November 24, 2017, 5:17 pm
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SC Resolution favors Bongbong

MGA Manananggol Laban. Laban kanino? A newly formed group to end EJK. Some are anxious to get Laban’s laconic, untroubled definition of EJK; which ever extra judicial killings Laban has its sights on; and the names of those EJK’s victims and killers. 

Law freshman Horatio Castillo III, dead after his UST Aegis Juris fraternity brods were done hazing him. Since Atio is a victim of extra judicial killing--killed without the sanction of judges and courts--shouldn’t Mga Manananggol Laban jump in and work to find the extra judicial killers of Atio? 

Antonio La Viña who’s been on media microphones lately, Edre Olalia, Erin Tanada, Marita Wasan, Armin Luistro, Rene Saguisag, Pacifico Agabin, Neri Colmenares, Jose Manuel Diokno, Ernesto Maceda Jr, June Ambrosio, Roberto Cadiz, Rachel Pastores and the rest of the Laban group--have any of them done anything to bring justice to this extra judicial killing of Horatio Castillo III? We are waiting for you to let us know what all, if any, you have done to help ferret the elusive killers of Atio Castillo. 

Laban can also help the authorities with unsolved non-drug EJK--dead for any of the following reasons: 1) enemies, 2) love triangles, i 3) drug competitors, 4) intrigues, 5) inheritance, 6) scorned, 7) addict’s unpaid debts, 8) jealousy, 9) envy, 10) drunk, 11) infidelity, 12) joy killing, 13) creditors/debtors, 14) politics, 15) burglary, 16) parricide, 17) resisting arrests, 18) drug-addled, 19) business competitor, 20) do-good vigilantes.
President Duterte’s spokesman, Harry Roque, the human rights lawyer, denied that there had been human rights violations on the part of the President. But Roque welcomes Mga Manananggol Laban. Sa ano? 

Roque: “Unless we can come up with actual evidence that there are extra-legal killings, then we cannot overcome the presumption of regularity in the discharge of official functions.... [President Duterte] he will not tolerate murders. He will only tolerate killings when it is in line with duty and when the engagement is legal.”

Roque said in any war it is expected that... “Unfortunately, there will be collateral damage.... The goal of the government is to minimize the collateral damage. The goal of the government is to uphold the right to life which is to protect and promote the right to life. As far as this obligation is concerned, there is a continuing obligation of the state to investigate, prosecute and punish the perpetrators of these killings.... I welcome the creation of that group of lawyers because we need the help of civil society in overcoming the presumption of regularity in the discharge of functions.”

Supt. Vemily Madrid, PNP deputy spokesman: “Let me make it clear, there is no such order to kill drug suspects. So, how much more giving cash rewards to those police officers who were able to kill drug suspects.”

Lingayen-Dagupan auxiliary bishop Jose Elmer Mangalinao tells us that the “Stop the Killing Appeal” is led by Archbishop Socrates Villegas, outgoing president of CBCP. It includes the ringing of church bells for 15 minutes each 8 p.m, rural bedtime. It was done to remind the faithful that life is sacred and no one has the right to take life away or kill.... Mangalinao is repeating what is common knowledge, but not the solution. The problem still with no solution is that the authorities have no idea who the EJK murderers are. There are many dead. But missing are the killers: 1) enemy? 2) love triangle, 3) drug competitors, 4) intrigues, 5) inheritance, 6) scorned, 7) addict’s unpaid debts, 8) jealousy, 9) envy, 10) drunk, 11) infidelity, 12) joy killing, 13) creditors/debtors, 14) politics, 15) burglary, 16) parricide, 17) resisting arrests, 18) drug-addled, 19) business competitor, 20) do-good vigilantes. Do Mangalinao and Villegas have an idea where to find these killers? 

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The camp of former Senator Ferdinand “Bongbong” R. Marcos Jr. expressed tribute to a resolution of Supreme Court, sitting as the Presidential Electoral Tribunal (PET). 

The Comelec had asked the PET to order Marcos to pay Php 4.5 million for New York and Hong Kong storage fees. The PET rejected Comelec’s motion, saying it had no basis and that they should shoulder the storage and other incidental fees. 

It was Comelec who chose not to return the ballot boxes and other election materials to the Comelec headquarters in Manila. There was no objection from either PET or Marcos to return those to the Comelec headquarters in Manila. Comelec could have done so by securing the PET’s permission.

Precautionary Protective Order (PPO) directs Comelec to preserve and safeguard the integrity of the ballots and other election materials. But Comelec failed to bring ballots and materials back to the Comelec office in Manila within the required period. The ballots and materials therefore had to be stocked in the foreign posts which resulted in P4.5 million fee for New York and Hongkong.

“... Indeed, the Comelec could have simply secured permission from the Tribunal for their transfer to the Comelec Central Office. The Comelec made no such request... (a)s mentioned, the PPO is clear in that the Comelec and its agents were ordered to preserve and safeguard the integrity of the election materials and paraphernalia which could be done, even if they needed to be transmitted to Comelec Central Office.”--Statement from the Precautionary Protective Order.

PET: “Protestant never requested that the election materials and paraphernalia be physically retained in the custody of the Posts. Rather, it was the Comelec that made the decision not to instruct the Posts to transmit the election materials and paraphernalia to the Comelec Central Office, despite the absence of any prohibition for the same. Had the Comelec made such instruction, the Subject Expenses would not have been incurred. Accordingly, the Comelec must bear the responsibility of paying for the Subject Expenses incurred by the Posts.”

Lawyer Victor Rodriguez, spokesman of Marcos, praised the PET for the ruling, saying that it was a positive development in the midst of unabashed moves to derail the proceedings, by making it more cumbersome for Marcos. “This is certainly a very positive development for Senator Marcos. As you can see, our opponents are making things more difficult for us by trying to delay the case; making us pay left and right without any basis. We are glad that the PET denied these unfounded and unnecessary moves, so our case can finally move forward.”

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Dahliaspillera@yahoo.com
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