November 22, 2017, 11:32 am
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1 Philippine Peso = 0.07222 UAE Dirham
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1 Philippine Peso = 0.035 Neth Antilles Guilder
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1 Philippine Peso = 0.06405 Brazilian Real
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1 Philippine Peso = 1.28171 Bhutan Ngultrum
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1 Philippine Peso = 0.0252 Canadian Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01953 Swiss Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 12.51721 Chilean Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 0.13055 Chinese Yuan
1 Philippine Peso = 59.27237 Colombian Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 11.06096 Costa Rica Colon
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01967 Cuban Peso
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1 Philippine Peso = 0.93215 Dominican Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 2.25679 Algerian Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.26216 Estonian Kroon
1 Philippine Peso = 0.34612 Egyptian Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 0.53196 Ethiopian Birr
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01676 Euro
1 Philippine Peso = 0.0411 Fiji Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01485 Falkland Islands Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01485 British Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 0.09043 Ghanaian Cedi
1 Philippine Peso = 0.92566 Gambian Dalasi
1 Philippine Peso = 176.89283 Guinea Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 0.14439 Guatemala Quetzal
1 Philippine Peso = 4.01731 Guyana Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.15359 Hong Kong Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.46264 Honduras Lempira
1 Philippine Peso = 0.12608 Croatian Kuna
1 Philippine Peso = 1.21691 Haiti Gourde
1 Philippine Peso = 5.23442 Hungarian Forint
1 Philippine Peso = 266.33236 Indonesian Rupiah
1 Philippine Peso = 0.06904 Israeli Shekel
1 Philippine Peso = 1.28012 Indian Rupee
1 Philippine Peso = 22.94985 Iraqi Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 692.86138 Iran Rial
1 Philippine Peso = 2.03638 Iceland Krona
1 Philippine Peso = 2.46903 Jamaican Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01391 Jordanian Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 2.2151 Japanese Yen
1 Philippine Peso = 2.03441 Kenyan Shilling
1 Philippine Peso = 1.37082 Kyrgyzstan Som
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1 Philippine Peso = 17.69912 North Korean Won
1 Philippine Peso = 21.59685 Korean Won
1 Philippine Peso = 0.00593 Kuwaiti Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01613 Cayman Islands Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 6.50443 Kazakhstan Tenge
1 Philippine Peso = 163.16618 Lao Kip
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1 Philippine Peso = 2.44897 Liberian Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.2763 Lesotho Loti
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1 Philippine Peso = 0.0122 Latvian Lat
1 Philippine Peso = 0.02689 Libyan Dinar
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1 Philippine Peso = 0.34307 Moldovan Leu
1 Philippine Peso = 1.02635 Macedonian Denar
1 Philippine Peso = 26.80433 Myanmar Kyat
1 Philippine Peso = 47.94494 Mongolian Tugrik
1 Philippine Peso = 0.15822 Macau Pataca
1 Philippine Peso = 6.90266 Mauritania Ougulya
1 Philippine Peso = 0.6647 Mauritius Rupee
1 Philippine Peso = 0.30619 Maldives Rufiyaa
1 Philippine Peso = 14.0885 Malawi Kwacha
1 Philippine Peso = 0.37348 Mexican Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 0.08155 Malaysian Ringgit
1 Philippine Peso = 0.27622 Namibian Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 7.00098 Nigerian Naira
1 Philippine Peso = 0.60177 Nicaragua Cordoba
1 Philippine Peso = 0.16317 Norwegian Krone
1 Philippine Peso = 2.03638 Nepalese Rupee
1 Philippine Peso = 0.02891 New Zealand Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.00756 Omani Rial
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01967 Panama Balboa
1 Philippine Peso = 0.06359 Peruvian Nuevo Sol
1 Philippine Peso = 0.06374 Papua New Guinea Kina
1 Philippine Peso = 1 Philippine Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 2.06568 Pakistani Rupee
1 Philippine Peso = 0.07087 Polish Zloty
1 Philippine Peso = 110.87513 Paraguayan Guarani
1 Philippine Peso = 0.07473 Qatar Rial
1 Philippine Peso = 0.07785 Romanian New Leu
1 Philippine Peso = 1.16841 Russian Rouble
1 Philippine Peso = 16.36755 Rwanda Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 0.07374 Saudi Arabian Riyal
1 Philippine Peso = 0.15449 Solomon Islands Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.26735 Seychelles Rupee
1 Philippine Peso = 0.13097 Sudanese Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 0.16686 Swedish Krona
1 Philippine Peso = 0.0267 Singapore Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01486 St Helena Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 0.4367 Slovak Koruna
1 Philippine Peso = 149.85251 Sierra Leone Leone
1 Philippine Peso = 10.99312 Somali Shilling
1 Philippine Peso = 410.64307 Sao Tome Dobra
1 Philippine Peso = 0.17207 El Salvador Colon
1 Philippine Peso = 10.12743 Syrian Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 0.27624 Swaziland Lilageni
1 Philippine Peso = 0.64562 Thai Baht
1 Philippine Peso = 0.04905 Tunisian Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.04547 Tongan paʻanga
1 Philippine Peso = 0.07723 Turkish Lira
1 Philippine Peso = 0.13037 Trinidad Tobago Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.59133 Taiwan Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 43.93314 Tanzanian Shilling
1 Philippine Peso = 0.51976 Ukraine Hryvnia
1 Philippine Peso = 71.28811 Ugandan Shilling
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01967 United States Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.57699 Uruguayan New Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 158.89873 Uzbekistan Sum
1 Philippine Peso = 0.19617 Venezuelan Bolivar
1 Philippine Peso = 446.39136 Vietnam Dong
1 Philippine Peso = 2.10089 Vanuatu Vatu
1 Philippine Peso = 0.05108 Samoa Tala
1 Philippine Peso = 10.98368 CFA Franc (BEAC)
1 Philippine Peso = 0.0531 East Caribbean Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 10.988 CFA Franc (BCEAO)
1 Philippine Peso = 1.98682 Pacific Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 4.91504 Yemen Riyal
1 Philippine Peso = 0.2763 South African Rand
1 Philippine Peso = 102.05507 Zambian Kwacha
1 Philippine Peso = 7.11701 Zimbabwe dollar

Bobby Mañosa; Quintessential Filipino architect

Architect Francisco “Bobby” Mañosa, known for his Filipino design philosophy, is passing on to his children a legacy that would  transcend time.

Six decades and 50 landmark projects  will not define Bobby’s illustrious career as the next-generation Mañosas are bent on carrying  the torch for Philippine architecture their father championed.

“I design Filipino, nothing else,”  was Bobby’s mantra as a celebrated architect. This mantra set him apart from the rest. 

From conceptualizing the Coconut Palace, to creating the EDSA Shrine, to designing Amanpulo, Pearl Farm, the LRT and other iconic Filipino landmarks, Bobby Mañosa has always taken his country and his craft seriously – to the point of turning down potentially lucrative projects simply because they were not in line with his philosophy that “architecture must be true to itself, its land and its people.”

 “That means Philippine architecture for the Philippines,” said Francisco  Jr. or Dino,  CEO of the Mañosa Group of Companies, and founder and CEO of Mañosa Properties, the group’s real estate arm.

“The vision for the company moving forward will really be how we can make Philippine architecture, or that philosophy, relevant today,” Dino said.

Dino said the Group always goes  back to the design philosophy of the bahay kubo  (nipa hut) which later became the bahay na bato, then into what is today’s Philippine modern architecture.

Bobby in previous interviews described the bahay kubo as the original sustainable house that embodies the principles of climate-conscious architecture. 

Built from readily available sustainable materials, the bahay kubo has distinct features: a high pitched thatch roof that insulates the interior from the heat of the sun and rain and stilts design for cross ventilation  laterally (from the large windows) and vertically (from the “silong” or basement).

Much  like the industrialists of his generation, Bobby contributed to nation-building through his architecture, which is  distinctively Filipino.

“Had he been a cook or a chef, he would have probably just cooked Filipino food or put up a Filipino restaurant,” Dino added.

Today, the Mañosa   Group keeps the vision alive in its different companies and different divisions, always looking at how to Filipinize to promote Filipino design and architecture. By doing so, the Mañosa siblings hope to inspire others to do the same.

According to  Dino, the Group  furthers their inspiration of the bahay kubo by modernizing that design to today’s needs, taking into consideration the requirements of the end-user and the contour of the land.

Miguel Angelo Mañosa, CEO of Mañosa and Co. Inc. and managing partner of A. Mañosa + Architects, said in any residential  or commercial project, true to their spirit, they always begin with the bahay kubo.

“We believe there is still much to learn with regards to the fundamentals of the house. We adapt these fundamentals in every design we do, be it a commercial, institutional, ecclesiastical or residential development. We believe learning from the past is the best way to design for the future,” Gelo added.

Bambi Mañosa-Tanjutco, director of Interior Design at Mañosa and Co., also still applies several of her father’s trademark design features in every project that they take on.

In her projects, Bambi upgrades local materials and applies them in different forms to accent walls, counters and cabinetry, to furniture and soft furnishings, fabrics etc.

She also introduces the “banggerahan” concept in the kitchen which is a typical feature in a bahay kubo.

Bambi provides  little  touches of Filipino design in  the interiors,   incorporating plants and floor lamps and using only warm white lights.

Dino said  there could be a misnomer that Bobby Mañosa only designs out of sawali and bamboo. He also dispels common notion that today, these materials are no longer relevant.

According to  Dino, his father would always try to push the use modern bamboo flooring  or modern bamboo wall not just because they are indigenous materials.

“There was a reason why he chose that. It was really because bamboo (is) the greenest type of material you can use anywhere and he loved the use of it. He wanted to uplift the material to let people accept it: that bamboo or rattan is not just for the poor or the farmer but it can be enjoyed by presidents and kings and tycoons,” Dino said.

And this still holds true for Mañosa ’s projects whether that’d be Mañosa Properties or in the architectural department or the furniture.

Dino laments the fact that some Filipinos have stopped  designing for the Filipino climate, or worse, for the Filipino culture due in part to the many influences of Western architecture.

Gelo added: ”I believe that the Filipino’s sense of national pride has changed. This has influenced their taste in architecture.”

The Mañosas constantly look for ways to incorporate new designs, new elements still with the Filipino culture and the bahay kubo in mind.

In fact, Dino believes the basic elements of bahay  kubo to this day remain extremely viable -- from the long eaves to cross ventilation to local materials, if possible.” All that is very viable.”

Gelo said over the years, there has been much innovation in materials since his father’s  time.

“Today, there are so many choices, the limit would just be your imagination. We use these new material innovations to our advantage by coming up with creative designs which complement our architecture and interior design,” Gelo said.

Dino added: “We always innovate to today’s technology, what’s available out in  the market. That’s always a thinking process that all the designers go through.”

For Dino there is no one project that can embody the group’s brand image because of the many types of Philippine architecture projects the Group has done.

“You can go very indigenous like the Pearl Farm or you can go very modern sleek like Amanpulo. And you can go very pure and creative like the Coconut Palace,” he said.

But for Dino, the next project will always be better than the last one.

 For Bambi, Amanpulo and Campanilla Lane typify the contemporary while Pearl Farm, Eskaya and the Mañosa residence are the showcase projects for the vernacular.

Today, the Mañosa Group is pushing an advocacy very close to the improvement of Filipino design. The Group supports local weavers and craftsmen and help them level up their products to be acceptable in its projects. Typically, it supports local craftsmen from the areas where its projects are located.

Through its foundation TUKOD, the Mañosa Group creates centers and spaces for less fortunate children. It also mentors future leaders by exposing and inspiring them to lead projects that they wish to support through its K4K – or Kids for Kids – youth advocacy.

To celebrate Bobby’s  more than six decades of his legacy, an exhibit dubbed “Mañosa: Beyond Architecture’ runs until May at the National Museum of the Philippines. The exhibit showcases over 50 landmark projects from Bobby’s prolific career, including original drawings and models never before seen by the public. Archived photographs, samples of vernacular materials, furniture, and interior elements, are also featured. The exhibition also explores Bobby’s other creative pursuits as a jazz musician, toy designer, and designer of craft. 
 
To further inspire new and upcoming generations of Filipino architects and designers, a lecture series runs concurrently with the exhibit, on selected Saturdays from until May 6, 1:30 to 5:30 p.m. at the National Museum Auditorium.  
 
The “Mañosa: Beyond Architecture” lecture series includes topics on art, architecture and design, Philippine textiles and building materials, Filipino culture and identity, nationalism and nation-building.
 
 
 
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