July 18, 2018, 5:03 am
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1 Philippine Peso = 0.06864 UAE Dirham
1 Philippine Peso = 2.00897 Albanian Lek
1 Philippine Peso = 0.03439 Neth Antilles Guilder
1 Philippine Peso = 0.50824 Argentine Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 0.02516 Australian Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.03326 Aruba Florin
1 Philippine Peso = 0.03738 Barbados Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 1.56345 Bangladesh Taka
1 Philippine Peso = 0.03139 Bulgarian Lev
1 Philippine Peso = 0.00707 Bahraini Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 32.72248 Burundi Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01869 Bermuda Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.02526 Brunei Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.1282 Bolivian Boliviano
1 Philippine Peso = 0.07195 Brazilian Real
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01869 Bahamian Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 1.282 Bhutan Ngultrum
1 Philippine Peso = 0.19138 Botswana Pula
1 Philippine Peso = 374.13568 Belarus Ruble
1 Philippine Peso = 0.03734 Belize Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.02459 Canadian Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01871 Swiss Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 12.14969 Chilean Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 0.12502 Chinese Yuan
1 Philippine Peso = 53.37133 Colombian Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 10.54401 Costa Rica Colon
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01869 Cuban Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 1.76603 Cape Verde Escudo
1 Philippine Peso = 0.4139 Czech Koruna
1 Philippine Peso = 3.31714 Djibouti Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 0.11919 Danish Krone
1 Philippine Peso = 0.92375 Dominican Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 2.19884 Algerian Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.25015 Estonian Kroon
1 Philippine Peso = 0.3334 Egyptian Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 0.51037 Ethiopian Birr
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01599 Euro
1 Philippine Peso = 0.03902 Fiji Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01411 Falkland Islands Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01412 British Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 0.08949 Ghanaian Cedi
1 Philippine Peso = 0.88526 Gambian Dalasi
1 Philippine Peso = 168.36105 Guinea Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 0.13998 Guatemala Quetzal
1 Philippine Peso = 3.87012 Guyana Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.14665 Hong Kong Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.44715 Honduras Lempira
1 Philippine Peso = 0.11858 Croatian Kuna
1 Philippine Peso = 1.25939 Haiti Gourde
1 Philippine Peso = 5.1596 Hungarian Forint
1 Philippine Peso = 268.604 Indonesian Rupiah
1 Philippine Peso = 0.06791 Israeli Shekel
1 Philippine Peso = 1.27993 Indian Rupee
1 Philippine Peso = 22.12671 Iraqi Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 807.13885 Iran Rial
1 Philippine Peso = 2.0015 Iceland Krona
1 Philippine Peso = 2.42478 Jamaican Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01324 Jordanian Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 2.09923 Japanese Yen
1 Philippine Peso = 1.87722 Kenyan Shilling
1 Philippine Peso = 1.27646 Kyrgyzstan Som
1 Philippine Peso = 75.63072 Cambodia Riel
1 Philippine Peso = 7.88806 Comoros Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 16.81929 North Korean Won
1 Philippine Peso = 21.08952 Korean Won
1 Philippine Peso = 0.00566 Kuwaiti Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01532 Cayman Islands Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 6.39993 Kazakhstan Tenge
1 Philippine Peso = 157.01738 Lao Kip
1 Philippine Peso = 28.13493 Lebanese Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 2.97982 Sri Lanka Rupee
1 Philippine Peso = 2.97197 Liberian Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.24762 Lesotho Loti
1 Philippine Peso = 0.05697 Lithuanian Lita
1 Philippine Peso = 0.0116 Latvian Lat
1 Philippine Peso = 0.02562 Libyan Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.17688 Moroccan Dirham
1 Philippine Peso = 0.31088 Moldovan Leu
1 Philippine Peso = 0.98075 Macedonian Denar
1 Philippine Peso = 26.55578 Myanmar Kyat
1 Philippine Peso = 45.74846 Mongolian Tugrik
1 Philippine Peso = 0.15104 Macau Pataca
1 Philippine Peso = 6.63427 Mauritania Ougulya
1 Philippine Peso = 0.6382 Mauritius Rupee
1 Philippine Peso = 0.29097 Maldives Rufiyaa
1 Philippine Peso = 13.33283 Malawi Kwacha
1 Philippine Peso = 0.35287 Mexican Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 0.07569 Malaysian Ringgit
1 Philippine Peso = 0.24767 Namibian Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 6.69034 Nigerian Naira
1 Philippine Peso = 0.58456 Nicaragua Cordoba
1 Philippine Peso = 0.15155 Norwegian Krone
1 Philippine Peso = 2.04691 Nepalese Rupee
1 Philippine Peso = 0.02764 New Zealand Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.00719 Omani Rial
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01869 Panama Balboa
1 Philippine Peso = 0.06103 Peruvian Nuevo Sol
1 Philippine Peso = 0.06077 Papua New Guinea Kina
1 Philippine Peso = 1 Philippine Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 2.27135 Pakistani Rupee
1 Philippine Peso = 0.06898 Polish Zloty
1 Philippine Peso = 106.5969 Paraguayan Guarani
1 Philippine Peso = 0.06802 Qatar Rial
1 Philippine Peso = 0.07424 Romanian New Leu
1 Philippine Peso = 1.1686 Russian Rouble
1 Philippine Peso = 15.92992 Rwanda Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 0.07008 Saudi Arabian Riyal
1 Philippine Peso = 0.14699 Solomon Islands Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.25089 Seychelles Rupee
1 Philippine Peso = 0.33555 Sudanese Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 0.16567 Swedish Krona
1 Philippine Peso = 0.02551 Singapore Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01412 St Helena Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 0.41499 Slovak Koruna
1 Philippine Peso = 153.24238 Sierra Leone Leone
1 Philippine Peso = 10.65221 Somali Shilling
1 Philippine Peso = 391.8333 Sao Tome Dobra
1 Philippine Peso = 0.16352 El Salvador Colon
1 Philippine Peso = 9.624 Syrian Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 0.24803 Swaziland Lilageni
1 Philippine Peso = 0.62213 Thai Baht
1 Philippine Peso = 0.04953 Tunisian Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.04334 Tongan paʻanga
1 Philippine Peso = 0.09042 Turkish Lira
1 Philippine Peso = 0.12621 Trinidad Tobago Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.57118 Taiwan Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 42.3846 Tanzanian Shilling
1 Philippine Peso = 0.48981 Ukraine Hryvnia
1 Philippine Peso = 69.93085 Ugandan Shilling
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01869 United States Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.58568 Uruguayan New Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 145.44945 Uzbekistan Sum
1 Philippine Peso = 2236.96505 Venezuelan Bolivar
1 Philippine Peso = 430.74192 Vietnam Dong
1 Philippine Peso = 2.06036 Vanuatu Vatu
1 Philippine Peso = 0.04858 Samoa Tala
1 Philippine Peso = 10.48103 CFA Franc (BEAC)
1 Philippine Peso = 0.05046 East Caribbean Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 10.48103 CFA Franc (BCEAO)
1 Philippine Peso = 1.90563 Pacific Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 4.66922 Yemen Riyal
1 Philippine Peso = 0.24782 South African Rand
1 Philippine Peso = 96.98187 Zambian Kwacha
1 Philippine Peso = 6.76322 Zimbabwe dollar

Tide of impunity

IT’S good presidential spokesman Harry Roque is standing his ground against the Court of Appeals’ decision dismissing murder raps against former Palawan Governor Joel Reyes. 

He calls the shocking decision a mystery, and certainly not a miracle which the three CA justices have so joyfully declared to their hearts’ content. 

As far as we know, miracles are divine occurrences for physical and spiritual restoration while mysteries come from various sources in the dark and unlit dungeons of greed and depravity, no less. 

It was hardly an act of God for the Court of Appeals to preempt a lower regional court where the trial has not been completed. In this case, divine intervention belongs to the realm of fools and not to the oppressed. 

But Roque may yet find out that the level of impunity now enjoyed by many in the PNP accused of murdering thousands of drug users and pushers has infected the higher courts. 

And yet, it is not anything new when powerful politicians and wealthy businessmen are suddenly off the hook from a serious crime apparently thru a contrived “miracle” leading to fiscals and justices finding themselves tens of millions of pesos richer. 

Since President Duterte seems determined as ever to pursue a drug war with the same ferocity and impunity, judges and fiscals may have less fear from an enraged public that is remarkably vanishing. Because retribution has become a rare commodity for the lawless, Roque should expect this level of injustice to persist from a criminal justice system already broken to the core or down to the level of enforcement. The tide of impunity is today taking various crucial segments of this government by storm as ordained ironically by a populist President.

***

Jake Macasaet was a man who stood above the rest. His name will forever be part of the history of the heroic “mosquito press” during the Marcos dictatorship. I remember him fondly because my father and his siblings had looked up to him with respect and adulation. One day after my graduation at UP Diliman in the mid ‘70s, my father persuaded me to apply at the old Malaya newspaper and personally took me to the office of Mr. Macasaet at the Ortigas area. They knew each other as coffee buddies and would talk about the social-political struggles of the country that both believed the press should vigorously advance. It was a moment that somehow roused me from a dreaming but gallivanting college graduate armed with a selfish ambition backed up with proven but negligible credentials in radio broadcasting from the UP community radio.  

For some months, my father could not hide his disappointment when it became clear that I was not interested in doing a newspaper job and turning into a crusading journalist in the mold of Mr. Macasaet. I started as a DJ instead in a radio network and then at the Kanlaon Broadcasting System (KBS) and on to RPN or Channel 9 as a news reporter becoming news anchor and news and public affairs manager. For a time I relished the ambition that I had reached and my name that went with it. 

I would go over the Malaya newspapers in our office and come face-to-face with Mr. Macasaet through his stories and fearless patriotic commentaries. And somehow, I thought I was undone. No amount of threats of imprisonment and deaths threats had deterred Jake Macasaet in his life-long struggle to try to make his nation a better place to live in. It was also his message to someone like me who otherwise thought of serving his country well at a crony broadcast network. 

My sister, Dr. Luz Tamayo, a long-time consultant at the Makati Medical Center’s Ultra Sound Department, had the privilege of looking after Mr. Macasaet especially during the difficult times of his ailment. He was especially pleasant with her, who is by nature bubbly and very patient with her patients. They would share a lot of jokes. The last time I saw Mr. Macasaet at his office was some two years ago when he asked me if I could help in the marketing efforts of Business Insight Malaya. Jake Macasaet has become bigger than life and indeed only a few of us would have that honor.

***

A major and controversial issue relating to our faith would compel us to go to the Bible which should remain the foundation of our Christian faith. Or are we to live up to being the only Christian country in the Far East by depending on tradition and history to redefine our faith?

Through the years, broadcast media has portrayed the Black Nazarene procession out of proportion. Both devotees and viewers alike have been transfixed by the pageantry and fanaticism that has bestowed on the more than 20-hour long procession a gigantic news prominence.

Many have been lost in the meaning of reported healings which, as the Bible says, may not be the handiwork of Christ. 

Deuteronomy 5:8-9 says, “You shall not make for yourself an idol in the form of anything in the heaven above or on the earth beneath or in the waters below. You shall not bow down to them or worship them.” 

Kings 1 recorded the life and times of the kings of Israel and Judah to show that their success depended on the measure of their allegiance to God. Kings 2 traces the decline and captivity of both Israel and Judah after a succession of evil kings ordered and promoted idol worship.
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Column of the Day

Tearing down the house (Second of a series)

Jego Ragragio's picture
By Jego Ragragio | July 18,2018
‘The draft Federal Constitution is a clear example of tearing a house down in order to install a new door—where the new door goes into an existing door jamb. There’s barely anything new here, and the few things that are new, don’t actually need a constitutional amendment.’

Opinion of the Day

Heed this constitutional expert’s warning

Ellen Tordesillas's picture
By ELLEN TORDESILLAS | July 18, 2018
‘The critique of Gene Lacza Pilapil, assistant professor of Political Science at the University of the Philippines-Diliman, one of the resource persons, should warn us about the draft Federal Constitution produced by the Duterte-created Consultative Committee.’