June 23, 2018, 9:30 pm
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1 Philippine Peso = 0.06901 UAE Dirham
1 Philippine Peso = 2.02912 Albanian Lek
1 Philippine Peso = 0.03401 Neth Antilles Guilder
1 Philippine Peso = 0.5072 Argentine Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 0.02524 Australian Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.03345 Aruba Florin
1 Philippine Peso = 0.03758 Barbados Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 1.57159 Bangladesh Taka
1 Philippine Peso = 0.03155 Bulgarian Lev
1 Philippine Peso = 0.00712 Bahraini Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 32.90079 Burundi Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01879 Bermuda Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.02526 Brunei Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.1289 Bolivian Boliviano
1 Philippine Peso = 0.07111 Brazilian Real
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01879 Bahamian Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 1.28053 Bhutan Ngultrum
1 Philippine Peso = 0.19402 Botswana Pula
1 Philippine Peso = 376.17437 Belarus Ruble
1 Philippine Peso = 0.03754 Belize Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.02493 Canadian Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01856 Swiss Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 11.99061 Chilean Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 0.12218 Chinese Yuan
1 Philippine Peso = 54.75385 Colombian Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 10.57591 Costa Rica Colon
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01879 Cuban Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 1.77772 Cape Verde Escudo
1 Philippine Peso = 0.41526 Czech Koruna
1 Philippine Peso = 3.33615 Djibouti Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 0.12016 Danish Krone
1 Philippine Peso = 0.92728 Dominican Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 2.1963 Algerian Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.25225 Estonian Kroon
1 Philippine Peso = 0.33484 Egyptian Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 0.51146 Ethiopian Birr
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01612 Euro
1 Philippine Peso = 0.03918 Fiji Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01416 Falkland Islands Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01417 British Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 0.08979 Ghanaian Cedi
1 Philippine Peso = 0.87956 Gambian Dalasi
1 Philippine Peso = 169.07178 Guinea Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 0.14072 Guatemala Quetzal
1 Philippine Peso = 3.87599 Guyana Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.14741 Hong Kong Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.44878 Honduras Lempira
1 Philippine Peso = 0.11882 Croatian Kuna
1 Philippine Peso = 1.24803 Haiti Gourde
1 Philippine Peso = 5.23224 Hungarian Forint
1 Philippine Peso = 264.43067 Indonesian Rupiah
1 Philippine Peso = 0.06764 Israeli Shekel
1 Philippine Peso = 1.27568 Indian Rupee
1 Philippine Peso = 22.24728 Iraqi Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 798.38407 Iran Rial
1 Philippine Peso = 2.03119 Iceland Krona
1 Philippine Peso = 2.45509 Jamaican Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01333 Jordanian Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 2.06417 Japanese Yen
1 Philippine Peso = 1.89121 Kenyan Shilling
1 Philippine Peso = 1.28183 Kyrgyzstan Som
1 Philippine Peso = 76.00526 Cambodia Riel
1 Philippine Peso = 7.92522 Comoros Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 16.91094 North Korean Won
1 Philippine Peso = 20.86622 Korean Won
1 Philippine Peso = 0.00568 Kuwaiti Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01541 Cayman Islands Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 6.38595 Kazakhstan Tenge
1 Philippine Peso = 158.00451 Lao Kip
1 Philippine Peso = 28.292 Lebanese Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 2.98572 Sri Lanka Rupee
1 Philippine Peso = 2.74709 Liberian Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.25254 Lesotho Loti
1 Philippine Peso = 0.05728 Lithuanian Lita
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01166 Latvian Lat
1 Philippine Peso = 0.02548 Libyan Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.1786 Moroccan Dirham
1 Philippine Peso = 0.3177 Moldovan Leu
1 Philippine Peso = 0.98891 Macedonian Denar
1 Philippine Peso = 25.98647 Myanmar Kyat
1 Philippine Peso = 45.97896 Mongolian Tugrik
1 Philippine Peso = 0.15183 Macau Pataca
1 Philippine Peso = 6.67042 Mauritania Ougulya
1 Philippine Peso = 0.65295 Mauritius Rupee
1 Philippine Peso = 0.29256 Maldives Rufiyaa
1 Philippine Peso = 13.4053 Malawi Kwacha
1 Philippine Peso = 0.37584 Mexican Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 0.07518 Malaysian Ringgit
1 Philippine Peso = 0.25239 Namibian Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 6.72679 Nigerian Naira
1 Philippine Peso = 0.59207 Nicaragua Cordoba
1 Philippine Peso = 0.15205 Norwegian Krone
1 Philippine Peso = 2.03401 Nepalese Rupee
1 Philippine Peso = 0.02719 New Zealand Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.00723 Omani Rial
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01879 Panama Balboa
1 Philippine Peso = 0.06134 Peruvian Nuevo Sol
1 Philippine Peso = 0.0609 Papua New Guinea Kina
1 Philippine Peso = 1 Philippine Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 2.28222 Pakistani Rupee
1 Philippine Peso = 0.06966 Polish Zloty
1 Philippine Peso = 106.55769 Paraguayan Guarani
1 Philippine Peso = 0.06839 Qatar Rial
1 Philippine Peso = 0.07509 Romanian New Leu
1 Philippine Peso = 1.18236 Russian Rouble
1 Philippine Peso = 15.96073 Rwanda Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 0.07046 Saudi Arabian Riyal
1 Philippine Peso = 0.1479 Solomon Islands Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.25235 Seychelles Rupee
1 Philippine Peso = 0.33738 Sudanese Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 0.16635 Swedish Krona
1 Philippine Peso = 0.02551 Singapore Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01417 St Helena Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 0.41725 Slovak Koruna
1 Philippine Peso = 149.94363 Sierra Leone Leone
1 Philippine Peso = 10.72905 Somali Shilling
1 Philippine Peso = 394.98309 Sao Tome Dobra
1 Philippine Peso = 0.16441 El Salvador Colon
1 Philippine Peso = 9.67644 Syrian Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 0.25202 Swaziland Lilageni
1 Philippine Peso = 0.61856 Thai Baht
1 Philippine Peso = 0.04882 Tunisian Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.04333 Tongan paʻanga
1 Philippine Peso = 0.08786 Turkish Lira
1 Philippine Peso = 0.12682 Trinidad Tobago Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.56924 Taiwan Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 42.63435 Tanzanian Shilling
1 Philippine Peso = 0.49267 Ukraine Hryvnia
1 Philippine Peso = 72.51597 Ugandan Shilling
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01879 United States Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.59451 Uruguayan New Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 147.50094 Uzbekistan Sum
1 Philippine Peso = 1499.4363 Venezuelan Bolivar
1 Philippine Peso = 430.10147 Vietnam Dong
1 Philippine Peso = 2.07159 Vanuatu Vatu
1 Philippine Peso = 0.0488 Samoa Tala
1 Philippine Peso = 10.56614 CFA Franc (BEAC)
1 Philippine Peso = 0.05073 East Caribbean Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 10.56614 CFA Franc (BCEAO)
1 Philippine Peso = 1.92165 Pacific Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 4.69466 Yemen Riyal
1 Philippine Peso = 0.25241 South African Rand
1 Philippine Peso = 97.51033 Zambian Kwacha
1 Philippine Peso = 6.80008 Zimbabwe dollar

Security treaty with China

SENATOR Aquilino Pimentel III has suggested that a formal security treaty with China be entered into following President Xi Jinping’s assurance given to President Rodrigo Roa Duterte aka Digong that Beijing would protect the country from external threats. I made a similar proposition in this space before – a non-aggression pact. Pimentel’s suggestion came in the wake of reports that China has installed missiles and deployed bomber aircraft on reefs in the Spratlys reclaimed and developed by her as military outposts. The reefs are located within our Exclusive Economic Zone over which we have sovereign rights. “Our relationship with the US is formalized in a series of treaties and we are not barred to have a treaty with China. So if the two leaders have expressed sentiments in that tenor, then maybe our foreign affairs department, our respective departments should pursue formalizing such an agreement,” Pimentel said. I fully agree. I sincerely believe it is a great idea, although it will most likely not sit well with the US and her Western lackeys. For one thing, such a treaty would be proof positive that China is a true friend and not a threat to the Philippines as some countries, particularly Western, and the Yellowtards in our midst would have us believe otherwise. Secondly, such a treaty would no longer necessitate or justify the retention of the Enhanced Defense Cooperation Agreement (EDCA) and the Visiting Forces Agreement (VFA) with the US, both of which are of questionable constitutionality. The agreements are, without a doubt, a denigration of our sovereignty. The move would also be consistent with Digong’s expressed desire to rid the country of foreign troops. The 1951 Mutual Defense Treaty with the US could remain, notwithstanding its lack of an instant retaliation clause against any country that may attack the Philippines. In my humble opinion, therefore, the government should take immediate steps towards this end, i.e., forge a security accord with China. The sooner it is done, the better for the country. I cannot think of a more opportune time to cut the umbilical cord that has kept us utterly dependent on the US for so long. If China balks, Digong may have to re-think and re-assess his foreign policy thrust. HIGH-LEVEL DELEGATION TO HAWAII A high-level delegation of Philippine officials, and I mean high level, attended a meeting in Hawaii on May 17-21. The delegation was composed of Executive Secretary Salvador Medialdea, Foreign Secretary Alan Cayetano, Defense Secretary Delfin Lorenzana and Department of Interior and local Government officer-in-charge (de facto secretary) Eduardo Ano. You can’t have a higher level delegation than that, i.e., below one that is headed by the President or the Vice President. Breaking all rules of protocol, the delegation met with the head of the US Pacific Command (PACOM) Admiral Harry Harris. This was confirmed by the Defense Department spokesman Arsenio Andolong, according to the Philippine News Agency (PNA). PACOM is “the oldest and largest unified combatant command of the United States Armed Forces and is responsible for military operations in the Indo-Asia-Pacific region”. “The agenda is not privy to us. Mahirap mag-speculate kasi wala namang sinabi, but silang apat ang magkakasama (It is difficult to speculate because nothing was mentioned. But the four of them will be together),” Andolong said. Now, that’s interesting. Could it be they discussed the situation in the South China Sea? Or the independent foreign policy posture of Digong? Or the immediate implementation of the Enhanced Defense Cooperation Agreement (EDCA) as a couple of so-called experts suggest? Or all of the above? Question is, does Harris have the status of a policy maker in Washington’s power structure? I doubt it. He must have had his instructions in discussing whatever was discussed in Hawaii. The impression I get is that the top officials of Digong’s cabinet appear to have been “summoned” to meet with Harris! And they complied! The least they could have done was to insist on meeting with their counterparts! Or, if that is not possible, for Harris to meet with his counterpart. I cannot imagine China and Russia treating us with such condescension can you? BUT what bothers me really is that the delegation must have been given the go signal by Digong! Nothing could possibly be more inconsistent with his avowed aim to end our vassalage to the US! Is it any wonder then the US treats us like “a dog with a leash”?! US AID TO PH MUCH LESS THAN TO NON-ALLIES The Stimson Center, a Washington-based non-partisan policy research center, has released data that show the US has spent less on the Philippines, a long-standing ally, in terms of foreign assistance than on other countries. According to the Stimson Center’s study, US total counterterrorism assistance to the Philippines in the last fifteen years, repeat, 15 years, amounted to less than her assistance to Afghanistan in 2017 alone. Interestingly, Stimson Center revealed that the US spent more on other countries that are not her allies including Syria, Indonesia, Kenya, Bangladesh, Somalia and Nigeria. That’s how the US has been taking us for granted all these years, decades! Makes you weep, doesn’t it? *** REMINDERS This segment is intended to remind the Duterte administration of some of its yet unfulfilled promises and matters that need attention and/or follow-up action. More importantly, the people are entitled to know what’s being done about them. 1) Digong’s promise to rid the country of foreign troops. This, of course, necessitates re-visiting the lopsided VFA and the EDCA with the US. 2) Reciprocal visa arrangements with the US and other countries. (What is the DFA doing about this? Our embassy in Washington?) 3) The retrieval of the Balangiga bells. (Sources say the return of the bells is under negotiation. Is our embassy in Washington on top of this?) 4) The return of the Canadian waste. (Sources say the DOJ has filed a motion before the proper court for the importer to return the waste to Canada. No decision yet. No word about what Canada is doing.) *** Today is the 24th day of the twelfth year of the enforced disappearance of Jonas Burgos, son of the late press icon and founder of this newspaper, Joe Burgos. After the acquittal of Major Harry Baliaga, Jr., the only person formally charged with Jonas’ kidnapping, I guess what happens next is now up to Divine Providence. *** From an internet friend: A woman and her son were taking a cab in New York City. It was raining and all the hookers were standing under the awnings. “Mommy,” said the little boy, “what are all those ladies doing?” “They’re waiting for their husbands to get off work,” she replied. The cabbie turns around and says, “Geez lady, why don’t you tell him the truth? They’re hookers. They have sex with men for money.” The little boy’s eyes get wide and he says, “Is that true, mommy?” His mother, glaring at the cabbie, answers in the affirmative. After a few minutes, the kid asks, “Mommy what happens to the babies those ladies have?” “They mostly become cab drivers,” she replied. *** 21 May 2018 FB: https://www.facebook.com/reynaldo.arcilla.9847
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Unbridled brazenness

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