June 26, 2018, 12:46 am
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1 Philippine Peso = 0.06901 UAE Dirham
1 Philippine Peso = 2.02912 Albanian Lek
1 Philippine Peso = 0.03401 Neth Antilles Guilder
1 Philippine Peso = 0.5072 Argentine Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 0.02524 Australian Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.03345 Aruba Florin
1 Philippine Peso = 0.03758 Barbados Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 1.57159 Bangladesh Taka
1 Philippine Peso = 0.03155 Bulgarian Lev
1 Philippine Peso = 0.00712 Bahraini Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 32.90079 Burundi Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01879 Bermuda Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.02526 Brunei Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.1289 Bolivian Boliviano
1 Philippine Peso = 0.07111 Brazilian Real
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01879 Bahamian Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 1.28053 Bhutan Ngultrum
1 Philippine Peso = 0.19402 Botswana Pula
1 Philippine Peso = 376.17437 Belarus Ruble
1 Philippine Peso = 0.03754 Belize Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.02493 Canadian Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01856 Swiss Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 11.99061 Chilean Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 0.12218 Chinese Yuan
1 Philippine Peso = 54.75385 Colombian Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 10.57591 Costa Rica Colon
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01879 Cuban Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 1.77772 Cape Verde Escudo
1 Philippine Peso = 0.41526 Czech Koruna
1 Philippine Peso = 3.33615 Djibouti Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 0.12016 Danish Krone
1 Philippine Peso = 0.92728 Dominican Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 2.1963 Algerian Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.25225 Estonian Kroon
1 Philippine Peso = 0.33484 Egyptian Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 0.51146 Ethiopian Birr
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01612 Euro
1 Philippine Peso = 0.03918 Fiji Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01416 Falkland Islands Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01417 British Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 0.08979 Ghanaian Cedi
1 Philippine Peso = 0.87956 Gambian Dalasi
1 Philippine Peso = 169.07178 Guinea Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 0.14072 Guatemala Quetzal
1 Philippine Peso = 3.87599 Guyana Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.14741 Hong Kong Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.44878 Honduras Lempira
1 Philippine Peso = 0.11882 Croatian Kuna
1 Philippine Peso = 1.24803 Haiti Gourde
1 Philippine Peso = 5.23224 Hungarian Forint
1 Philippine Peso = 264.43067 Indonesian Rupiah
1 Philippine Peso = 0.06764 Israeli Shekel
1 Philippine Peso = 1.27568 Indian Rupee
1 Philippine Peso = 22.24728 Iraqi Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 798.38407 Iran Rial
1 Philippine Peso = 2.03119 Iceland Krona
1 Philippine Peso = 2.45509 Jamaican Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01333 Jordanian Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 2.06417 Japanese Yen
1 Philippine Peso = 1.89121 Kenyan Shilling
1 Philippine Peso = 1.28183 Kyrgyzstan Som
1 Philippine Peso = 76.00526 Cambodia Riel
1 Philippine Peso = 7.92522 Comoros Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 16.91094 North Korean Won
1 Philippine Peso = 20.86622 Korean Won
1 Philippine Peso = 0.00568 Kuwaiti Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01541 Cayman Islands Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 6.38595 Kazakhstan Tenge
1 Philippine Peso = 158.00451 Lao Kip
1 Philippine Peso = 28.292 Lebanese Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 2.98572 Sri Lanka Rupee
1 Philippine Peso = 2.74709 Liberian Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.25254 Lesotho Loti
1 Philippine Peso = 0.05728 Lithuanian Lita
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01166 Latvian Lat
1 Philippine Peso = 0.02548 Libyan Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.1786 Moroccan Dirham
1 Philippine Peso = 0.3177 Moldovan Leu
1 Philippine Peso = 0.98891 Macedonian Denar
1 Philippine Peso = 25.98647 Myanmar Kyat
1 Philippine Peso = 45.97896 Mongolian Tugrik
1 Philippine Peso = 0.15183 Macau Pataca
1 Philippine Peso = 6.67042 Mauritania Ougulya
1 Philippine Peso = 0.65295 Mauritius Rupee
1 Philippine Peso = 0.29256 Maldives Rufiyaa
1 Philippine Peso = 13.4053 Malawi Kwacha
1 Philippine Peso = 0.37584 Mexican Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 0.07518 Malaysian Ringgit
1 Philippine Peso = 0.25239 Namibian Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 6.72679 Nigerian Naira
1 Philippine Peso = 0.59207 Nicaragua Cordoba
1 Philippine Peso = 0.15205 Norwegian Krone
1 Philippine Peso = 2.03401 Nepalese Rupee
1 Philippine Peso = 0.02719 New Zealand Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.00723 Omani Rial
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01879 Panama Balboa
1 Philippine Peso = 0.06134 Peruvian Nuevo Sol
1 Philippine Peso = 0.0609 Papua New Guinea Kina
1 Philippine Peso = 1 Philippine Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 2.28222 Pakistani Rupee
1 Philippine Peso = 0.06966 Polish Zloty
1 Philippine Peso = 106.55769 Paraguayan Guarani
1 Philippine Peso = 0.06839 Qatar Rial
1 Philippine Peso = 0.07509 Romanian New Leu
1 Philippine Peso = 1.18236 Russian Rouble
1 Philippine Peso = 15.96073 Rwanda Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 0.07046 Saudi Arabian Riyal
1 Philippine Peso = 0.1479 Solomon Islands Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.25235 Seychelles Rupee
1 Philippine Peso = 0.33738 Sudanese Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 0.16635 Swedish Krona
1 Philippine Peso = 0.02551 Singapore Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01417 St Helena Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 0.41725 Slovak Koruna
1 Philippine Peso = 149.94363 Sierra Leone Leone
1 Philippine Peso = 10.72905 Somali Shilling
1 Philippine Peso = 394.98309 Sao Tome Dobra
1 Philippine Peso = 0.16441 El Salvador Colon
1 Philippine Peso = 9.67644 Syrian Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 0.25202 Swaziland Lilageni
1 Philippine Peso = 0.61856 Thai Baht
1 Philippine Peso = 0.04882 Tunisian Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.04333 Tongan paʻanga
1 Philippine Peso = 0.08786 Turkish Lira
1 Philippine Peso = 0.12682 Trinidad Tobago Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.56924 Taiwan Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 42.63435 Tanzanian Shilling
1 Philippine Peso = 0.49267 Ukraine Hryvnia
1 Philippine Peso = 72.51597 Ugandan Shilling
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01879 United States Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.59451 Uruguayan New Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 147.50094 Uzbekistan Sum
1 Philippine Peso = 1499.4363 Venezuelan Bolivar
1 Philippine Peso = 430.10147 Vietnam Dong
1 Philippine Peso = 2.07159 Vanuatu Vatu
1 Philippine Peso = 0.0488 Samoa Tala
1 Philippine Peso = 10.56614 CFA Franc (BEAC)
1 Philippine Peso = 0.05073 East Caribbean Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 10.56614 CFA Franc (BCEAO)
1 Philippine Peso = 1.92165 Pacific Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 4.69466 Yemen Riyal
1 Philippine Peso = 0.25241 South African Rand
1 Philippine Peso = 97.51033 Zambian Kwacha
1 Philippine Peso = 6.80008 Zimbabwe dollar

GOOGLE SHOWS THE WAY: Fighting fake news with wit, tech tools

BEFORE the Internet, “fake news” was not a term many people used . It used to simply refer to hoaxes and fabrications usually about celebrities, their lives and their deaths. In the Philippines the word became widespread after Mocha Uson began peddling misinformation, “symbolic photos” and curious news items from known generators of false news. 

Ellen Tordesillas pointed out how President Rodrigo Duterte himself is the source of fake news, this claim verified statistically and proven categorically by Vera Files (www.veragiles.org) through comparisons of his speeches. 

Tordesillas conclusion bolsters the fact that fake news (as we know it today) propagates because of it comes from a source trusted by those who carelessly spread it and further spread by those who mindlessly believe in it. 

At about the same time Donald Trump began branding news agencies such as CNN and the New York Times as sources of fake news, only because these news outlets choose to publish content that looks at both sides of the story and takes into strong account its role as the 4th estate—the vanguard of democracy by keeping those in power in check.

In the past 18 months fake news has become the greatest threat to our democracy—not only in the Philippines but all over the world. It has transformed from a humorous discourse to an imposition to civil debate and a source of tension—not only between people but also between nations. Remember how Trump and North Korean leader Kim Jong-un almost sparked a world war with a Tweet?

The Internet is fertile ground to cultivate hoaxes and falsehoods. Since its early days, it has 
been associated with propagating lies. But recently, the organized and systematic misinformation we call fake news, hurled against brands, organizations, people, nations have influenced perspectives.

And at times (with the use of professional communication experts, digital marketers, programmers and code engineers) it is spread by governments with ill and polarizing effects 
on democracy and society. 

The purveyors of these systems of propaganda have weaponized falsehoods to such a point that it has made Trump shutter CNN’s Jim Acosta shouting to him “you are fake news” as the reported was asking a legitimate question. This same weaponization is justification for President Duterte to ban Rappler reported Pia Ranada after watching the Senate hearing in which is Special Assistant Bong Go accused Rappler and the Philippine Daily Inquirer of reporting fake news on a controversial Navy project.

Ask Mocha who spreads fake news and she will point to Inquirer, GMA-7 and Rappler. But study the contents of her social media posts and materials she has shared over the months even before she took over her official government post, she is guilty. 

But guilty of what? What is fake news and how much of a problem it is really?  What can we, the person on the street do about it?

Google Philippines recently held a discussion forum with select members of the media to introduce tools that can help reduce misleading online information. The methods are simple yet effective, involving mostly the same tools used to do simple searches for academic purposes, verifying the death hoax of Sylvester Stallone or to find out what the hottest celebrity is doing.

These include collaborative tools, advanced searches, public data exploration, Google Maps, Google Earth and Google Trends as well as Googles 360 / VR and AR functions. 

Not all the tools are not exclusively Google’s. Others utilize the power of websites such as “Wayback Machine” (https://archive.org/web/) which stores over 310 billion webpages saved over time.  This one single site provided access for example to old deleted sites which may contain information that will verify facts.
Images are one of the most prominent sources of fake news.

Using Google tools for image searching, a heavily edited photo such as this one of the supposed crashed Malaysian Airlines was detected and busted as fake news, with the original photo linked back to the image bank Getty Images. 

Fake crash. Left photo shows the supposed wreckage of the Malaysian Airlines flight 17. The actual crash photo is on the right which came from Getty Images, an online source of images.

To detect the source, an advanced search of similar photos using a simple right click and “Search Google for Image” will retrieve similar images chosen by how text tags, or even by how it looks. This simple, yet impressively effective image searches can retrieve from servers all over the world photos which can be used for reference, verification or even copyright.

Using a website called Tiny Eye Reverse Image search (www.tineye.com) fast and accurate image recognition of images is possible including finding important and sensitive information such as metadata. 

Metadata can lead to discoveries of location, either longtitude and latitude data or an actual name of a place. Using Google Earth and Google Maps, images can be examined and with pinpoint accuracy find the actual location. In places where there is Google 360 information, then images of the actual place can also be seen. 

An example of metadata put to good use is when anti-virus guru and tycoon John McAfee, wanted in the United States for murder was found in Guatemala, after an online magazine posted a photo that had GPS data of his location.

One way fake news is peddled by pushing it into the social media networks and is detected or appears like an ad with a link.

Google Chrome has an ad blocker which can prove effective for fake news spread like ads with a pop up. It is an example of how Google can override content for users by individual setting of its browser. Interestingly once set it will block out ads that don’t adhere to the standards of the Coalition for Better Ads (www.betterads.org).

First Draft (www.firstdraftnews.org) is a a project of the Harvard Kennedy School’s Shorenstein Center, fights mis- and disinformation through fieldwork, research and education. Along with Google tools it has developed training programs that help verify stories, whether written or photographed. 

 GoogleNewsLab is an online resource that allows everyone (academics, journalists, students and the prudent man-behind-the-desk) to access various resources that can help spot a fake and debunk a myth.
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