February 20, 2018, 4:10 pm
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1 Philippine Peso = 0.07035 UAE Dirham
1 Philippine Peso = 2.03736 Albanian Lek
1 Philippine Peso = 0.0341 Neth Antilles Guilder
1 Philippine Peso = 0.37852 Argentine Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 0.02417 Australian Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.0341 Aruba Florin
1 Philippine Peso = 0.03831 Barbados Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 1.58755 Bangladesh Taka
1 Philippine Peso = 0.03006 Bulgarian Lev
1 Philippine Peso = 0.00722 Bahraini Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 33.54368 Burundi Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01916 Bermuda Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.02532 Brunei Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.13142 Bolivian Boliviano
1 Philippine Peso = 0.06189 Brazilian Real
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01916 Bahamian Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 1.22893 Bhutan Ngultrum
1 Philippine Peso = 0.18046 Botswana Pula
1 Philippine Peso = 383.5249 Belarus Ruble
1 Philippine Peso = 0.03827 Belize Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.02404 Canadian Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01774 Swiss Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 11.3659 Chilean Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 0.12153 Chinese Yuan
1 Philippine Peso = 54.27203 Colombian Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 10.83966 Costa Rica Colon
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01916 Cuban Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 1.70268 Cape Verde Escudo
1 Philippine Peso = 0.39128 Czech Koruna
1 Philippine Peso = 3.38755 Djibouti Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 0.115 Danish Krone
1 Philippine Peso = 0.93544 Dominican Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 2.16856 Algerian Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.24138 Estonian Kroon
1 Philippine Peso = 0.33716 Egyptian Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 0.52165 Ethiopian Birr
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01543 Euro
1 Philippine Peso = 0.03813 Fiji Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01366 Falkland Islands Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01366 British Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 0.08656 Ghanaian Cedi
1 Philippine Peso = 0.89866 Gambian Dalasi
1 Philippine Peso = 172.37548 Guinea Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 0.14054 Guatemala Quetzal
1 Philippine Peso = 3.9364 Guyana Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.14982 Hong Kong Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.45019 Honduras Lempira
1 Philippine Peso = 0.11447 Croatian Kuna
1 Philippine Peso = 1.21437 Haiti Gourde
1 Philippine Peso = 4.80326 Hungarian Forint
1 Philippine Peso = 259.67432 Indonesian Rupiah
1 Philippine Peso = 0.06787 Israeli Shekel
1 Philippine Peso = 1.23063 Indian Rupee
1 Philippine Peso = 22.68199 Iraqi Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 709.84673 Iran Rial
1 Philippine Peso = 1.91667 Iceland Krona
1 Philippine Peso = 2.39444 Jamaican Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01355 Jordanian Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 2.03307 Japanese Yen
1 Philippine Peso = 1.93774 Kenyan Shilling
1 Philippine Peso = 1.30544 Kyrgyzstan Som
1 Philippine Peso = 76.53257 Cambodia Riel
1 Philippine Peso = 7.57567 Comoros Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 17.24138 North Korean Won
1 Philippine Peso = 20.41552 Korean Won
1 Philippine Peso = 0.00573 Kuwaiti Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01571 Cayman Islands Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 6.12088 Kazakhstan Tenge
1 Philippine Peso = 158.62069 Lao Kip
1 Philippine Peso = 28.83908 Lebanese Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 2.97165 Sri Lanka Rupee
1 Philippine Peso = 2.44272 Liberian Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.22308 Lesotho Loti
1 Philippine Peso = 0.0584 Lithuanian Lita
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01189 Latvian Lat
1 Philippine Peso = 0.02534 Libyan Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.17539 Moroccan Dirham
1 Philippine Peso = 0.31734 Moldovan Leu
1 Philippine Peso = 0.9454 Macedonian Denar
1 Philippine Peso = 25.42146 Myanmar Kyat
1 Philippine Peso = 45.82375 Mongolian Tugrik
1 Philippine Peso = 0.15425 Macau Pataca
1 Philippine Peso = 6.68582 Mauritania Ougulya
1 Philippine Peso = 0.61303 Mauritius Rupee
1 Philippine Peso = 0.29828 Maldives Rufiyaa
1 Philippine Peso = 13.66743 Malawi Kwacha
1 Philippine Peso = 0.35467 Mexican Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 0.07454 Malaysian Ringgit
1 Philippine Peso = 0.22274 Namibian Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 6.87739 Nigerian Naira
1 Philippine Peso = 0.59195 Nicaragua Cordoba
1 Philippine Peso = 0.14901 Norwegian Krone
1 Philippine Peso = 1.96697 Nepalese Rupee
1 Philippine Peso = 0.02593 New Zealand Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.00737 Omani Rial
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01916 Panama Balboa
1 Philippine Peso = 0.06225 Peruvian Nuevo Sol
1 Philippine Peso = 0.06025 Papua New Guinea Kina
1 Philippine Peso = 1 Philippine Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 2.11398 Pakistani Rupee
1 Philippine Peso = 0.0642 Polish Zloty
1 Philippine Peso = 106.68774 Paraguayan Guarani
1 Philippine Peso = 0.06973 Qatar Rial
1 Philippine Peso = 0.07198 Romanian New Leu
1 Philippine Peso = 1.08044 Russian Rouble
1 Philippine Peso = 16.10153 Rwanda Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 0.07184 Saudi Arabian Riyal
1 Philippine Peso = 0.14875 Solomon Islands Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.25546 Seychelles Rupee
1 Philippine Peso = 0.34393 Sudanese Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 0.15255 Swedish Krona
1 Philippine Peso = 0.02511 Singapore Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01367 St Helena Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 0.4254 Slovak Koruna
1 Philippine Peso = 146.16858 Sierra Leone Leone
1 Philippine Peso = 10.76628 Somali Shilling
1 Philippine Peso = 378.35439 Sao Tome Dobra
1 Philippine Peso = 0.16762 El Salvador Colon
1 Philippine Peso = 9.86552 Syrian Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 0.22276 Swaziland Lilageni
1 Philippine Peso = 0.59923 Thai Baht
1 Philippine Peso = 0.04546 Tunisian Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.04238 Tongan paʻanga
1 Philippine Peso = 0.07167 Turkish Lira
1 Philippine Peso = 0.12904 Trinidad Tobago Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.55669 Taiwan Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 43.02682 Tanzanian Shilling
1 Philippine Peso = 0.51715 Ukraine Hryvnia
1 Philippine Peso = 69.38697 Ugandan Shilling
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01916 United States Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.54521 Uruguayan New Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 156.47509 Uzbekistan Sum
1 Philippine Peso = 477.73945 Venezuelan Bolivar
1 Philippine Peso = 434.75095 Vietnam Dong
1 Philippine Peso = 2.01916 Vanuatu Vatu
1 Philippine Peso = 0.04802 Samoa Tala
1 Philippine Peso = 10.11303 CFA Franc (BEAC)
1 Philippine Peso = 0.05172 East Caribbean Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 10.11303 CFA Franc (BCEAO)
1 Philippine Peso = 1.81628 Pacific Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 4.78831 Yemen Riyal
1 Philippine Peso = 0.22279 South African Rand
1 Philippine Peso = 99.41571 Zambian Kwacha
1 Philippine Peso = 6.93295 Zimbabwe dollar

Driving the Mazda 6 SKYACTIV-D in Malaysia

DRIVING in Malaysia is always a memorable and fun experience. The first time I drove one, a Proton Saga, was in 1993 during the Tourism Malaysia and Malaysia Airlines 9-day Treasure Hunt which covered almost one-third of Malaysia. 

The first time I boarded the right-hand drive Proton and sat on the driver’s seat, my right hand automatically motioned to the right and touched the door handle as it had been an instinct for the right hand to grab the stick shift positioned to the right of the driver. Being used to left-hand drives and staying on right side of the road, I had the tendency then to go to the right side of the road especially when there were no other vehicles on the road. Quite confusing? I am sure you can relate when you have driven to right-hand drive countries like Malaysia, Indonesia, Thailand and England, to name a few.

The second time I drove right was in 1995 this time using a Proton Wira when my family and I spent a holiday in Kuala Lumpur, Malacca and Genting Highlands. Then in 2001 during the Southeast Asian Games in KL , I used a Ford Lynx for a few days reaching Malacca, too. The rest were mostly circuit drives at the Sepang International Circuit which gave a different kind of adrenaline especially when we did the Michelin Driving Experience in 2012.

Just recently, I had a chance to drive a Mazda 6 Diesel with SKYACTIV Technology made possible with a prompt coordination made by Bermaz Philippines with Bermaz Malaysia. Within an hour, I got a call from Mazda in KL and we were already talking about where would the best place to have the car delivered. To make the long story short, I was handed the car keys by Bermaz staff Vincent at a parking lot near the Bukit Jalil National Stadium where I headed using the Metro Rail Transport of Rapid KL. 

Although I have driven Mazda 6 Diesel in Thailand in a race track a few years back and also in Manila early this year, I still spent some minutes re-familiarizing myself with the controls, adjusted the side mirrors and the seats.

Driving from Bukit Jalil to our hotel in Kuala Lumpur, a good  35- 40 kms, I immediately felt the power of the car’s 2.2 L diesel engine. My colleague who became my instant navigator, Peter Paul Patrick Lucas, veteran reporter-writer of DZSR Sports Radio, said he never expected the car to be so quiet. Peter was also impressed with the convenience and comfort features of the car especially the power passenger seat and the fine leather.

We parked the car in a tight space at the hotel’s basement. The next day when I opened the car, I went straight to the left side and even sat but I just laughed after realizing the driver’s seat is on the right.

The car was a big help to us as we covered the 29th Southeast Asian Games in downtown KL and outside. On my first four days, I took the Grab and cab, the trains and the bus. The hotel personnel were always kind to book me a Grab and even accompanied me outside to get on the booked car. On the train, it was also convenient except that my bag was heavy with the laptop and camera it was quite tough walking long distances on transfers. But the bus and trains of Rapid KL gave the Games participants, volunteers and media complimentary passes as they were a transport partner of the event.

So when I got the car, it was like feeling at home and I could put the bag and extra clothes inside and drive almost anywhere with the help of Waze. The challenge really was not much about driving on the right side of the road but more of finding a parking space. At the Kuala Lumpur Convention Center or KLCC which is a walking distance to the famous Petronas Twin Towers, I was surprised that the entrance to its parking was like entering a wide highway tunnel but upon seeing maybe four or five automated ticket machines and stop bars, I felt assured I was entering the convention building and mall parking. As parking for both seems integrated and always full, it was hard to find a slot right away. I found one but after I had parked I saw the sign that maximum time for parking was only for two hours and I took it to mean that I should go back to the car before the time expires. We were nearing the conclusion of the Games and Peter and I decided to drive to Genting Highlands the day before our flight back to Manila. The last time I stayed in Genting was in 2003 when I covered the Rainforest Challenge Malaysia and I was curious about the improvements in the popular tourist spot. It was Peter’s first time in Malaysia and seeing a place outside KL was a bonus for him.

Starting out at 9 am, traffic was light to moderate. We took the highways until Waze instructed us to enter a route going uphill and this was the same route my family and I took in 1995. Narrow, zigzag road and very few oncoming vehicles. The Mazda 6 was an ideal car in this twisty terrain and even if the car had five passengers, I was sure it could easily take the challenge with its 2.2L  twin-turbo diesel mill churning out 173 hp at 4,500 rpm and 420 Nm of torque at 2,000 rpm. Its six-speed SkyActiv-Drive automatic gearbox kept me worry-free about the shifts.

After almost two hours, we were making our way to the Genting Highlands and Resort which we would learn later was in the Guinness Book of Records 2015 as the world’s largest hotel. Again, parking was a problem initially until we found several slots in a newly constructed parking building connected to the resort. For the limited time we had, we chose to have a ramen lunch then took the 30-minute out- and-back cable car ride, perhaps the resort’s main attraction these days. The ride offered fascinating views of Genting, the forests and the roads below. It was also like having the Baguio weather up there.

We had coffee at Starbucks before going back to KL for a scheduled interview with Al Jazeera news agency in the afternoon.

We took a different route this time, mostly the tollwayswhich gave us more opportunities to experience the smooth power and other features of the 6. The car has Blind Spot Monitoring (BSM), Rear Cross Traffic Alert (RCTA), Lane Departure Warning (LDWS) and Lane Keep Assist (LKA). Now we could do 105- 110 kph with other cars along the fast lanes and the LDWS and LKA offered good assists. Of course, the 6 can do a lot more but I decided to be on the moderate speed.

I need not talk about the car’s excellent audio entertainment system with Bose speakers but I should mention about the car’s fuel efficient engine. We had a full tank at the start of our six-day drive and after completing the Genting drive, we still had close to a half tank and more than enough fuel for Vincent to take us to the far Kuala Lumpur International Airport in Sepang on our last day. Indeed, a Mazda 6 SKYACTIV-D memorable drive!
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