October 20, 2017, 1:05 pm
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1 Philippine Peso = 0.07128 UAE Dirham
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1 Philippine Peso = 0.0346 Neth Antilles Guilder
1 Philippine Peso = 0.33849 Argentine Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 0.02474 Australian Dollar
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1 Philippine Peso = 0.06146 Brazilian Real
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1 Philippine Peso = 12.12442 Chilean Peso
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1 Philippine Peso = 0.01642 Euro
1 Philippine Peso = 0.03984 Fiji Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01474 Falkland Islands Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01481 British Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 0.08518 Ghanaian Cedi
1 Philippine Peso = 0.91421 Gambian Dalasi
1 Philippine Peso = 174.2236 Guinea Franc
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1 Philippine Peso = 3.96933 Guyana Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.15143 Hong Kong Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.45421 Honduras Lempira
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1 Philippine Peso = 1.19002 Haiti Gourde
1 Philippine Peso = 5.04988 Hungarian Forint
1 Philippine Peso = 262.46118 Indonesian Rupiah
1 Philippine Peso = 0.06762 Israeli Shekel
1 Philippine Peso = 1.26145 Indian Rupee
1 Philippine Peso = 22.63199 Iraqi Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 665.74146 Iran Rial
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1 Philippine Peso = 2.46487 Jamaican Dollar
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1 Philippine Peso = 2.19732 Japanese Yen
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1 Philippine Peso = 21.96991 Korean Won
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1 Philippine Peso = 6.49204 Kazakhstan Tenge
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1 Philippine Peso = 0.33463 Moldovan Leu
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1 Philippine Peso = 26.37811 Myanmar Kyat
1 Philippine Peso = 47.47671 Mongolian Tugrik
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1 Philippine Peso = 6.84045 Mauritania Ougulya
1 Philippine Peso = 0.65703 Mauritius Rupee
1 Philippine Peso = 0.30221 Maldives Rufiyaa
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1 Philippine Peso = 0.36633 Mexican Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 0.08199 Malaysian Ringgit
1 Philippine Peso = 0.26335 Namibian Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 6.8323 Nigerian Naira
1 Philippine Peso = 0.58773 Nicaragua Cordoba
1 Philippine Peso = 0.15441 Norwegian Krone
1 Philippine Peso = 2.0099 Nepalese Rupee
1 Philippine Peso = 0.02778 New Zealand Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.00746 Omani Rial
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01941 Panama Balboa
1 Philippine Peso = 0.06268 Peruvian Nuevo Sol
1 Philippine Peso = 0.06206 Papua New Guinea Kina
1 Philippine Peso = 1 Philippine Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 2.03901 Pakistani Rupee
1 Philippine Peso = 0.06957 Polish Zloty
1 Philippine Peso = 109.45264 Paraguayan Guarani
1 Philippine Peso = 0.07337 Qatar Rial
1 Philippine Peso = 0.0755 Romanian New Leu
1 Philippine Peso = 1.11374 Russian Rouble
1 Philippine Peso = 16.1349 Rwanda Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 0.07279 Saudi Arabian Riyal
1 Philippine Peso = 0.15088 Solomon Islands Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.26054 Seychelles Rupee
1 Philippine Peso = 0.12926 Sudanese Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 0.15816 Swedish Krona
1 Philippine Peso = 0.0264 Singapore Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01475 St Helena Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 0.43102 Slovak Koruna
1 Philippine Peso = 147.90373 Sierra Leone Leone
1 Philippine Peso = 10.81134 Somali Shilling
1 Philippine Peso = 402.56018 Sao Tome Dobra
1 Philippine Peso = 0.16984 El Salvador Colon
1 Philippine Peso = 9.99573 Syrian Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 0.26335 Swaziland Lilageni
1 Philippine Peso = 0.64344 Thai Baht
1 Philippine Peso = 0.04808 Tunisian Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.04338 Tongan paʻanga
1 Philippine Peso = 0.07108 Turkish Lira
1 Philippine Peso = 0.12963 Trinidad Tobago Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.58637 Taiwan Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 43.42003 Tanzanian Shilling
1 Philippine Peso = 0.51417 Ukraine Hryvnia
1 Philippine Peso = 70.78804 Ugandan Shilling
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01941 United States Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.5722 Uruguayan New Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 155.95885 Uzbekistan Sum
1 Philippine Peso = 0.1936 Venezuelan Bolivar
1 Philippine Peso = 440.93556 Vietnam Dong
1 Philippine Peso = 2.02426 Vanuatu Vatu
1 Philippine Peso = 0.04922 Samoa Tala
1 Philippine Peso = 10.76747 CFA Franc (BEAC)
1 Philippine Peso = 0.05241 East Caribbean Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 10.69488 CFA Franc (BCEAO)
1 Philippine Peso = 1.94759 Pacific Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 4.85151 Yemen Riyal
1 Philippine Peso = 0.26339 South African Rand
1 Philippine Peso = 100.72787 Zambian Kwacha
1 Philippine Peso = 7.02446 Zimbabwe dollar

Shepherds with the smell of their sheep

JESUS said: “Amen, amen, I say to you, whoever does not enter a sheepfold through the gate but climbs over elsewhere is a thief and a robber. But whoever enters through the gate is the shepherd of the sheep.

The gatekeeper opens it for him, and the sheep hear his voice, as the shepherd calls his own sheep by name and leads them out. When he has driven out all his own, he walks ahead of them, and the sheep follow him, because they recognize his voice. But they will not follow a stranger; they will run away from him, because they do not recognize the voice of strangers.” Although Jesus used this figure of speech, the Pharisees did not realize what he was trying to tell them.

So Jesus said again, “Amen, amen, I say to you, I am the gate for the sheep. All who came before me are thieves and robbers, but the sheep did not listen to them. I am the gate. Whoever enters through me will be saved, and will come in and go out and find pasture. A thief comes only to steal and slaughter and destroy, I came so that they might have life and have it more abundantly.”

***

There are many passages in the Old Testament that repeatedly speaks of God as the shepherd of his people. Psalm 23, from where our Responsorial Psalm is taken, is just one of those passages and perhaps the one we are most familiar with. Similarly, many perfidious and deceitful leaders of Israel are presented, particularly in the prophetic tradition, as corrupt and depraved shepherds of the people entrusted to their care. When Jesus, therefore, speaks about the “shepherd theme,” he is not venturing into an unfamiliar field. In the Gospel reading for this Sunday, Jesus uses two images that are related to the “shepherd theme.” First, he describes a shepherd as someone who knows and accompanies his sheep. He is contrasted with the stranger whom the sheep will not follow but instead run away from because they do not recognize his voice. Second, Jesus portrays himself as the gate of the sheepfold in whom the sheep will find salvation, protection, and pasture. He is contrasted with the thieves and robbers who come “only to steal and slaughter and destroy.”

The Good Shepherd—the Lord knows and accompanies us.

Sheep may provide food to eat, milk to drink, and wool for clothing. They may also be used as medium of exchange for trade and as animals for sacrifice. But they can hardly be considered among the smartest among the animals. They do not have the speed of a gazelle, the menacing appearance of a bear, the aggressiveness of a crocodile, or the ferocity of a lion. Sheep have good peripheral vision but poor depth perception. Because of this, depressions or dips on the ground may cause a sheep to hesitate and pull back, appearing to be lost and not knowing how to move forward. Thus, to be sheepish means to look or to act shamefaced, embarrassed, docile, meek, and lacking in confidence. Indeed, sheep need a shepherd who, as described in our Gospel reading, knows and calls them by name, and who leads them out of the sheepfold and walks ahead of them. A good shepherd is able to do these functions because he accompanies and stays with the sheep all the time. He is their constant companion and, as such, it becomes inevitable that he smells like them. That is precisely what Pope Francis exhorted his priests to be. In his first Chrism Mass as Supreme Pontiff, he remarked: “This I ask you: be shepherds with the smell of sheep.”

When you find yourself in a big crowd of strangers, you feel so anonymous. You feel like a sheep who is lost in the midst of this vast multitude of humanity. When you pray and feel that what you asked for has not been answered, doubts may arise and you begin to question whether God knows and listens to what you are praying for, whether he really has time for you, whether he cares for you. The Gospel reading reassures us that nobody is anonymous before the Lord. No one is lost in a crowd. Jesus himself points out that “the shepherd calls his own sheep by name.” Yes, he knows each of us. He knows us by name. But he not only knows us, he cares for us. The good shepherd truly cares for the sheep, their welfare, their well-being, what is good for them.

The Door—the Lord is the way to eternal life.

Twice in the second part of the Gospel, Jesus refers to himself as the gate of the sheepfold that functions as shelter and a safe haven for the sheep, particularly at night. On a hillside or hinterland sheepfold, the enclosure would not have any gate and the shepherd would usually lie down and sleep across the entrance. Literally, the shepherd becomes the gate of the sheepfold so that no sheep could get in or out of the enclosure without passing through him. At sundown, the sheep come in through the gate for protection and security and, at daybreak, they go out in order to find green pasture for their nourishment. The image of Jesus as the gate highlights the role of Jesus as the savior (“Whoever enters through me will be saved”) and evokes the twin notions of security and providence (“come in and go out”).

It is not infrequent today for people to pin their hopes on a particular person or leader, or to think that their sustenance depends solely on what they have accumulated and saved, or to assume that their security is to be attained in their influence and power. The Gospel reading is a timely reminder that it is Jesus who alone is our true Savior, and our veritable security and sufficiency. In him, we find our life’s refuge and satisfaction. St. Augustine said it well when he wrote: ”You have made us for yourself, O Lord, and our heart is restless until it rests in you.”

***

– Fr. Victor S. Nicdao
– (May 7, 2017)
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