January 23, 2018, 1:50 am
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1 Philippine Peso = 0.07248 UAE Dirham
1 Philippine Peso = 2.15117 Albanian Lek
1 Philippine Peso = 0.03513 Neth Antilles Guilder
1 Philippine Peso = 0.37432 Argentine Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 0.02466 Australian Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.03513 Aruba Florin
1 Philippine Peso = 0.03947 Barbados Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 1.63391 Bangladesh Taka
1 Philippine Peso = 0.0315 Bulgarian Lev
1 Philippine Peso = 0.00743 Bahraini Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 34.55654 Burundi Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01974 Bermuda Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.02619 Brunei Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.13539 Bolivian Boliviano
1 Philippine Peso = 0.06307 Brazilian Real
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01974 Bahamian Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 1.25863 Bhutan Ngultrum
1 Philippine Peso = 0.19114 Botswana Pula
1 Philippine Peso = 395.1056 Belarus Ruble
1 Philippine Peso = 0.03943 Belize Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.02465 Canadian Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01899 Swiss Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 11.98717 Chilean Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 0.12629 Chinese Yuan
1 Philippine Peso = 56.09039 Colombian Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 11.14821 Costa Rica Colon
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01974 Cuban Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 1.78074 Cape Verde Escudo
1 Philippine Peso = 0.40983 Czech Koruna
1 Philippine Peso = 3.49517 Djibouti Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 0.12017 Danish Krone
1 Philippine Peso = 0.94356 Dominican Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 2.24754 Algerian Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.25256 Estonian Kroon
1 Philippine Peso = 0.34873 Egyptian Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 0.537 Ethiopian Birr
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01614 Euro
1 Philippine Peso = 0.03952 Fiji Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01423 Falkland Islands Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01424 British Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 0.08955 Ghanaian Cedi
1 Philippine Peso = 0.95481 Gambian Dalasi
1 Philippine Peso = 177.50149 Guinea Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 0.14478 Guatemala Quetzal
1 Philippine Peso = 4.06335 Guyana Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.15424 Hong Kong Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.4645 Honduras Lempira
1 Philippine Peso = 0.11993 Croatian Kuna
1 Philippine Peso = 1.2536 Haiti Gourde
1 Philippine Peso = 4.98796 Hungarian Forint
1 Philippine Peso = 262.6801 Indonesian Rupiah
1 Philippine Peso = 0.06734 Israeli Shekel
1 Philippine Peso = 1.2595 Indian Rupee
1 Philippine Peso = 23.36688 Iraqi Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 722.49855 Iran Rial
1 Philippine Peso = 2.02684 Iceland Krona
1 Philippine Peso = 2.44306 Jamaican Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01395 Jordanian Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 2.18305 Japanese Yen
1 Philippine Peso = 2.02388 Kenyan Shilling
1 Philippine Peso = 1.36803 Kyrgyzstan Som
1 Philippine Peso = 79.05665 Cambodia Riel
1 Philippine Peso = 8.11131 Comoros Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 17.76199 North Korean Won
1 Philippine Peso = 21.05013 Korean Won
1 Philippine Peso = 0.00592 Kuwaiti Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01618 Cayman Islands Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 6.40616 Kazakhstan Tenge
1 Philippine Peso = 163.40439 Lao Kip
1 Philippine Peso = 29.70989 Lebanese Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 3.03631 Sri Lanka Rupee
1 Philippine Peso = 2.51372 Liberian Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.24018 Lesotho Loti
1 Philippine Peso = 0.06017 Lithuanian Lita
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01225 Latvian Lat
1 Philippine Peso = 0.02645 Libyan Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.1822 Moroccan Dirham
1 Philippine Peso = 0.33221 Moldovan Leu
1 Philippine Peso = 0.99072 Macedonian Denar
1 Philippine Peso = 26.54431 Myanmar Kyat
1 Philippine Peso = 47.6416 Mongolian Tugrik
1 Philippine Peso = 0.15887 Macau Pataca
1 Philippine Peso = 6.94691 Mauritania Ougulya
1 Philippine Peso = 0.64535 Mauritius Rupee
1 Philippine Peso = 0.3059 Maldives Rufiyaa
1 Philippine Peso = 14.08092 Malawi Kwacha
1 Philippine Peso = 0.36718 Mexican Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 0.07768 Malaysian Ringgit
1 Philippine Peso = 0.24178 Namibian Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 7.06532 Nigerian Naira
1 Philippine Peso = 0.6045 Nicaragua Cordoba
1 Philippine Peso = 0.15516 Norwegian Krone
1 Philippine Peso = 2.01397 Nepalese Rupee
1 Philippine Peso = 0.02711 New Zealand Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.00759 Omani Rial
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01974 Panama Balboa
1 Philippine Peso = 0.06337 Peruvian Nuevo Sol
1 Philippine Peso = 0.06241 Papua New Guinea Kina
1 Philippine Peso = 1 Philippine Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 2.17782 Pakistani Rupee
1 Philippine Peso = 0.06737 Polish Zloty
1 Philippine Peso = 110.75588 Paraguayan Guarani
1 Philippine Peso = 0.07183 Qatar Rial
1 Philippine Peso = 0.07523 Romanian New Leu
1 Philippine Peso = 1.11021 Russian Rouble
1 Philippine Peso = 16.49398 Rwanda Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 0.07401 Saudi Arabian Riyal
1 Philippine Peso = 0.15294 Solomon Islands Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.26317 Seychelles Rupee
1 Philippine Peso = 0.13811 Sudanese Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 0.15903 Swedish Krona
1 Philippine Peso = 0.02605 Singapore Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01423 St Helena Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 0.43825 Slovak Koruna
1 Philippine Peso = 150.5822 Sierra Leone Leone
1 Philippine Peso = 11.09138 Somali Shilling
1 Philippine Peso = 395.67793 Sao Tome Dobra
1 Philippine Peso = 0.17269 El Salvador Colon
1 Philippine Peso = 10.16341 Syrian Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 0.24082 Swaziland Lilageni
1 Philippine Peso = 0.62838 Thai Baht
1 Philippine Peso = 0.04813 Tunisian Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.04392 Tongan paʻanga
1 Philippine Peso = 0.07512 Turkish Lira
1 Philippine Peso = 0.1331 Trinidad Tobago Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.57902 Taiwan Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 44.22736 Tanzanian Shilling
1 Philippine Peso = 0.56937 Ukraine Hryvnia
1 Philippine Peso = 71.46241 Ugandan Shilling
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01974 United States Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.56325 Uruguayan New Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 160.3513 Uzbekistan Sum
1 Philippine Peso = 0.19686 Venezuelan Bolivar
1 Philippine Peso = 447.97712 Vietnam Dong
1 Philippine Peso = 2.03691 Vanuatu Vatu
1 Philippine Peso = 0.0496 Samoa Tala
1 Philippine Peso = 10.5818 CFA Franc (BEAC)
1 Philippine Peso = 0.05329 East Caribbean Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 10.49813 CFA Franc (BCEAO)
1 Philippine Peso = 1.92441 Pacific Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 4.9329 Yemen Riyal
1 Philippine Peso = 0.24034 South African Rand
1 Philippine Peso = 102.41761 Zambian Kwacha
1 Philippine Peso = 7.14229 Zimbabwe dollar

Five cyberthreats every security leader must know


THERE are five factors that are driving major changes in the cyberthreat landscape. Each of them makes it increasingly difficult for organizations to protect their networks, data, and communications from malicious actors.Let’s take a quick look at each of them to understand how and why they are playing a critical role.

1. Internet of Things. Much has been written about the Internet of Things (IoT). Predictions pinpoint exponential growth, with estimates that there will be 4.3 Internet-connected devices for every man, woman, and child on the planet by 2020. When we talk about IoT devices, they fall into three buckets. 

The first is consumer IoT. These are the devices we are most familiar with, such as smartphones, watches, appliances, and entertainment systems. Users insist on connecting many of these to their business networks to check email and sync calendars, while also browsing the Internet and checking on how many steps they have taken in the day.

The other two buckets are comprised of devices most consumers never see. 

Commercial IoT consists of things like inventory controls, device trackers, medical devices, and manufacturing systems. And lastly industrial IoT is comprised of things like meters, pumps, valves, pipeline monitors, and industrial control systems. There are enormous advantages and benefits associated with the deployment of devices from these two IoT buckets.  

But IoT presents some significant security challenges at the same time. Most IoT devices were not designed with security in mind—with little to no security configurability nor authentication or authorization protocols. And since most IoT devices are “headless,” security clients cannot be installed on them, making it virtually impossible to install patches or updates. It is no wonder that experts expect 25% of cyberattacks to target IoT in 2020 as well.

 2. Increased Cloud adoption. The Cloud is transforming how business is conducted. Over the next few years, as much as 92 percent of IT workloads will be processed by cloud data centers, with the remaining 8 percent continuing to be processed in traditional on-premises data centers. 

As Cloud services exist outside the perimeter and sightlines of traditional security solutions, a lack of consistent visibility and control makes them difficult to monitor and manage when it comes to security. Additionally, stewardship and responsibilities for the cloud remain unclear for many organizations, thus further complicating the picture.

The security challenges of the Cloud are real. The average enterprise has 76 different applications in use today. More and more organizations are adopting a multi-cloud strategy, with resources and workflows spanning across multiple IaaS and SaaS cloud providers. Forty nine percent of enterprises indicate that their adoption of Cloud services has been slowed due to the lack of cybersecurity skills in their organization. 

 3. Ransomware. It is rare for a day to pass without ransomware being in the top headlines. The total cost of ransomware topped one billion dollars in 2016, and some estimate that it may double that in 2017. 

In addition to becoming more malicious and brazen when it comes to ransomware attacks, cybercriminals with virtually no training at all can now participate by taking advantage of Ransomware-as-a-Service through cloud-based “franchises” that provide sophisticated hacking and ransom tools in exchange for a low upfront investment or a share of back-end profits.

With upwards of 4,000 ransomware attacks daily, infecting between 30,000 and 50,000 devices a month, the threat and impact is real. The biggest threat of ransomware, however, is not in the ransom amounts that are being paid, but rather in the downtime. Sixty three percent of businesses that reported a ransomware attack last year indicated they experienced business-threatening downtime. When it happens to healthcare and critical infrastructure providers, downtime can be life threatening. Of those organizations that reported an attack last year, 3.5 percent said lives were put at risk as a result.

4. Secure Socket Layers (SSL). Network traffic is growing exponentially and is beginning to overwhelm traditional security devices. But it is more than just traffic. Much of it is filled with confidential or sensitive data that is being encrypted using technologies such as SSL.

In fact, according to Fortinet’s Q2 Threat Landscape Report, over half of all network traffic today is encrypted, and that volume continues to grow at an annual rate of 20 percent.

 While SSL encryption protects a lot of data that passes over corporate networks, it is also used by cybercriminals to hide malware, network probes, and malicious traffic. This means that organizations must open and inspect each message and, assuming it isn’t malicious, then repackage it and sent on its way.

 Inspecting and repackaging SSL traffic is extremely resource intensive, and can create huge performance and bottleneck issues when security tools can’t keep up. As a result, organizations managing time and latency-sensitive data and applications are electing to either not encrypt critical traffic or inspect their encrypted traffic. Unfortunately, either of these options introduces substantial risk into an already complex threat landscape.

5. Cybersecurity skills shortage. Just as organizations are being required to tackle increasingly sophisticated and evolving cyberthreat challenges, they are also faced with a global shortage of skilled cybersecurity professionals. A survey conducted by the Information Systems Security Association (ISSA) and analyst firm Enterprise Strategy Group (ESG) revealed that 70% of organizations indicated that the global cybersecurity skills gap has impacted them, with 54% claiming they experienced a security event in the prior year as a result of having insufficient security staff or training. And the problem is going to get worse, with estimates that the shortage will grow to a 1.5 million-person shortfall globally by 2020, up from 1 million today.

And worse, these solutions tend to work in isolation from each other, having separate configuration and management consoles, and requiring manual intervention to correlate data between them in order to detect many threats. Integrating and managing the growing number of these disparate systems consumes valuable time and manpower, something that is already in short supply for most organizations.

Each of these challenges is daunting on their own. In aggregate they can be overwhelming. Organizations need to rethink their current strategy of deploying isolated security tools and instead adopt a consolidated approach that integrates and automates traditionally security technologies into a holistic security fabric that can span and adapt to today’s expanding and highly elastic networks, tracking and defending devices and data distributed anywhere across an organization’s ecosystem.
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