January 19, 2017, 10:20 am
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1 Philippine Peso = 0.07373 UAE Dirham
1 Philippine Peso = 2.57378 Albanian Lek
1 Philippine Peso = 0.03554 Neth Antilles Guilder
1 Philippine Peso = 0.31799 Argentine Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 0.02683 Australian Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.03594 Aruba Florin
1 Philippine Peso = 0.04015 Barbados Dollar
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1 Philippine Peso = 0.03683 Bulgarian Lev
1 Philippine Peso = 0.00756 Bahraini Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 33.69343 Burundi Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 0.02008 Bermuda Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.02866 Brunei Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.13752 Bolivian Boliviano
1 Philippine Peso = 0.06466 Brazilian Real
1 Philippine Peso = 0.02008 Bahamian Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 1.3697 Bhutan Ngultrum
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1 Philippine Peso = 13.25216 Chilean Peso
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1 Philippine Peso = 0.02008 Cuban Peso
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1 Philippine Peso = 3.5802 Djibouti Franc
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1 Philippine Peso = 2.20173 Algerian Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.29553 Estonian Kroon
1 Philippine Peso = 0.37844 Egyptian Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 0.45091 Ethiopian Birr
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01889 Euro
1 Philippine Peso = 0.04186 Fiji Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01668 Falkland Islands Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01668 British Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 0.08489 Ghanaian Cedi
1 Philippine Peso = 0.88376 Gambian Dalasi
1 Philippine Peso = 186.70949 Guinea Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 0.15123 Guatemala Quetzal
1 Philippine Peso = 4.106 Guyana Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.15569 Hong Kong Dollar
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1 Philippine Peso = 1.15559 Macedonian Denar
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1 Philippine Peso = 0.27209 Namibian Dollar
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1 Philippine Peso = 2.1843 Nepalese Rupee
1 Philippine Peso = 0.02826 New Zealand Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.00773 Omani Rial
1 Philippine Peso = 0.02008 Panama Balboa
1 Philippine Peso = 0.06745 Peruvian Nuevo Sol
1 Philippine Peso = 0.06333 Papua New Guinea Kina
1 Philippine Peso = 1 Philippine Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 2.10359 Pakistani Rupee
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1 Philippine Peso = 116.05701 Paraguayan Guarani
1 Philippine Peso = 0.0731 Qatar Rial
1 Philippine Peso = 0.08481 Romanian New Leu
1 Philippine Peso = 1.19264 Russian Rouble
1 Philippine Peso = 16.31379 Rwanda Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 0.07528 Saudi Arabian Riyal
1 Philippine Peso = 0.15698 Solomon Islands Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.26272 Seychelles Rupee
1 Philippine Peso = 0.12864 Sudanese Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 0.17904 Swedish Krona
1 Philippine Peso = 0.02867 Singapore Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01668 St Helena Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 0.44581 Slovak Koruna
1 Philippine Peso = 146.29592 Sierra Leone Leone
1 Philippine Peso = 10.96165 Somali Shilling
1 Philippine Peso = 462.93516 Sao Tome Dobra
1 Philippine Peso = 0.17511 El Salvador Colon
1 Philippine Peso = 10.33889 Syrian Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 0.27216 Swaziland Lilageni
1 Philippine Peso = 0.7113 Thai Baht
1 Philippine Peso = 0.04658 Tunisian Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.04632 Tonga Pa'ang
1 Philippine Peso = 0.07556 Turkish Lira
1 Philippine Peso = 0.1345 Trinidad Tobago Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.63521 Taiwan Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 44.48906 Tanzanian Shilling
1 Philippine Peso = 0.5529 Ukraine Hryvnia
1 Philippine Peso = 72.37502 Ugandan Shilling
1 Philippine Peso = 0.02008 United States Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.57519 Uruguayan New Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 64.9468 Uzbekistan Sum
1 Philippine Peso = 0.20026 Venezuelan Bolivar
1 Philippine Peso = 453.06163 Vietnam Dong
1 Philippine Peso = 2.15479 Vanuatu Vatu
1 Philippine Peso = 0.05167 Samoa Tala
1 Philippine Peso = 12.38747 CFA Franc (BEAC)
1 Philippine Peso = 0.05421 East Caribbean Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 12.49508 CFA Franc (BCEAO)
1 Philippine Peso = 2.24312 Pacific Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 5.01706 Yemen Riyal
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Impatience, desperation derail US home sales

NEW YORK - Dan and Kelly Neubeck do not know what sunk the deal to buy their dream house in Chicago last fall. The process was rolling along after they signed the contract for a full-price offer, but somehow their love was unrequited.

The sellers abruptly pulled out and left them bereft.

“It is difficult to not quickly become attached to a home that you really want,” said Dan Neubeck, 37, who works for the city of Chicago. “I would definitely advise home buyers to stay open-minded and not fall in love with a property until the whole process is complete.”

Home sale deals always fall through from time to time, but in today’s tight housing market, the numbers are jumping. A new study released on Wednesday from housing website Trulia.com compiled data on homes that were reported to be “in contract” before their status changed back to active.

Nationally, the failed sales rate nearly doubled in 2016.

Many sales that never closed involved first-time buyers eager to jump into a hot market. Starter and trade-up housing was on the shakiest ground, while deals for new homes and those built before 1920 were the least likely to unravel.

Some metropolitan areas exhibited bigger failure rates than others.

Since 2014, when Trulia began to aggregate data from local multiple listing services all over the country, Las Vegas has led the pack with 7.6 percent of listings reverting back to “for sale” at least once.

Last year, Charleston, South Carolina, had the biggest rise in failure rates, jumping to 10.2 percent from just 1.6 percent in 2015. Other hot spots include Ventura County, California; Tucson, Arizona; and Atlanta.

In Charleston, real estate agent Mark Mitchell attributes most of the failed sales to buyers’ rushing into an extremely popular market where few homes are available.

Mitchell, as associate broker at Dune Properties, had two sales fail in the last 30 days. One couple was moving to the area from Indianapolis to retire and start a business on the side. Even though Mitchell tried to send them to a mortgage broker before signing a contract, they skipped that step and missed out on a purchase because they did not qualify for the financing they sought.

“They were making an emotional move,” Mitchell said, and now they are downsizing their dreams from a $500,000 house to condos in the $250,000 range.

Another Charleston broker, Jan Snook of Carolina One Real Estate, said her office had about seven failed contracts out of more than 50 last year. Some were because of mortgage problems on the buyer’s side, but more often than not, sales failed because of issues with the houses.

One buyer was intent on a house that Snook knew would have problems because of the age and condition of the roof. The client wanted to try anyway, but lo and behold, the inspection said the roof would need to be replaced to qualify for a loan insured by the Federal Housing Administration.

“It was unrealistic expectations on both sides,” Snook said. “But that’s why those FHA protections are there.”

Felipe Chacon, the Trulia housing data analyst who authored the sales failure study, said buyers need to do their homework and be willing to wait for the right home at the right price.

“You want to get your preapproval for a mortgage and ask a lot of questions because you don’t want surprises to come up,” he said.

From the seller side, Chacon said the most important thing is to be honest about problems and fix what you can.

Also, list the house at a reasonable price so the appraisal does not come back lower than that and cause banks to deny a mortgage.

David Liu, a 33-year-old who works in healthcare information technology, learned that lesson when he put a house on the market near San Francisco in 2014.

Despite the hot market there, two deals fell through because the buyers had financing issues. He eventually sold the house after several price cuts.

Sellers may also want to get a pre-emptive inspection on the property they are trying to sell and start making the needed repairs, said USRealty.com Chief Executive Officer Colby Sambrotto.

This is key in a market like Austin, Texas, said Redfin.com agent Andrew Vallejo. He said most of the failures he has seen recently are because the topography of the area causes foundation problems for concrete slab homes that are 50 to 80 years old.

Vallejo has hopes for better houses coming on the market this spring. “It almost feels like it was leftovers on the market this past year,” he said. – Reuters
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