July 17, 2018, 6:59 pm
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1 Philippine Peso = 0.06864 UAE Dirham
1 Philippine Peso = 2.00897 Albanian Lek
1 Philippine Peso = 0.03439 Neth Antilles Guilder
1 Philippine Peso = 0.50824 Argentine Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 0.02516 Australian Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.03326 Aruba Florin
1 Philippine Peso = 0.03738 Barbados Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 1.56345 Bangladesh Taka
1 Philippine Peso = 0.03139 Bulgarian Lev
1 Philippine Peso = 0.00707 Bahraini Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 32.72248 Burundi Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01869 Bermuda Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.02526 Brunei Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.1282 Bolivian Boliviano
1 Philippine Peso = 0.07195 Brazilian Real
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01869 Bahamian Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 1.282 Bhutan Ngultrum
1 Philippine Peso = 0.19138 Botswana Pula
1 Philippine Peso = 374.13568 Belarus Ruble
1 Philippine Peso = 0.03734 Belize Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.02459 Canadian Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01871 Swiss Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 12.14969 Chilean Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 0.12502 Chinese Yuan
1 Philippine Peso = 53.37133 Colombian Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 10.54401 Costa Rica Colon
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01869 Cuban Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 1.76603 Cape Verde Escudo
1 Philippine Peso = 0.4139 Czech Koruna
1 Philippine Peso = 3.31714 Djibouti Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 0.11919 Danish Krone
1 Philippine Peso = 0.92375 Dominican Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 2.19884 Algerian Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.25015 Estonian Kroon
1 Philippine Peso = 0.3334 Egyptian Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 0.51037 Ethiopian Birr
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01599 Euro
1 Philippine Peso = 0.03902 Fiji Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01411 Falkland Islands Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01412 British Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 0.08949 Ghanaian Cedi
1 Philippine Peso = 0.88526 Gambian Dalasi
1 Philippine Peso = 168.36105 Guinea Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 0.13998 Guatemala Quetzal
1 Philippine Peso = 3.87012 Guyana Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.14665 Hong Kong Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.44715 Honduras Lempira
1 Philippine Peso = 0.11858 Croatian Kuna
1 Philippine Peso = 1.25939 Haiti Gourde
1 Philippine Peso = 5.1596 Hungarian Forint
1 Philippine Peso = 268.604 Indonesian Rupiah
1 Philippine Peso = 0.06791 Israeli Shekel
1 Philippine Peso = 1.27993 Indian Rupee
1 Philippine Peso = 22.12671 Iraqi Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 807.13885 Iran Rial
1 Philippine Peso = 2.0015 Iceland Krona
1 Philippine Peso = 2.42478 Jamaican Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01324 Jordanian Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 2.09923 Japanese Yen
1 Philippine Peso = 1.87722 Kenyan Shilling
1 Philippine Peso = 1.27646 Kyrgyzstan Som
1 Philippine Peso = 75.63072 Cambodia Riel
1 Philippine Peso = 7.88806 Comoros Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 16.81929 North Korean Won
1 Philippine Peso = 21.08952 Korean Won
1 Philippine Peso = 0.00566 Kuwaiti Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01532 Cayman Islands Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 6.39993 Kazakhstan Tenge
1 Philippine Peso = 157.01738 Lao Kip
1 Philippine Peso = 28.13493 Lebanese Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 2.97982 Sri Lanka Rupee
1 Philippine Peso = 2.97197 Liberian Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.24762 Lesotho Loti
1 Philippine Peso = 0.05697 Lithuanian Lita
1 Philippine Peso = 0.0116 Latvian Lat
1 Philippine Peso = 0.02562 Libyan Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.17688 Moroccan Dirham
1 Philippine Peso = 0.31088 Moldovan Leu
1 Philippine Peso = 0.98075 Macedonian Denar
1 Philippine Peso = 26.55578 Myanmar Kyat
1 Philippine Peso = 45.74846 Mongolian Tugrik
1 Philippine Peso = 0.15104 Macau Pataca
1 Philippine Peso = 6.63427 Mauritania Ougulya
1 Philippine Peso = 0.6382 Mauritius Rupee
1 Philippine Peso = 0.29097 Maldives Rufiyaa
1 Philippine Peso = 13.33283 Malawi Kwacha
1 Philippine Peso = 0.35287 Mexican Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 0.07569 Malaysian Ringgit
1 Philippine Peso = 0.24767 Namibian Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 6.69034 Nigerian Naira
1 Philippine Peso = 0.58456 Nicaragua Cordoba
1 Philippine Peso = 0.15155 Norwegian Krone
1 Philippine Peso = 2.04691 Nepalese Rupee
1 Philippine Peso = 0.02764 New Zealand Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.00719 Omani Rial
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01869 Panama Balboa
1 Philippine Peso = 0.06103 Peruvian Nuevo Sol
1 Philippine Peso = 0.06077 Papua New Guinea Kina
1 Philippine Peso = 1 Philippine Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 2.27135 Pakistani Rupee
1 Philippine Peso = 0.06898 Polish Zloty
1 Philippine Peso = 106.5969 Paraguayan Guarani
1 Philippine Peso = 0.06802 Qatar Rial
1 Philippine Peso = 0.07424 Romanian New Leu
1 Philippine Peso = 1.1686 Russian Rouble
1 Philippine Peso = 15.92992 Rwanda Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 0.07008 Saudi Arabian Riyal
1 Philippine Peso = 0.14699 Solomon Islands Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.25089 Seychelles Rupee
1 Philippine Peso = 0.33555 Sudanese Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 0.16567 Swedish Krona
1 Philippine Peso = 0.02551 Singapore Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01412 St Helena Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 0.41499 Slovak Koruna
1 Philippine Peso = 153.24238 Sierra Leone Leone
1 Philippine Peso = 10.65221 Somali Shilling
1 Philippine Peso = 391.8333 Sao Tome Dobra
1 Philippine Peso = 0.16352 El Salvador Colon
1 Philippine Peso = 9.624 Syrian Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 0.24803 Swaziland Lilageni
1 Philippine Peso = 0.62213 Thai Baht
1 Philippine Peso = 0.04953 Tunisian Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.04334 Tongan paʻanga
1 Philippine Peso = 0.09042 Turkish Lira
1 Philippine Peso = 0.12621 Trinidad Tobago Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.57118 Taiwan Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 42.3846 Tanzanian Shilling
1 Philippine Peso = 0.48981 Ukraine Hryvnia
1 Philippine Peso = 69.93085 Ugandan Shilling
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01869 United States Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.58568 Uruguayan New Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 145.44945 Uzbekistan Sum
1 Philippine Peso = 2236.96505 Venezuelan Bolivar
1 Philippine Peso = 430.74192 Vietnam Dong
1 Philippine Peso = 2.06036 Vanuatu Vatu
1 Philippine Peso = 0.04858 Samoa Tala
1 Philippine Peso = 10.48103 CFA Franc (BEAC)
1 Philippine Peso = 0.05046 East Caribbean Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 10.48103 CFA Franc (BCEAO)
1 Philippine Peso = 1.90563 Pacific Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 4.66922 Yemen Riyal
1 Philippine Peso = 0.24782 South African Rand
1 Philippine Peso = 96.98187 Zambian Kwacha
1 Philippine Peso = 6.76322 Zimbabwe dollar

Motorcycle lanes alone won’t make riding safer; safe riding attitude will

METRO Manila Development Authority’s (MMDA) strict re-implementation of the use of motorcycle lanes along EDSA drew various reactions from motorists. The MMDA said the use of the lane was primarily for traffic decongestion and safety of motorcyclists. 

The idea of a motorcycle lane may put some order in the traffic mess, but it does not necessarily make riding safer. Containing vehicles of the same kind, buses on the yellow bus lane and motorcycles inside the blue “Motorcycle Reclusion Lane” may have its benefits but these benefits can only have impact if there is an understanding on how it should be used coupled with rider discipline that can only come from training, attitude and riding experience.

Safety maybe a side benefit of gathering two wheelers into the lane and motorcycle ride s caught outside the motorcycle lane will be fined P500.

Jake Swann, Rider Coach of the MSF (Motorcycle Safety Foundation) in America and a member of the Road Safety Management team of the MMDA said that a motorcycle lane has its good and bad points. He agrees that a “container” for motorcycles is a solution that may increase the road safety for “vulnerable road users” significantly.

Vulnerable road users are pedestrians, pedicabs, tricycles, bicycles and motorcyclists. In the Philippine setting this may include ambulant vendors and pushcarts that cross major roads. 

The World Health Organization said motorcyclists comprise the highest number of victims in a road crash, numbering 56 percent of deaths on the road. Top causes or death are head traumas, ruptured internal organs as a result of the body’s absorption of the crash energy.

One reason for the high rate of fatalities in a road crash is the way motorcyclists filter (or wander) around the road, riding in the blind corners of bigger vehicles. Given the common reasons for road crash-related deaths, riding within the confines of a motorcycle lane seems to be a good idea.

“The point, I think of the MMDA is to get the riders to stop “wandering””on the road and organize them into one lane. There a number of skilled riders on the roads, but there are also those who are unpredictable, too fast and even too slow,” Swann pointed out.

“Giving motorcyclists an exclusive lane would have been more effective if it was really exclusive. Because it would negate filtering which is one of the frequent cause of motorcycle accidents and road rage,” Jowi Faulve, a daily motorcyclist, riding expert from Tanay, Rizal. He transverses EDSA and observed how the motorcycle lane seemed to have put riders in more danger.

“Other multi wheeled vehicles darting in and out of the motorcycle lane post as a hazard to motorcyclists. It may help manage traffic but allowing bigger vehicles to use the lane only adds to filtering and riders have no choice but to still ride on the blind side especially with vehicles that refuse to yield the safer side of the the lane,” Faulve adds.

The cause of this dilemma extends beyond training, but rather into licensing. 

“The current system allows unqualified people to operate motor vehicles—all cars, jeeps, vans, tricycles, trucks, trailer trucks—and not just motorcycles. The ease of acquiring a license, causes the driver to not respect it and not fear it’s loss. Hence they don’t respect it. Anything gained without much effort is trivialized, since it isn’t valued,” Swann observes.

Antony Acosta drives a delivery motorcycle from a popular foodchain. He said that the motorcycle lane freed up traffic a bit but did not take away bad drivers and bad riders. He also said that it would have been a big help to motorcyclists if it was an exclusive lane, instead of being shared because of the tendency of bigger vehicles to disrespect the space allocated for a motorcycle.

“Ang ibang sasakyan pasok, labas sa kalsada at walang respeto sa mga nagmomotor, akala nila kanila ang kalsada, kaya nakakadisgrasya sa iba,” (Other multi wheeled vehicles dart in and out of the motorcycle lane, show no respect for motorcyclists, drive like they own the road posing a hazard to other road users), Acosta says.

Swann says more than the motorcycle lane, knowledge, skill and attitude are prime. These are validated by a good licensing process that includes actual rider evaluation and training (or retraining)—something that may be impossible given current resources. 

Rider knowledge is developed by reading, training and application connected to seat time.

Many motorcyclists come into riding simply because they know how to ride a bike. This graduation from a human propelled vehicle to one powered by an engine requires an attitude change and a development of a mindset that is more conscious to other vehicles and not just keeping balance. 

Enough proper knowledge, awareness of what is wrong and not in riding multiplied by road experience results in skills. Increasing skill levels in a proper safety framework should be a goal of every rider. This skill turns into instinct, which makes for safer riding. Riding skillfully also takes consideration for other road users. This can be further developed after good and bad experiences are gained and become lessons over time. 

Training riders in various road conditions BEFORE they actually ride, can advance this skill levels without going to painful or potentially fatal experiences of crashing. Government must consider making training mandatory.

“Rider training is possible, but there are limited locations for that. If you want to observe how practical motorcycle licensing is done, visit the LTO range in Diliman,” Swann points out. 

Experts however agree that development of a positive riding attitude is the best deterrent to road crashes and possible deaths. This attitude includes a defensive stance while riding. Defensive riding follows the same rules as defensive driving, with an added perspective—vulnerability.

“A true make do solution is people have to realize that the road space is limited, the population is growing, vehicles sales too. We must share whatever roadways we have. How we do this will dictate the quality of time we have to spend on the road,” Swann concludes.

Road safety for motorcycles is thus defined by three simple rules, constantly yield and give way, be visible as other vehicles may not see you and protect yourself by riding alert and courteously. Road safety as a function of government has to do with tougher licensing and proper enforcement.
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