December 12, 2017, 7:01 am
Facebook iconTwitter iconYouTube iconGoogle+ icon

AWS REINVENT 2017;

TRENDS in customer experiences have moved towards employing chatbots and roboadvisers, systems that require an interaction beyond the keyboard. Amazon Web Services (AWS) has just launched three language oriented services at the annual reInvent conference.

Amazon Translate, Transcribe and Comprehend are all aimed adding functionality to applications and well as integrate them with other AWS services such as the Amazon Lex, Polly and Rekognition. These new services are up on the company’s on-demand Cloud computing platform either as previews except for Comprehend which is already available.

Created for those developers who are not experts in machine learning, but are interested in using these technologies to build a new class of apps that exhibit human-like intelligence the new services provide high-quality, high-accuracy machine learning services that are scalable and cost-effective.

No less than AWS CEO Andy Jassy introduced the three services in his keynote which were highlighted by actual implementations of the services.  

“Today, customers are storing more data than ever before, using Amazon Simple Storage Service (Amazon S3) as their scalable, reliable, and secure data lake. These customers want to put this data to use for their organization and customers, and to do so they need easy-to-use tools and technologies to unlock the intelligence residing within this data,” Swami Sivasubramanian, VP of Machine Learning, AWS explained.

Amazon Translate, available in preview on the AWS platform, uses state of the art neural machine translation techniques to provide highly accurate translation of text from one language to another. Amazon Translate can translate short or long-form text and supports translation between English and six other languages (Arabic, French, German, Portuguese, Simplified Chinese, and Spanish), with many more to come in 2018.

Amazon Transcribe converts speech to text, allowing developers to turn audio files stored in Amazon S3 into accurate, fully punctuated text. Amazon Transcribe has been trained to handle even low fidelity audio, such as contact center recordings, with a high degree of accuracy. Amazon Transcribe can generate a time stamp for every word so that developers can precisely align the text with the source file. Today, Amazon Transcribe supports English and Spanish with more languages to follow. In the coming months, AmazonTranscribe will have the ability to recognize multiple speakers in an audio file, and will also allow developers to upload custom vocabulary for more accurate transcription for those words. It is available only in preview mode to developers.

Amazon Comprehend, released during the reInvent conference last November 28, can understand natural language text from documents, social network posts, articles, or any other textual data stored in AWS. Amazon Comprehend uses deep learning techniques to identify text entities (e.g. people, places, dates, organizations), the language the text is written in, the sentiment expressed in the text, and key phrases with concepts and adjectives, such as ‘beautiful,’ ‘warm,’ or ‘sunny.’ Amazon Comprehend has been trained on a wide range of datasets, including product descriptions and customer reviews from Amazon.com, to build best-in-class language models that extract key insights from text. It also has a topic modeling capability that helps applications extract common topics from a corpus of documents. Amazon Comprehend integrates with AWS Glue to enable end-to-end analytics of text data stored in Amazon S3, Amazon Redshift, Amazon Relational Database Service (Amazon RDS), Amazon DynamoDB, or other popular Amazon data sources.

In addition to the text and speech recognition and translation service, AWS also launed a new video platform that upgrades from Rekognition, which is an image recognition service.

Amazon Rekognition Video can track people, detect activities, and recognize objects, faces, celebrities, and inappropriate content in millions of videos stored in Amazon S3. It also provides real-time facial recognition across millions of faces for live stream videos. Amazon Rekognition Video’s easy-to-use API is powered by computer vision models that are trained to accurately detect thousands of objects and activities, and extract motion-based context from both live video streams and video content stored in Amazon S3. Amazon Rekognition Video can automatically tag specific sections of video with labels and locations (e.g. beach, sun, child), detect activities (e.g. running, jumping, swimming), detect, recognize, and analyze faces, and track multiple people, even if they are partially hidden from view in the video.

“We’re excited to deliver four new machine learning application services that will help developers immediately start creating a new generation of intelligent apps that can see, hear, speak, and interact with the world around them.”
Rating: 
No votes yet

Column of the Day

The Silence breakers

By ABIGAIL VALTE | December 12,2017
‘There are still thousands who cannot afford to come out and stand against these monsters without risking the fragile fabric of their lives.’

Opinion of the Day

Duplicity

By REY O. ARCILLA | December 12, 2017
‘Today, President Digong brought us to a position where we can stand tall as an independent country, with our dignity back and not the lapdog of anyone. – Gen. Sotelo’