
1 Philippine Peso = 10.98394 Somali Shilling
1 Philippine Peso = 452.80121 Sao Tome Dobra
1 Philippine Peso = 0.17514 El Salvador Colon
1 Philippine Peso = 10.34096 Syrian Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 0.26104 Swaziland Lilageni
1 Philippine Peso = 0.68916 Thai Baht
1 Philippine Peso = 0.05006 Tunisian Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.04645 Tongan paʻanga
1 Philippine Peso = 0.07169 Turkish Lira
1 Philippine Peso = 0.13453 Trinidad Tobago Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.60745 Taiwan Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 44.77912 Tanzanian Shilling
1 Philippine Peso = 0.53434 Ukraine Hryvnia
1 Philippine Peso = 72.53012 Ugandan Shilling
1 Philippine Peso = 0.02008 United States Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.57068 Uruguayan New Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 74.29719 Uzbekistan Sum
1 Philippine Peso = 0.2003 Venezuelan Bolivar
1 Philippine Peso = 456.10443 Vietnam Dong
1 Philippine Peso = 2.17892 Vanuatu Vatu
1 Philippine Peso = 0.0517 Samoa Tala
1 Philippine Peso = 12.11064 CFA Franc (BEAC)
1 Philippine Peso = 0.05422 East Caribbean Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 12.18876 CFA Franc (BCEAO)
1 Philippine Peso = 2.19137 Pacific Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 5.01908 Yemen Riyal
1 Philippine Peso = 0.26099 South African Rand
1 Philippine Peso = 104.20683 Zambian Kwacha
1 Philippine Peso = 7.26707 Zimbabwe dollar

ROAD SAFETY SERIES; Understanding driving during, after earthquakes

Romer Guimba was driving his jeepney along the Talisay-Tanauan Road just past the Total Gas Station on route to the Talaga Public Elementary School to pick up his regular student passengers when the Magnitude 5.9 earthquake struck.

“Hindi ko po nahalata nung una, pero nakakatakot kasi parang nawala sa lugar ang sasakyan ko,” (I didn’t notice it at first then it got was scary, I could not seem to control my vehicle) Guimba said.

He immediately pulled over but after the next 10 seconds the earthquake was gone.

Laden with 8 passengers who panicked when the jeepney started pulling sideways made it more difficult to react. 

“Parang flat po ang sasakyan. Ang bigat pihitin ng manibela,” (The vehicle felt like it had flat tires, it was difficult maneuver),” adds Guimba.

Driving a 2016 sports utility vehicle with a jetski in tow, Jules Gamboa of Laguna was on his way to Eagle Point beach on the Balayan Bay side of Mabini town by Bagalangit—the epicenter of the 5.6 earthquake of April 4.

“The first thing I noticed was that the trailer was not centered with the car,” said Gamboa, a jet ski enthusiast.

His first instinct was to pull over. The van in front seemed to be swaying side to side. He could see the lamp posts swaying and the electric wires overhead flapping. After the brief earthquake he noticed that most of the vehicles along the Mabini National Road were stopped by the roadside, everyone obviously caught by surprise.

It was a different story of Guillermo Cabotaje, a former trailer driver on the Mabini Circumferential Road. Driving a small van ferrying tourists to one of the many dive sites around the coastal town. The truck in front was slowing down abruptly, causing him to brake urgently.

“Nakita kong sumasayaw ang mga poste ng kuryente sa kanan, kaya’t doon po ako tumigil sa kaliwa, tabing dagat, malayo sa poste,” (I saw the electric poles swaying so I stopped on the left side of the road near the coast, away from the posts) Cabotaje narrated. 

Cabotaje, 58 was a driver a vegetable farmers cooperative in Baguio. On July 16, 1990, he was at Camp 3 of Kennon Road heading from Cabanatuan when the “Big One” of that decade struck. He narrated how that eight-second earthquake seemed like 10 minutes. 

He saw portions of the road buckle. Landslides began blocking the road. But instead of pulling over, he rushed down the mountain road that was literally crumbling beneath him. He could not go back up Kennon, fearing for the safety of his family who then lived in Loakan.

He was driving a full-size six-wheel truck filled with vegetables.

“Overloaded nga po kami madalas at puno ng hangin yun gulong,” he relates, stating that looking back now it seemed the vehicle itself was dangerous to drive with a tall cargo bay and overinflated tires to carry the extra payload.

Like in the case of Guimba in the first story, his passengers, 5 Filipino and 3 foreign tourists we picked up from Manila, all panicked when he took evasive action. 

He admits the passenger panic also scared him.

Once the earthquake stopped the passengers rushed out of the van but a few minutes later when another earthquake happened. 

In a span of less than a week, an earthquake swarm of nearly 10 earthquakes of Magnitude 4 and up have hit the Calabarzon region. Three of the strongest ones happened from April 4 in Puerto Galera to Batangas last April 8 and in back to Mindoro on April 9.

Shakemaps from the United States Geological Survey (USGS) show the strongest of the quakes hit inland in Tanauan, Batangas but the most felt was a tectonic shaker of Magnitude 5.5 in the coastal resort town of Mabini, also Batangas. 

The severity of an earthquake determines how a driver reacts to it. The “panic level” changes from “I didn’t feel it” to “what the hell is going on.” And drivers like Mr. Cabojate says that once the earth is moving, fear takes over your senses.

Less control and the potential for road crashes are the first result of driving panic. But panic and surprise are also the top reasons drivers instinctively pull off the road and park the car. In the stories of the three drivers, only one, Cabajote took stock of his surroundings. The rest simply pulled over—one even above an electric post with swaying wires. 

All the drivers and their passengers stayed in the car until the ground stopped moving.  This self-imposed “all clear” call is a function of self-preservation. It was also observed that in one instance, the passengers who disembark after a “coast is clear” declaration scrambled back to the vehicle at the first sign of another tremor.

It is a good idea to stay in the vehicle while a visual assessment of the surroundings is done. It’s also a good time to recap what just happened by gathering some information. Listening to the radio and reading social media feeds or texting friends is best, instead of making a phone call. Phone calls congest the lines since voice uses up more bandwidth than data or SMS. 

Our beautiful country is filled with many infrastructure components that usually becomes unsafe or rickety after a natural disaster. Look for collapsed bridges, broken pavement, overhangs, fallen power lines, cracks in tunnels or flyovers, steep roads (which have a huge potential for liquefaction) or landslides. 

Driving after an earthquake is a more horrible experience than driving during it. 

Before starting to drive, listen to the radio for reports, use technology to get your way around. Call our on Waze for road conditions. Check Facebook or Twitter for earthquake related feeds. Assess the condition of your route, and visually confirm it. 

Take photos and share it on official social media feeds of the local government you are in or the Department of Public Works and Highways (DPWH), Department of Transporation (DOTr) or the Land Transportation Office (LTO). 

If the roads look drivable, proceed with caution. There could be a lot of debris which could do tire or underchassis damage. 

This story was produced under the Bloomberg Initiative-Global Road Safety Media Fellowship implemented by the World Health Organization, Department of Transportation and Communications and VERA Files.
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