April 30, 2017, 1:19 pm
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1 Philippine Peso = 0.07338 UAE Dirham
1 Philippine Peso = 2.47153 Albanian Lek
1 Philippine Peso = 0.03551 Neth Antilles Guilder
1 Philippine Peso = 0.30767 Argentine Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 0.0267 Australian Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.03576 Aruba Florin
1 Philippine Peso = 0.03996 Barbados Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 1.62058 Bangladesh Taka
1 Philippine Peso = 0.03591 Bulgarian Lev
1 Philippine Peso = 0.00753 Bahraini Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 33.97123 Burundi Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01998 Bermuda Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.02787 Brunei Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.13766 Bolivian Boliviano
1 Philippine Peso = 0.06313 Brazilian Real
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01998 Bahamian Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 1.28122 Bhutan Ngultrum
1 Philippine Peso = 0.20824 Botswana Pula
1 Philippine Peso = 400.00001 Belarus Ruble
1 Philippine Peso = 0.03992 Belize Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.02724 Canadian Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01979 Swiss Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 13.24575 Chilean Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 0.13775 Chinese Yuan
1 Philippine Peso = 58.71728 Colombian Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 11.01139 Costa Rica Colon
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01998 Cuban Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 2.01439 Cape Verde Escudo
1 Philippine Peso = 0.49203 Czech Koruna
1 Philippine Peso = 3.51329 Djibouti Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 0.13587 Danish Krone
1 Philippine Peso = 0.94126 Dominican Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 2.18054 Algerian Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.28573 Estonian Kroon
1 Philippine Peso = 0.36064 Egyptian Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 0.45667 Ethiopian Birr
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01826 Euro
1 Philippine Peso = 0.04187 Fiji Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01546 Falkland Islands Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01544 British Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 0.08339 Ghanaian Cedi
1 Philippine Peso = 0.88012 Gambian Dalasi
1 Philippine Peso = 183.86813 Guinea Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 0.14668 Guatemala Quetzal
1 Philippine Peso = 4.08292 Guyana Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.1554 Hong Kong Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.46693 Honduras Lempira
1 Philippine Peso = 0.13577 Croatian Kuna
1 Philippine Peso = 1.35684 Haiti Gourde
1 Philippine Peso = 5.7015 Hungarian Forint
1 Philippine Peso = 266.45355 Indonesian Rupiah
1 Philippine Peso = 0.07222 Israeli Shekel
1 Philippine Peso = 1.28482 Indian Rupee
1 Philippine Peso = 23.5964 Iraqi Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 648.13188 Iran Rial
1 Philippine Peso = 2.12587 Iceland Krona
1 Philippine Peso = 2.56723 Jamaican Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01416 Jordanian Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 2.22689 Japanese Yen
1 Philippine Peso = 2.05694 Kenyan Shilling
1 Philippine Peso = 1.34302 Kyrgyzstan Som
1 Philippine Peso = 80.01199 Cambodia Riel
1 Philippine Peso = 9.22717 Comoros Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 17.98202 North Korean Won
1 Philippine Peso = 22.74046 Korean Won
1 Philippine Peso = 0.00607 Kuwaiti Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01638 Cayman Islands Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 6.28332 Kazakhstan Tenge
1 Philippine Peso = 163.51649 Lao Kip
1 Philippine Peso = 30.09391 Lebanese Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 3.03696 Sri Lanka Rupee
1 Philippine Peso = 1.81818 Liberian Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.26693 Lesotho Loti
1 Philippine Peso = 0.06091 Lithuanian Lita
1 Philippine Peso = 0.0124 Latvian Lat
1 Philippine Peso = 0.02813 Libyan Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.1977 Moroccan Dirham
1 Philippine Peso = 0.38132 Moldovan Leu
1 Philippine Peso = 1.11848 Macedonian Denar
1 Philippine Peso = 27.13287 Myanmar Kyat
1 Philippine Peso = 48.19181 Mongolian Tugrik
1 Philippine Peso = 0.16005 Macau Pataca
1 Philippine Peso = 7.13467 Mauritania Ougulya
1 Philippine Peso = 0.69331 Mauritius Rupee
1 Philippine Peso = 0.30689 Maldives Rufiyaa
1 Philippine Peso = 14.34486 Malawi Kwacha
1 Philippine Peso = 0.38017 Mexican Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 0.08672 Malaysian Ringgit
1 Philippine Peso = 0.26573 Namibian Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 6.28372 Nigerian Naira
1 Philippine Peso = 0.59521 Nicaragua Cordoba
1 Philippine Peso = 0.17029 Norwegian Krone
1 Philippine Peso = 2.03996 Nepalese Rupee
1 Philippine Peso = 0.02907 New Zealand Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.00769 Omani Rial
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01998 Panama Balboa
1 Philippine Peso = 0.06481 Peruvian Nuevo Sol
1 Philippine Peso = 0.06333 Papua New Guinea Kina
1 Philippine Peso = 1 Philippine Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 2.09251 Pakistani Rupee
1 Philippine Peso = 0.07709 Polish Zloty
1 Philippine Peso = 111.06893 Paraguayan Guarani
1 Philippine Peso = 0.07275 Qatar Rial
1 Philippine Peso = 0.08271 Romanian New Leu
1 Philippine Peso = 1.1388 Russian Rouble
1 Philippine Peso = 16.36144 Rwanda Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 0.07493 Saudi Arabian Riyal
1 Philippine Peso = 0.15666 Solomon Islands Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.27063 Seychelles Rupee
1 Philippine Peso = 0.13306 Sudanese Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 0.17603 Swedish Krona
1 Philippine Peso = 0.02788 Singapore Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01547 St Helena Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 0.44368 Slovak Koruna
1 Philippine Peso = 148.85115 Sierra Leone Leone
1 Philippine Peso = 10.96903 Somali Shilling
1 Philippine Peso = 447.57244 Sao Tome Dobra
1 Philippine Peso = 0.17427 El Salvador Colon
1 Philippine Peso = 10.28931 Syrian Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 0.26494 Swaziland Lilageni
1 Philippine Peso = 0.69131 Thai Baht
1 Philippine Peso = 0.04823 Tunisian Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.04623 Tongan paʻanga
1 Philippine Peso = 0.07099 Turkish Lira
1 Philippine Peso = 0.13406 Trinidad Tobago Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.60376 Taiwan Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 44.53547 Tanzanian Shilling
1 Philippine Peso = 0.52997 Ukraine Hryvnia
1 Philippine Peso = 72.76723 Ugandan Shilling
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01998 United States Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.56084 Uruguayan New Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 73.94606 Uzbekistan Sum
1 Philippine Peso = 0.19929 Venezuelan Bolivar
1 Philippine Peso = 454.32568 Vietnam Dong
1 Philippine Peso = 2.15265 Vanuatu Vatu
1 Philippine Peso = 0.05182 Samoa Tala
1 Philippine Peso = 11.97263 CFA Franc (BEAC)
1 Philippine Peso = 0.05395 East Caribbean Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 12 CFA Franc (BCEAO)
1 Philippine Peso = 2.17123 Pacific Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 4.99201 Yemen Riyal
1 Philippine Peso = 0.26515 South African Rand
1 Philippine Peso = 103.68632 Zambian Kwacha
1 Philippine Peso = 7.23077 Zimbabwe dollar

Two examples of allies behaving badly

SOCIAL media was abuzz over the weekend because of two stories involving President Rodrigo Duterte’s allies: actor turned-Tourism Promotions Board COO Cesar Montano and whistleblower Sandra Cam, who could be stars in their own episodes of “Allies Behaving Badly.”

These two are probably the best examples of why the bureaucracy is always on edge whenever there is a change in the administration or in department and agency leadership; as career bureaucrats, you simply close your eyes and pray that you get the luck of the draw when it comes to getting a good presidential appointee for a boss. If your luck holds, you’ll get a guy like former Foreign Affairs Secretary Albert del Rosario, who empowered the Foreign Service by recommending their placement in crucial posts and relying on their experience on diplomatic issues. To my recollection, Del Rosario largely depended on career diplomats and brought in very few confidential staff to assist him in his duties as secretary. On the other hand, if Mercury is in retrograde and your luck is a good as a duck’s in a Chinese restaurant, you might encounter these two stars. 

Despite Montano’s breakout role in the 1998 Jose Rizal biopic, in recent years he has gained more notoriety for his involvement in various scandals in show business, including his very public and nasty split from his estranged wife Sunshine Cruz. His political career has been unremarkable at best, with his celebrity status failing to clinch him a senate seat last 2007 and a gubernatorial bid in his home province of Bohol. 

Concerned employees of the TPB lodged a complaint against Montano with the Presidential Action Center, detailing a number of alleged offenses committed by him. Leading the litany of Montano’s supposed sins is the hiring of friends and family as TPB employees and consultants, including his gardener. (Perhaps the TPB office needs more greenery? Could be good for productivity.) While nepotism and the hiring of family members and friends may not raise eyebrows as high as it should during these times, allegations of Montano charging his and his entourage’s international and local travels (ostensibly official, hmmm) to government funds certainly raised an uproar. Further, Montano is accused of approving contracts worth millions of pesos favoring one or two production outfits to sponsor concerts and shows despite negative recommendations from his own Marketing Department. The complaint itself details more all-around bad behavior involving women, booze and beach getaways, giving the impression that Montano is possibly living out his favorite episode of HBO’s Entourage, albeit on government money.

More than the charges of highly improper behavior and questionable decisions, what is more laughable and alternatively depressing is the narration found in paragraph 17: “It can be observed that during meetings with the TPB Management Committee and Board Meetings, his level of retention and absorption is very low. He has difficulty understanding presentations, flow charts, and figures. Instead, he wants visuals.” So perhaps Tourism Secretary Wanda Teo was correct in expressing her polite disappointment at the announcement of Montano’s appointment, as she had recommended someone else for the post.

The action taken by PACE remains to be seen, but given the fact that PACE does not have any real authority over complaints of this nature beyond endorsing them to another office, I wouldn’t put money on its good prospects.

Another star in the continuing but infuriating saga of Allies Behaving Badly is jueteng bag lady-turned-whistleblower Sandra Cam. An official incident report filed with NAIA management narrates the encounter of a female MIAA employee assigned to the VIP Lounge, who asked Cam to produce identification and pay the 1,200 peso fee for the use of the lounge. Cam, apparently irked at the employee’s temerity to ask someone of her stature to produce something as inconsequential as identification (and gasp, pay the fee!) allegedly went on a verbal rampage against the hapless woman. At one point, Cam allegedly boasted about her impending appointment to the Duterte cabinet, supposedly saying: “You know, hija? I was on the phone. Do you know who I was talking to? I was talking to Bong Go. Do you know me? If you don’t, search me up on Google. I told you already I had no government ID because in three months I would be a member of the Cabinet.”

Despite her tirades, MIAA personnel still assisted her, all the while suffering her invectives and objections to their sub-par treatment of someone of her celebrity and status. Cam called the report a “big, big lie,” but admitted that she mentioned her expected appointment to MIAA staff. “What I said is, ‘You are not supposed to be in this job because you do not know how to handle people. You are so young but you are so rude,’” when she gave her side of the story. She also owned up to refusing to pay the fee, saying that she saw no reason to pay as she only stayed for a little while inside the lounge, and complained of lack of refreshments inside. The President said that the incident will have no effect on Cam’s position and that he would still give her work in government, adding that Cam helped him during the campaign. As to what that position is remains to be seen, as Duterte himself admitted that there is no vacancy in the Cabinet. 

Should both Montano and Cam be guilty of the allegations levied against them, then both are well on their way to winning the valedictorian and salutatorian award for Duterte’s Best and the Brightest, Class of 2017.

***

It’s Complicated
Issues facing government are not always about two sides. Abigail Valte’s law background and deep dive into government provides insight on its inner workings and what factors go into policy decision making. Her once a week column is an incision on current political and social issues.
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