October 23, 2017, 8:28 am
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1 Philippine Peso = 0.07128 UAE Dirham
1 Philippine Peso = 2.18168 Albanian Lek
1 Philippine Peso = 0.0346 Neth Antilles Guilder
1 Philippine Peso = 0.33849 Argentine Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 0.02474 Australian Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.03455 Aruba Florin
1 Philippine Peso = 0.03882 Barbados Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 1.59705 Bangladesh Taka
1 Philippine Peso = 0.03208 Bulgarian Lev
1 Philippine Peso = 0.00732 Bahraini Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 33.78397 Burundi Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01941 Bermuda Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.02639 Brunei Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.13315 Bolivian Boliviano
1 Philippine Peso = 0.06146 Brazilian Real
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01941 Bahamian Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 1.26213 Bhutan Ngultrum
1 Philippine Peso = 0.20042 Botswana Pula
1 Philippine Peso = 388.58696 Belarus Ruble
1 Philippine Peso = 0.03878 Belize Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.02429 Canadian Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01906 Swiss Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 12.12442 Chilean Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 0.1285 Chinese Yuan
1 Philippine Peso = 56.61879 Colombian Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 10.99029 Costa Rica Colon
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01941 Cuban Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 1.81172 Cape Verde Escudo
1 Philippine Peso = 0.42217 Czech Koruna
1 Philippine Peso = 3.44992 Djibouti Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 0.12229 Danish Krone
1 Philippine Peso = 0.91751 Dominican Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 2.21396 Algerian Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.25699 Estonian Kroon
1 Philippine Peso = 0.34161 Egyptian Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 0.52232 Ethiopian Birr
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01642 Euro
1 Philippine Peso = 0.03984 Fiji Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01474 Falkland Islands Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01481 British Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 0.08518 Ghanaian Cedi
1 Philippine Peso = 0.91421 Gambian Dalasi
1 Philippine Peso = 174.2236 Guinea Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 0.14253 Guatemala Quetzal
1 Philippine Peso = 3.96933 Guyana Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.15143 Hong Kong Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.45421 Honduras Lempira
1 Philippine Peso = 0.12329 Croatian Kuna
1 Philippine Peso = 1.19002 Haiti Gourde
1 Philippine Peso = 5.04988 Hungarian Forint
1 Philippine Peso = 262.46118 Indonesian Rupiah
1 Philippine Peso = 0.06762 Israeli Shekel
1 Philippine Peso = 1.26145 Indian Rupee
1 Philippine Peso = 22.63199 Iraqi Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 665.74146 Iran Rial
1 Philippine Peso = 2.03707 Iceland Krona
1 Philippine Peso = 2.46487 Jamaican Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01373 Jordanian Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 2.19732 Japanese Yen
1 Philippine Peso = 2.00019 Kenyan Shilling
1 Philippine Peso = 1.33191 Kyrgyzstan Som
1 Philippine Peso = 78.26087 Cambodia Riel
1 Philippine Peso = 8.11083 Comoros Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 17.46894 North Korean Won
1 Philippine Peso = 21.96991 Korean Won
1 Philippine Peso = 0.00585 Kuwaiti Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01592 Cayman Islands Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 6.49204 Kazakhstan Tenge
1 Philippine Peso = 160.69488 Lao Kip
1 Philippine Peso = 29.21972 Lebanese Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 2.98137 Sri Lanka Rupee
1 Philippine Peso = 2.29173 Liberian Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.26378 Lesotho Loti
1 Philippine Peso = 0.05918 Lithuanian Lita
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01204 Latvian Lat
1 Philippine Peso = 0.02652 Libyan Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.18258 Moroccan Dirham
1 Philippine Peso = 0.33463 Moldovan Leu
1 Philippine Peso = 1.00621 Macedonian Denar
1 Philippine Peso = 26.37811 Myanmar Kyat
1 Philippine Peso = 47.47671 Mongolian Tugrik
1 Philippine Peso = 0.15597 Macau Pataca
1 Philippine Peso = 6.84045 Mauritania Ougulya
1 Philippine Peso = 0.65703 Mauritius Rupee
1 Philippine Peso = 0.30221 Maldives Rufiyaa
1 Philippine Peso = 13.90062 Malawi Kwacha
1 Philippine Peso = 0.36633 Mexican Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 0.08199 Malaysian Ringgit
1 Philippine Peso = 0.26335 Namibian Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 6.8323 Nigerian Naira
1 Philippine Peso = 0.58773 Nicaragua Cordoba
1 Philippine Peso = 0.15441 Norwegian Krone
1 Philippine Peso = 2.0099 Nepalese Rupee
1 Philippine Peso = 0.02778 New Zealand Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.00746 Omani Rial
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01941 Panama Balboa
1 Philippine Peso = 0.06268 Peruvian Nuevo Sol
1 Philippine Peso = 0.06206 Papua New Guinea Kina
1 Philippine Peso = 1 Philippine Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 2.03901 Pakistani Rupee
1 Philippine Peso = 0.06957 Polish Zloty
1 Philippine Peso = 109.45264 Paraguayan Guarani
1 Philippine Peso = 0.07337 Qatar Rial
1 Philippine Peso = 0.0755 Romanian New Leu
1 Philippine Peso = 1.11374 Russian Rouble
1 Philippine Peso = 16.1349 Rwanda Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 0.07279 Saudi Arabian Riyal
1 Philippine Peso = 0.15088 Solomon Islands Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.26054 Seychelles Rupee
1 Philippine Peso = 0.12926 Sudanese Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 0.15816 Swedish Krona
1 Philippine Peso = 0.0264 Singapore Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01475 St Helena Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 0.43102 Slovak Koruna
1 Philippine Peso = 147.90373 Sierra Leone Leone
1 Philippine Peso = 10.81134 Somali Shilling
1 Philippine Peso = 402.56018 Sao Tome Dobra
1 Philippine Peso = 0.16984 El Salvador Colon
1 Philippine Peso = 9.99573 Syrian Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 0.26335 Swaziland Lilageni
1 Philippine Peso = 0.64344 Thai Baht
1 Philippine Peso = 0.04808 Tunisian Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.04338 Tongan paʻanga
1 Philippine Peso = 0.07108 Turkish Lira
1 Philippine Peso = 0.12963 Trinidad Tobago Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.58637 Taiwan Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 43.42003 Tanzanian Shilling
1 Philippine Peso = 0.51417 Ukraine Hryvnia
1 Philippine Peso = 70.78804 Ugandan Shilling
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01941 United States Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.5722 Uruguayan New Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 155.95885 Uzbekistan Sum
1 Philippine Peso = 0.1936 Venezuelan Bolivar
1 Philippine Peso = 440.93556 Vietnam Dong
1 Philippine Peso = 2.02426 Vanuatu Vatu
1 Philippine Peso = 0.04922 Samoa Tala
1 Philippine Peso = 10.76747 CFA Franc (BEAC)
1 Philippine Peso = 0.05241 East Caribbean Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 10.69488 CFA Franc (BCEAO)
1 Philippine Peso = 1.94759 Pacific Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 4.85151 Yemen Riyal
1 Philippine Peso = 0.26339 South African Rand
1 Philippine Peso = 100.72787 Zambian Kwacha
1 Philippine Peso = 7.02446 Zimbabwe dollar

The value of independent directorships

Recently a number of financial institutions had requested the Bangko Sentral ng Pilipinas (BSP) for permission to substantially increase the number of seats in their individual boards of directors (BOD). Logic dictates that a typical corporation with less seats and fewer directors has more control over its policy-making, and through various committees directors chair, exercise tighter control over management. For banks the minimum was five. This initiative taken by the banks is however a different matter. Banks and financial institutions are far from your typical cookie-cutter corporation.

The typical function of preserving assets or expanding these, reducing both current and long term liabilities to increase net worth and thus enhance shareholder values are set under a different light in a financial institution. One commonality would be in increasing shareholder values. Otherwise there are stark differences in asset and liability treatments -- differences that can be uncomfortable to non-banker independent directors.

For one, in a bank the most important assets are accounts receivables which represent the repayment of debts extended by the bank, perhaps the largest source of bank revenues. Depending on collectibility likelihoods these are aged and classified where the higher they are in the column, the closer they are to liquidity, the better the asset quality. The task then is to reduce receivables at the middle of the column, literally move these up and transform these into more liquid assets.

For another, the most critical current liabilities of a bank are the deposits entrusted to it from which banks fund loans. Thus banks aggressively increase deposit liabilities, embarking on deposit generation campaigns so that they will have the funds to lend. To the typical liability manager in a non-bank corporation the endeavor to increase liabilities would appear perverse. Not to a banker.

Consider these foregoing basic differences where independent directors populate bank boards beyond the minimums currently required.

The special request to expand board seats was in compliance with the regulatory initiatives of the BSP not simply to increase representation but also to specifically increase the number of requisite independent directorships and, effectively, to imbue non-aligned influence on bank policies and directions.

Off hand some obvious consequences immediately come to fore and compel us to look under the hood. The increase in the number of independent directors necessarily entail costs charged upon equity holders whose direct representation through their own nominees is effectively diluted thus weakening their direct influence in policies yet forcing them to take on the incremental costs of such dilution.

The upsides are however equally obvious but are logically dependent on the true degrees of independence brought into the board. In line with the global sweep of populism paradigms and initiatives in both the political and economic spheres, whether these impact on national agenda or the most mundane concerns of a domestic commercial bank, the introduction of independence alongside the dilution of traditionally concentrated influence and power among the few is expected to democratize monolithic institutions regardless of size. This is especially true in a bank for as long as the independence is real.

That the new head of the BSP comes from the ranks of the BSP’s bank supervisory department and has over the years under his watch been increasing the internal safeguards within financial institutions explains in part the initiative as integral to an endeavor to reduce internal risks in the banking system.

Risk reduction is critical in banking more than at any corporation. The liability side of a bank’s balance sheet shows why. Comprised of the deposits of numerous and anonymous lenders, these provide the financial wherewithal for a bank to lend. Thus depositor protection is critical. 

On the asset side, what comprises a bank’s asset girth are accounts receivables -- substantially money that has yet to be collected. The inherent weakness of such assets is obvious and thus its quality is dependent on credit policies established at the board level.

Equity capital backstops these liability and asset vulnerabilities and is mandated both by domestic and foreign regulators resulting in the capital adequacy ratio (CAR) as a critical bank measure. Because capital is provided by equity holders, directors who represent them tend to prioritize their interests. This highlights the importance of independent directors as counterfoils who provide checks and balances.

For this reason “fit and proper” rules are statutorily imposed on a bank’s directors. Likewise, are other limitations set for bank directors, officers, shareholders and related interests (DOSRI) relative to corporations in non-banking fields, specially where conflicts of interest may influence DOSRI to act against depositor’s, debtor’s and the public’s interests.

On a grander, more external scale, the banking sector is so linked within itself that bank failures have a tendency to turn epidemic. A scandal in one can create bank runs in others.

The need to diversify a bank’s board composition by requiring more independent directors is a move in the right direction. Unfortunately, experience has shown, these are typically recruited from friends and other insidiously aligned unofficial relationships -- a weakness that negates noble diversification objectives and, sadly, simply increases costs for naught.
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