May 21, 2018, 12:57 pm
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1 Philippine Peso = 0.07026 UAE Dirham
1 Philippine Peso = 2.05873 Albanian Lek
1 Philippine Peso = 0.03425 Neth Antilles Guilder
1 Philippine Peso = 0.46453 Argentine Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 0.02544 Australian Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.03405 Aruba Florin
1 Philippine Peso = 0.03826 Barbados Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 1.60723 Bangladesh Taka
1 Philippine Peso = 0.0317 Bulgarian Lev
1 Philippine Peso = 0.00722 Bahraini Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 33.49876 Burundi Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01913 Bermuda Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.02542 Brunei Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.13124 Bolivian Boliviano
1 Philippine Peso = 0.07071 Brazilian Real
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01913 Bahamian Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 1.2952 Bhutan Ngultrum
1 Philippine Peso = 0.18932 Botswana Pula
1 Philippine Peso = 383.01129 Belarus Ruble
1 Philippine Peso = 0.03822 Belize Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.02451 Canadian Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01912 Swiss Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 12.10044 Chilean Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 0.12185 Chinese Yuan
1 Philippine Peso = 55.53664 Colombian Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 10.74517 Costa Rica Colon
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01913 Cuban Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 1.78535 Cape Verde Escudo
1 Philippine Peso = 0.41378 Czech Koruna
1 Philippine Peso = 3.39105 Djibouti Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 0.12057 Danish Krone
1 Philippine Peso = 0.94701 Dominican Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 2.21703 Algerian Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.25324 Estonian Kroon
1 Philippine Peso = 0.33977 Egyptian Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 0.52037 Ethiopian Birr
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01619 Euro
1 Philippine Peso = 0.03941 Fiji Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01415 Falkland Islands Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01416 British Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 0.08822 Ghanaian Cedi
1 Philippine Peso = 0.89669 Gambian Dalasi
1 Philippine Peso = 172.1829 Guinea Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 0.14035 Guatemala Quetzal
1 Philippine Peso = 3.96537 Guyana Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.15017 Hong Kong Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.45456 Honduras Lempira
1 Philippine Peso = 0.11944 Croatian Kuna
1 Philippine Peso = 1.20911 Haiti Gourde
1 Philippine Peso = 5.13067 Hungarian Forint
1 Philippine Peso = 270.32715 Indonesian Rupiah
1 Philippine Peso = 0.06863 Israeli Shekel
1 Philippine Peso = 1.30065 Indian Rupee
1 Philippine Peso = 22.65162 Iraqi Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 803.52018 Iran Rial
1 Philippine Peso = 1.99541 Iceland Krona
1 Philippine Peso = 2.38971 Jamaican Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01355 Jordanian Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 2.12078 Japanese Yen
1 Philippine Peso = 1.9141 Kenyan Shilling
1 Philippine Peso = 1.31014 Kyrgyzstan Som
1 Philippine Peso = 77.4823 Cambodia Riel
1 Philippine Peso = 7.95542 Comoros Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 17.21829 North Korean Won
1 Philippine Peso = 20.58408 Korean Won
1 Philippine Peso = 0.00578 Kuwaiti Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01569 Cayman Islands Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 6.27415 Kazakhstan Tenge
1 Philippine Peso = 159.05873 Lao Kip
1 Philippine Peso = 28.79281 Lebanese Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 3.0199 Sri Lanka Rupee
1 Philippine Peso = 2.55519 Liberian Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.24106 Lesotho Loti
1 Philippine Peso = 0.05833 Lithuanian Lita
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01187 Latvian Lat
1 Philippine Peso = 0.02592 Libyan Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.18009 Moroccan Dirham
1 Philippine Peso = 0.31752 Moldovan Leu
1 Philippine Peso = 0.9912 Macedonian Denar
1 Philippine Peso = 25.82743 Myanmar Kyat
1 Philippine Peso = 45.91544 Mongolian Tugrik
1 Philippine Peso = 0.15467 Macau Pataca
1 Philippine Peso = 6.77253 Mauritania Ougulya
1 Philippine Peso = 0.65812 Mauritius Rupee
1 Philippine Peso = 0.29788 Maldives Rufiyaa
1 Philippine Peso = 13.65028 Malawi Kwacha
1 Philippine Peso = 0.37609 Mexican Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 0.07594 Malaysian Ringgit
1 Philippine Peso = 0.2393 Namibian Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 6.84905 Nigerian Naira
1 Philippine Peso = 0.60003 Nicaragua Cordoba
1 Philippine Peso = 0.15524 Norwegian Krone
1 Philippine Peso = 2.07193 Nepalese Rupee
1 Philippine Peso = 0.02769 New Zealand Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.00736 Omani Rial
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01913 Panama Balboa
1 Philippine Peso = 0.06261 Peruvian Nuevo Sol
1 Philippine Peso = 0.06237 Papua New Guinea Kina
1 Philippine Peso = 1 Philippine Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 2.21159 Pakistani Rupee
1 Philippine Peso = 0.06942 Polish Zloty
1 Philippine Peso = 107.26994 Paraguayan Guarani
1 Philippine Peso = 0.06963 Qatar Rial
1 Philippine Peso = 0.07496 Romanian New Leu
1 Philippine Peso = 1.18388 Russian Rouble
1 Philippine Peso = 16.19304 Rwanda Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 0.07174 Saudi Arabian Riyal
1 Philippine Peso = 0.14965 Solomon Islands Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.25694 Seychelles Rupee
1 Philippine Peso = 0.34351 Sudanese Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 0.16686 Swedish Krona
1 Philippine Peso = 0.02567 Singapore Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01416 St Helena Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 0.42483 Slovak Koruna
1 Philippine Peso = 149.22518 Sierra Leone Leone
1 Philippine Peso = 10.771 Somali Shilling
1 Philippine Peso = 396.71513 Sao Tome Dobra
1 Philippine Peso = 0.1674 El Salvador Colon
1 Philippine Peso = 9.85231 Syrian Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 0.23938 Swaziland Lilageni
1 Philippine Peso = 0.61427 Thai Baht
1 Philippine Peso = 0.04806 Tunisian Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.04443 Tongan paʻanga
1 Philippine Peso = 0.0851 Turkish Lira
1 Philippine Peso = 0.12721 Trinidad Tobago Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.57216 Taiwan Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 43.52401 Tanzanian Shilling
1 Philippine Peso = 0.5001 Ukraine Hryvnia
1 Philippine Peso = 71.05414 Ugandan Shilling
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01913 United States Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.58772 Uruguayan New Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 153.05146 Uzbekistan Sum
1 Philippine Peso = 1335.85231 Venezuelan Bolivar
1 Philippine Peso = 435.89057 Vietnam Dong
1 Philippine Peso = 2.09853 Vanuatu Vatu
1 Philippine Peso = 0.04966 Samoa Tala
1 Philippine Peso = 10.60895 CFA Franc (BEAC)
1 Philippine Peso = 0.05165 East Caribbean Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 10.60895 CFA Franc (BCEAO)
1 Philippine Peso = 1.92175 Pacific Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 4.78095 Yemen Riyal
1 Philippine Peso = 0.23941 South African Rand
1 Philippine Peso = 99.28257 Zambian Kwacha
1 Philippine Peso = 6.92367 Zimbabwe dollar

Weaponizing Janet Napoles

FOR three years and nine months, Janet Napoles has been living her life detained in various cells, all of them a far cry from the luxury and comfort she and her family had grown accustomed to since Napoles’ “business” started booming in 1998. 

I first met Janet Napoles when she surrendered to former President Noynoy Aquino in 2013, which was facilitated by her former lawyer, Atty. Lorna Kapunan. Aquino was criticized for allowing Napoles to surrender to him, with some saying that it reeked of special treatment. While I have a vivid recollection of what transpired during that time, what stands out is Napoles’ vehement denial of the accusations against her, saying that media reports of her ostentatious wealth were severely exaggerated.

From where I was standing, I could see that this woman who had been dubbed “Pork Scam Queen” by the media had a certain guile about her. She tried to turn on the charm, so to speak, and pleaded her case to anyone who would listen. By all accounts, the woman was used to getting her way; after all, she had hobnobbed with politicians in the highest echelons of power, and had throngs of staff to cater to her every whim. (Even as she emerged from her mother’s mausoleum in Heritage Park on the night of her surrender, she was accompanied by a female assistant who carried her bags.) She had a fleet of luxury vehicles ready to whisk her off to wherever she wished, and money had apparently been no issue when it came to living the privileged life. The public was outraged at the ostentatious display of wealth by the Napoleses, so much so that her youngest daughter Jean was vilified for months because of flaunting sports cars, designer shoes and bags, and all the glitzy parties she threw, on social media.

Unfortunately for the elder Napoles, Aquino only had a stony stare in return for her efforts to engage him, and despite her pleas, she was off to Camp Crame to await instructions from the Court about her incarceration, as she already had a standing warrant for her arrest.

Her transfer from Camp Crame to Makati City Jail was slightly delayed when she complained of chest pains and difficulty with breathing, and asked that she be brought to a hospital in Bonifacio Global City before being sent to Makati City Jail. Then Interior and Local Government Secretary Mar Roxas put his foot down and denied the request by saying “hindi ito drive through.”

The woman who could talk (and buy) her way out of anything was told point-blank that she couldn’t have what she wanted. I could see the consternation on her face when she was told that she would be examined by the PNP doctor, and the results reported to her personal physician via telephone. Perhaps, she thought, the jig was finally up.

I imagine that she stewed over this moment, and other perceived slights, many a time during her continued incarceration. Once the toast of the town, her fall from grace was slow and brutal, with many of her politician friends disowning any sort of relationship with her. It had become so toxic to be associated with the Napoleses that even a photo with her would be hurriedly disavowed by public officials and broadcasters alike. “Fair weathered friends,” she must have thought to herself while sitting in her overcrowded cell, thinking of all the times she was asked to be a principal sponsor at weddings because of the lavish gifts she’d give. And well, because times were great.

But now, Napoles is seeing light at the end of the tunnel. Her conviction for serious illegal detention has been overturned by the Court of Appeals, after Solicitor General Jose Calida intervened on behalf of the Republic. Talks of her turning state witness in the plunder cases have been confirmed by Calida himself and Justice Secretary Vitaliano Aguirre. Just yesterday, Napoles’s lawyer, Atty. Stephen David (whose wife was appointed as Deputy Commissioner at the Bureau of Internal Revenue) revealed in an interview that Aquino, Roxas, former Budget Secretary Butch Abad and Senator Frank Drilon will be implicated by his client in the PDAF scam.

Presidential spokesperson Ernesto Abella continues to deny through his teeth that there has been a favorable change in how the Duterte administration intends to treat Napoles and her cases, but so far, the actions of Calida and Aguirre belie this claim. The assumption by these officials is that Napoles was the least guilty in the entire scheme, never mind that it was her who put up the spurious non-governmental organizations that enabled lawmakers to funnel PDAF funds into their own accounts.

Make no mistake about it, but should the current administration be inclined to go after its predecessor, weaponizing a loathed figure like Napoles is one way to do it. In the era of post-truth, it will not matter whether or not there is actual evidence against these men, just that Napoles’ finger is pointing in their direction. Trial balloons have already been released to gauge public reaction to Napoles: she was allegedly a victim of extortion by Senator Leila de Lima when the latter served as Secretary of Justice.

I’m no Oracle of Delphi, but it will only get hairier by the minute once Napoles starts talking. Expect the list of legislators who supposedly worked with Napoles to siphon PDAF funds to resurface, this time with an unmistakable political tinge. Expect that whatever bombshells Napoles has in her arsenal, none of these will be detonated in the direction of Bongbong Marcos, despite Benhur Luy’s identification of Marcos as one of the lawmakers who supposedly participated in Napoles’ scheme.

So it begs the question: what does Janet know, and what is Janet willing to say against the people who put her behind bars in the first place in exchange for a return to her old life?


ALL ABOUT ABIGAIL
Issues facing government are not always about two sides. Abigail Valte’s law background and deep dive into government provides insight on its inner workings and what factors go into policy decision making. Her once a week column is an incision on current political and social issues.
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