July 21, 2017, 4:52 am
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1 Philippine Peso = 0.07443 UAE Dirham
1 Philippine Peso = 2.4017 Albanian Lek
1 Philippine Peso = 0.03628 Neth Antilles Guilder
1 Philippine Peso = 0.32436 Argentine Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 0.02723 Australian Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.03626 Aruba Florin
1 Philippine Peso = 0.04054 Barbados Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 1.63579 Bangladesh Taka
1 Philippine Peso = 0.03534 Bulgarian Lev
1 Philippine Peso = 0.00763 Bahraini Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 34.60377 Burundi Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 0.02027 Bermuda Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.02797 Brunei Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.13904 Bolivian Boliviano
1 Philippine Peso = 0.06579 Brazilian Real
1 Philippine Peso = 0.02027 Bahamian Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 1.30624 Bhutan Ngultrum
1 Philippine Peso = 0.20692 Botswana Pula
1 Philippine Peso = 405.75598 Belarus Ruble
1 Philippine Peso = 0.04049 Belize Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.02733 Canadian Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01952 Swiss Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 13.57175 Chilean Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 0.13799 Chinese Yuan
1 Philippine Peso = 58.59343 Colombian Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 11.43535 Costa Rica Colon
1 Philippine Peso = 0.02027 Cuban Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 1.98075 Cape Verde Escudo
1 Philippine Peso = 0.47231 Czech Koruna
1 Philippine Peso = 3.59951 Djibouti Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 0.13357 Danish Krone
1 Philippine Peso = 0.95278 Dominican Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 2.19181 Algerian Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.28109 Estonian Kroon
1 Philippine Peso = 0.36583 Egyptian Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 0.46433 Ethiopian Birr
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01797 Euro
1 Philippine Peso = 0.04244 Fiji Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01573 Falkland Islands Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01572 British Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 0.08685 Ghanaian Cedi
1 Philippine Peso = 0.91021 Gambian Dalasi
1 Philippine Peso = 182.75233 Guinea Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 0.1491 Guatemala Quetzal
1 Philippine Peso = 4.14512 Guyana Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.15784 Hong Kong Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.47422 Honduras Lempira
1 Philippine Peso = 0.13229 Croatian Kuna
1 Philippine Peso = 1.24625 Haiti Gourde
1 Philippine Peso = 5.54195 Hungarian Forint
1 Philippine Peso = 269.57844 Indonesian Rupiah
1 Philippine Peso = 0.07211 Israeli Shekel
1 Philippine Peso = 1.30521 Indian Rupee
1 Philippine Peso = 23.93595 Iraqi Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 657.62059 Iran Rial
1 Philippine Peso = 1.9771 Iceland Krona
1 Philippine Peso = 2.6139 Jamaican Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01433 Jordanian Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 2.23666 Japanese Yen
1 Philippine Peso = 2.0906 Kenyan Shilling
1 Philippine Peso = 1.38113 Kyrgyzstan Som
1 Philippine Peso = 81.57681 Cambodia Riel
1 Philippine Peso = 9.12404 Comoros Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 18.24078 North Korean Won
1 Philippine Peso = 22.6366 Korean Won
1 Philippine Peso = 0.00614 Kuwaiti Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01662 Cayman Islands Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 6.364 Kazakhstan Tenge
1 Philippine Peso = 166.08836 Lao Kip
1 Philippine Peso = 30.51277 Lebanese Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 3.08877 Sri Lanka Rupee
1 Philippine Peso = 1.84435 Liberian Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.25922 Lesotho Loti
1 Philippine Peso = 0.06179 Lithuanian Lita
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01258 Latvian Lat
1 Philippine Peso = 0.02821 Libyan Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.19642 Moroccan Dirham
1 Philippine Peso = 0.36735 Moldovan Leu
1 Philippine Peso = 1.09972 Macedonian Denar
1 Philippine Peso = 27.52331 Myanmar Kyat
1 Philippine Peso = 48.27726 Mongolian Tugrik
1 Philippine Peso = 0.16258 Macau Pataca
1 Philippine Peso = 7.25578 Mauritania Ougulya
1 Philippine Peso = 0.70024 Mauritius Rupee
1 Philippine Peso = 0.31394 Maldives Rufiyaa
1 Philippine Peso = 14.54094 Malawi Kwacha
1 Philippine Peso = 0.37863 Mexican Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 0.08672 Malaysian Ringgit
1 Philippine Peso = 0.2604 Namibian Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 6.52615 Nigerian Naira
1 Philippine Peso = 0.59972 Nicaragua Cordoba
1 Philippine Peso = 0.17055 Norwegian Krone
1 Philippine Peso = 2.08654 Nepalese Rupee
1 Philippine Peso = 0.02835 New Zealand Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.00779 Omani Rial
1 Philippine Peso = 0.02027 Panama Balboa
1 Philippine Peso = 0.06622 Peruvian Nuevo Sol
1 Philippine Peso = 0.06654 Papua New Guinea Kina
1 Philippine Peso = 1 Philippine Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 2.11897 Pakistani Rupee
1 Philippine Peso = 0.0753 Polish Zloty
1 Philippine Peso = 112.82935 Paraguayan Guarani
1 Philippine Peso = 0.0738 Qatar Rial
1 Philippine Peso = 0.08196 Romanian New Leu
1 Philippine Peso = 1.14766 Russian Rouble
1 Philippine Peso = 16.61897 Rwanda Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 0.076 Saudi Arabian Riyal
1 Philippine Peso = 0.16004 Solomon Islands Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.26836 Seychelles Rupee
1 Philippine Peso = 0.13498 Sudanese Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 0.17451 Swedish Krona
1 Philippine Peso = 0.02797 Singapore Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01573 St Helena Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 0.45006 Slovak Koruna
1 Philippine Peso = 152.00649 Sierra Leone Leone
1 Philippine Peso = 11.08634 Somali Shilling
1 Philippine Peso = 435.85326 Sao Tome Dobra
1 Philippine Peso = 0.17678 El Salvador Colon
1 Philippine Peso = 10.43737 Syrian Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 0.26014 Swaziland Lilageni
1 Philippine Peso = 0.6897 Thai Baht
1 Philippine Peso = 0.04917 Tunisian Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.04647 Tongan paʻanga
1 Philippine Peso = 0.0711 Turkish Lira
1 Philippine Peso = 0.13537 Trinidad Tobago Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.61011 Taiwan Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 45.17633 Tanzanian Shilling
1 Philippine Peso = 0.53223 Ukraine Hryvnia
1 Philippine Peso = 72.78071 Ugandan Shilling
1 Philippine Peso = 0.02027 United States Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.57377 Uruguayan New Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 77.82732 Uzbekistan Sum
1 Philippine Peso = 0.20216 Venezuelan Bolivar
1 Philippine Peso = 459.54601 Vietnam Dong
1 Philippine Peso = 2.18241 Vanuatu Vatu
1 Philippine Peso = 0.05201 Samoa Tala
1 Philippine Peso = 11.77483 CFA Franc (BEAC)
1 Philippine Peso = 0.05472 East Caribbean Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 11.82205 CFA Franc (BCEAO)
1 Philippine Peso = 2.13174 Pacific Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 5.06546 Yemen Riyal
1 Philippine Peso = 0.25921 South African Rand
1 Philippine Peso = 105.17835 Zambian Kwacha
1 Philippine Peso = 7.33482 Zimbabwe dollar

V for Bataan

VENIAL sin it is not. Mortal sin it is: grave and depriving the soul of divine grace. “The Bataan March is a conspicuous example.”

“When General King surrendered his forces on Bataan on 09 April 1942, he was assured by Japanese General Homma’s chief-of-staff that his soldiers would be treated humanely. General King had saved sufficient trucks from demolition to move his men from Bataan to the prisoner of war camp. The American and Filipino soldiers on Bataan had been on short rations and the sick and wounded were numerous. However, when General King suggested the use of the trucks, he was forbidden to do so. The prisoners were marched in intense heat along the highway to San Fernando, Pampanga, which is a distance of 120 kilometers, or 75 miles.”

“The sick and wounded were forced to march. Those who fell by the roadside and were unable to continue were shot or bayonetted. Others were taken from the ranks, beaten, tortured and killed. The march continued for nine days, with the Japanese guards being relieved at five kilometer intervals by fresh guards who had been transported in the American trucks. During the first five days, the prisoners received little or no food or water. Thereafter, the only water available was that from an occasional artesian well or caribou wallow. When the prisoners grouped around a well in an attempt to get water, the Japanese fired upon them.”

“Shooting and bayonetting of prisoners were commonplace. Dead bodies littered the side of the road. Murata, who had been sent to the Philippines in February 1942 by War Minister TOJO as a civilian advisor to General Homma, drove along this highway and saw the dead bodies along the highway in such great numbers that he was prompted to ask General Homma about the situation. Murata testified that, ‘I merely saw it; I did not complain about it; I just asked questions.’ At San Fernando, the prisoners were crowded into railway freight cars to be transported to Camp O’Donnell.” [International Military Tribunal for the Far East. Chapter VIII: Conventional War Crimes (Atrocities)]

Victors of peace. Jan Thompson, president of the American Defenders of Bataan and Corregidor Memorial Society, told a news conference in San Antonio, Texas last year that for many former prisoners of war, if Obama’s momentous visit to Hiroshima did not acknowledge the pain and suffering endured by all the victims, then his trip would only serve to further muddy the history of the war. [http://www.japantimes.co.jp/news/2016/05/22/national/politics-diplomacy/ex-pow-invited-accompany-obama-historic-hiroshima-visit/#.V0J3NSWXXw0]

Bakayaro! “The 1961 memoir, Tokyo saiban no shotai (The True Character of the Tokyo Trial) by Sugawara Yutaka, Araki Sadao’s lawyer, claimed that the Allies handed down seven death sentences to settle scores over seven wartime actions – Pearl Harbor, Singapore, Bataan and so on.” [Kirsten Sellars, “Imperfect Justice at Nuremberg and Tokyo,” The European Journal of International Law, Vol. 21, No. 4, 2011]

V is for valor. In their award-winning full-length documentary film (Manila 1945: The Rest of the Story), the producers (Peter Parsons and Lucky Guillermo) presented the surviving victims of the Battle for Manila who warned the postwar generations that if they forget those who lived on Bataan and Corregidor as well as in Manila and the rest of the Philippines, then those valiant men, women and children would have sacrificed uselessly. For example: Sgt. Jesus B. Delos Santos, 21st Division under the command of Col. Mateo B. Capinpin, was bayoneted and beaten on the 65-mile trek from Mariveles. His posthumous recognition as a World War II Hero was received in 2015 by his son, “who emulated his patriotism,” Lt. Gen. Jaime S. De Los Santos (Ret), former Commanding General of the Philippine Army.

Veneration without understanding? “On October 23, 1954, President Ramon D. Magsaysay, Sr. issued E.O. No. 77, which ordered ‘the remains of the war dead interred at the Bataan Memorial Cemetery, Bataan Province, and at other places in the Philippines, be transferred to, and reinterred at, the Republic Memorial Cemetery at Fort Wm Mckinley, Rizal Province’ so as to minimize the expenses for the maintenance and upkeep, and to make the remains accessible to the widows, parents, children, relatives, and friends.” [G.R. No. 225973]

Vade mecum. “Thanks to the nurses of Pearl Harbor, Bataan, and Corregidor, the profession has a place of honor in national esteem.” [Editorials, “A Three-point Program for ’43,” The American Journal of Nursing, Vol. 43, No. 1 (January 1943), pp. 1-3]

Vengeance. “There were two major reasons – Japan’s brutal conduct of the war and American desires to avoid the costly invasion – that largely explain Truman’s use of the atomic bomb. The first reason, Japan’s brutal conduct of the war, focuses on the rape of Nanjing, other massive atrocities against Asians, the ‘sneak’ attack on Pearl Harbor, the deadly Bataan death march, and other cruelties against Allied POWs.” [Barton J. Bernstein, “Truman and the A-Bomb: Targeting Noncombatants, Using the Bomb, and His Defending the ‘Decision’,” The Journal of Military History, Vol. 62, No. 3 (Jul., 1998), pp. 547-570]

Vagary. “MacArthur said, ‘If Bataan should fall, I’d consider joining the guerrillas myself’.” [Colonel Eugene C. Jacobs. Blood Brothers: A Medic’s Sketch Book. NY: Carlton Press, Inc., 1985, p. 21]

Vale of tears. “Officials in Washington knew about the Bataan Death March and other Japanese atrocities in the Philippines as early as mid 1943, but did not tell the public, or the families of the prisoners of war, until January 1944. Question: Should the government have withheld that information? Do the families of servicemen have an absolute right to know the fate and plight of their loved ones as soon as the government learns of it?” [Readers Guide to Norman’s Tears in the Darkness]

Valediction. “Percival’s preoccupation with pummeling the Japanese might also reveal an awareness on his part that the resistance of his army in the Malayan campaign and at Singapore was not the stirring stuff of the dour resistance of the Americans at Bataan and Corrigedor (sic)…” [Hamish Ion, “Brass Hats behind Bamboo Palisades: Senior Officer POWs in Singapore, Taiwan, and Manchukuo, 1942-45,” Canadian Journal of History, XLVI, Autumn 2011, pp. 303-331]

Back to the Peninsula. “We have captured BATAAN. The XI Corps landed elements of the 38th Division at MARIVELES on the morning of the 15th.” [G.H.Q. Southwest Pacific Area, Communique No. 1046, 17 February 1945]

Bataan 75th anniversary. Veterans of the USAFFE, defenders of Bataan and Corregidor, WW2 guerrillas of the Philippines, we salute you!
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