July 20, 2018, 9:58 am
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1 Philippine Peso = 0.0687 UAE Dirham
1 Philippine Peso = 2.01833 Albanian Lek
1 Philippine Peso = 0.03442 Neth Antilles Guilder
1 Philippine Peso = 0.51646 Argentine Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 0.02528 Australian Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.0333 Aruba Florin
1 Philippine Peso = 0.03741 Barbados Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 1.57108 Bangladesh Taka
1 Philippine Peso = 0.03151 Bulgarian Lev
1 Philippine Peso = 0.00707 Bahraini Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 32.75309 Burundi Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01871 Bermuda Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.02527 Brunei Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.12832 Bolivian Boliviano
1 Philippine Peso = 0.07203 Brazilian Real
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01871 Bahamian Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 1.27899 Bhutan Ngultrum
1 Philippine Peso = 0.19255 Botswana Pula
1 Philippine Peso = 374.4856 Belarus Ruble
1 Philippine Peso = 0.03737 Belize Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.02464 Canadian Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01868 Swiss Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 12.20576 Chilean Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 0.12563 Chinese Yuan
1 Philippine Peso = 53.5578 Colombian Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 10.55649 Costa Rica Colon
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01871 Cuban Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 1.77142 Cape Verde Escudo
1 Philippine Peso = 0.41506 Czech Koruna
1 Philippine Peso = 3.32024 Djibouti Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 0.11972 Danish Krone
1 Philippine Peso = 0.93303 Dominican Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 2.19981 Algerian Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.25129 Estonian Kroon
1 Philippine Peso = 0.33389 Egyptian Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 0.51106 Ethiopian Birr
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01606 Euro
1 Philippine Peso = 0.03917 Fiji Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01429 Falkland Islands Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01431 British Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 0.08962 Ghanaian Cedi
1 Philippine Peso = 0.88982 Gambian Dalasi
1 Philippine Peso = 168.66816 Guinea Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 0.14005 Guatemala Quetzal
1 Philippine Peso = 3.88103 Guyana Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.1468 Hong Kong Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.44747 Honduras Lempira
1 Philippine Peso = 0.1187 Croatian Kuna
1 Philippine Peso = 1.26057 Haiti Gourde
1 Philippine Peso = 5.20183 Hungarian Forint
1 Philippine Peso = 269.36027 Indonesian Rupiah
1 Philippine Peso = 0.06796 Israeli Shekel
1 Philippine Peso = 1.28159 Indian Rupee
1 Philippine Peso = 22.25963 Iraqi Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 813.69248 Iran Rial
1 Philippine Peso = 1.99588 Iceland Krona
1 Philippine Peso = 2.43547 Jamaican Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01325 Jordanian Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 2.11107 Japanese Yen
1 Philippine Peso = 1.8771 Kenyan Shilling
1 Philippine Peso = 1.27484 Kyrgyzstan Som
1 Philippine Peso = 75.70146 Cambodia Riel
1 Philippine Peso = 7.90311 Comoros Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 16.83502 North Korean Won
1 Philippine Peso = 21.15413 Korean Won
1 Philippine Peso = 0.00566 Kuwaiti Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01534 Cayman Islands Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 6.4508 Kazakhstan Tenge
1 Philippine Peso = 157.22035 Lao Kip
1 Philippine Peso = 28.15189 Lebanese Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 2.98915 Sri Lanka Rupee
1 Philippine Peso = 3.00412 Liberian Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.24822 Lesotho Loti
1 Philippine Peso = 0.05703 Lithuanian Lita
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01161 Latvian Lat
1 Philippine Peso = 0.02573 Libyan Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.17723 Moroccan Dirham
1 Philippine Peso = 0.31076 Moldovan Leu
1 Philippine Peso = 0.98373 Macedonian Denar
1 Philippine Peso = 26.78638 Myanmar Kyat
1 Philippine Peso = 45.80995 Mongolian Tugrik
1 Philippine Peso = 0.15122 Macau Pataca
1 Philippine Peso = 6.64048 Mauritania Ougulya
1 Philippine Peso = 0.64347 Mauritius Rupee
1 Philippine Peso = 0.29125 Maldives Rufiyaa
1 Philippine Peso = 13.40105 Malawi Kwacha
1 Philippine Peso = 0.35353 Mexican Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 0.07589 Malaysian Ringgit
1 Philippine Peso = 0.24819 Namibian Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 6.7153 Nigerian Naira
1 Philippine Peso = 0.58586 Nicaragua Cordoba
1 Philippine Peso = 0.15284 Norwegian Krone
1 Philippine Peso = 2.04293 Nepalese Rupee
1 Philippine Peso = 0.02753 New Zealand Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.00719 Omani Rial
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01871 Panama Balboa
1 Philippine Peso = 0.06114 Peruvian Nuevo Sol
1 Philippine Peso = 0.06073 Papua New Guinea Kina
1 Philippine Peso = 1 Philippine Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 2.39618 Pakistani Rupee
1 Philippine Peso = 0.0692 Polish Zloty
1 Philippine Peso = 106.97905 Paraguayan Guarani
1 Philippine Peso = 0.06809 Qatar Rial
1 Philippine Peso = 0.07472 Romanian New Leu
1 Philippine Peso = 1.18 Russian Rouble
1 Philippine Peso = 15.95267 Rwanda Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 0.07015 Saudi Arabian Riyal
1 Philippine Peso = 0.14747 Solomon Islands Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.25122 Seychelles Rupee
1 Philippine Peso = 0.33483 Sudanese Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 0.16573 Swedish Krona
1 Philippine Peso = 0.02554 Singapore Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.0143 St Helena Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 0.41538 Slovak Koruna
1 Philippine Peso = 153.38571 Sierra Leone Leone
1 Philippine Peso = 10.68088 Somali Shilling
1 Philippine Peso = 393.68313 Sao Tome Dobra
1 Philippine Peso = 0.16367 El Salvador Colon
1 Philippine Peso = 9.633 Syrian Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 0.24845 Swaziland Lilageni
1 Philippine Peso = 0.62252 Thai Baht
1 Philippine Peso = 0.04952 Tunisian Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.04351 Tongan paʻanga
1 Philippine Peso = 0.08966 Turkish Lira
1 Philippine Peso = 0.12587 Trinidad Tobago Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.57159 Taiwan Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 42.49906 Tanzanian Shilling
1 Philippine Peso = 0.49158 Ukraine Hryvnia
1 Philippine Peso = 69.56977 Ugandan Shilling
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01871 United States Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.58277 Uruguayan New Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 145.09914 Uzbekistan Sum
1 Philippine Peso = 2239.05724 Venezuelan Bolivar
1 Philippine Peso = 431.12608 Vietnam Dong
1 Philippine Peso = 2.04265 Vanuatu Vatu
1 Philippine Peso = 0.04883 Samoa Tala
1 Philippine Peso = 10.52881 CFA Franc (BEAC)
1 Philippine Peso = 0.05051 East Caribbean Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 10.52881 CFA Franc (BCEAO)
1 Philippine Peso = 1.90591 Pacific Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 4.67265 Yemen Riyal
1 Philippine Peso = 0.24818 South African Rand
1 Philippine Peso = 97.07258 Zambian Kwacha
1 Philippine Peso = 6.76955 Zimbabwe dollar

Experts say evolving cyberthreat landscape is getting more lethal: SUMIT BANSAL, SOPHOS

CYBERCRIME is getting to be more sophisticated and ransomware has emerged to be the most widespread and possibly the most lethal of the cyberthreats today. Sophos studies how that the threats are happening in the most unexpected places and how the attacks are unceasing.

Sophos is a global leader in cyber protection focused on business and enterprise. Though it has a free consumer software that is completely free and ready to use called Sophos Home, the company prefers to look at the commercial application because the truly damaging cyber threats attack enterprises, instead of individuals.

SumitBansal, Director for ASEAN and Korea for Sophos said in a Skype interview with Malaya Business Insight that cybercrime services have ceased to be “just a bunch of hackers trying to make a quick buck” but has emerged to become one of the most persistent and damaging cyber threats today.

“Cybercrime has gone from individual hackers, to small groups now to organized crime, and cybercrime services have evolved into a commodity that is freely sold on the Dark Web,” Bansal warns.

“Aside from ransomware, the trend that is causing concern among the cybersecurity community is the commoditization of the development and distribution of malware,” Bansal tells Malaya. He referred to how easy it was to do tasks like phishing because of how people in an organization may lack a security mindset.  

This new development called Cybercrime-as-a-Service (CaaS) was confirmed with the intrusive WannaCryransomware attack, which Sophos analyzed as an organized criminal activity. The ransomware started its infection on May 12 this year, penetrating over 230,000 computers in more than 150 countries within a day. The global financial and economic losses from that attack could swell into the billions of dollars, moving from a proof-of-concept to an actual “Mafia of malware,”making it one of the most damaging security incidents in the first half of 2017.

He also mentioned how cybercrime cost businesses huge sums of money. Cybersecurity Ventures, a leading global researcher and publisher covering the global cyber economy predicted that about US$6 trillion annually by 2021 will be lost to cybercrimes.

He also pointed to“spearphishing,” an accurate, targeted attack using Microsoft Office document attachments.Microsoft Word Intruder (MWI) malware hits the most innocent victims because an Office attachment seems to be always seen as safe or benign. MWI has used popular
MS Office exploits to get victims. But on CaaS platforms a non-Office exploit has been added to specifically target vulnerabilities in another popular on-board app, Adobe Flash Player. The malware can be bought online too.

“Attacks of this nature is particularly effective because there is always an unsuspecting person in an organization who will open an attachment,” Bansal pointed out adding that cybercriminals take advantage of these social engineering techniques. Sophos studies show that one in three targets will open their infected email thus providing an entry point for an attack.

Aside from MWI, Sophos Malware Forecast for 2017 Report mentioned three othercyber dangers related to social engineering, which in turn is directly related to CaaS. 

First, involves Linux malware exploiting Internet of Things (IoT) devices. The vulnerabilities of these devices lie in a loophole—they are not assigned passwords or people are too lazy to put in security into the devices as they are connected to the network. Attackers are increasingly using Linux security holes to target and infect Internet of Things (IoT) devices that include webcams to internet-connecting household appliances.

The second attack gate is Android applications. Again with an app, people who simply click on an interesting app opens a hole for a trojan or a worm. Android, being the larget mobile platform is particularly vulnerable.

“The problem with an app really is its ease to entry and the way people treat apps—they think that once it is on GooglePlay it is safe not realizing the malware could be in the update,” Bansal said. SophosLabs analysis systems processed more than 8.5million suspicious Android applications in 2016. More than half of them were either malware or potentially unwanted applications (PUA), including poorly behaved adware.

The popularity of Macs also offers a new attack surface. In an earlier article written by Bansal he mentioned how attackers copied the ransomware formula used in targeting Windows users to target Mac users as well. Mac malware focuses on exfiltrating data and providing covert remote access to thieves. He reiterated the same in this interviewing further citing that more and more Mac-specific malware is on the cybercrime marketplace.

 A CaaS site discovered by Sophos on the Dark Web has made the distribution of malware via weaponized documents available. CaaS players makes accessible to anyone who can pay in cold cash or in Bitcoins, tools and malware to hack other computers.

“It is really incredibly simple to attack, if users aren’t careful,” Bansal emphasized.

 Although many organizations have extensively adopted advanced prevention solutions, it is now important to consider a next-generation security solution that stops zero-day malware, unknown exploit variants and ransomware attacks that are sold by CaaS peddlers.

“Sophos has one single solution that is as simple as closing a door to an attack. It’s called Sophos Intercept X. The comprehensive abilities of this security solution has helped thwart CaaS because it stops the intrusion on multiple levels,” Bansal said.

The Intercept X security solution is crucial for businesses today, and the Sophos chief says it helps enterprises who lack the right level of security analytics skills or staff to perform security tasks to be both protected and ready to halt attacks, thus solving the weak link concern.

“With advanced protection and strong response capabilities in place, there is minimal need for specialized security consultants to administer the solution, thus enabling IT managers to focus on other important jobs without constantly worrying about the need to monitor the network for malicious activity,” he points out.
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