November 20, 2017, 3:44 am
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1 Philippine Peso = 0.07227 UAE Dirham
1 Philippine Peso = 2.22452 Albanian Lek
1 Philippine Peso = 0.03503 Neth Antilles Guilder
1 Philippine Peso = 0.34355 Argentine Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 0.02607 Australian Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.03503 Aruba Florin
1 Philippine Peso = 0.03935 Barbados Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 1.64187 Bangladesh Taka
1 Philippine Peso = 0.0327 Bulgarian Lev
1 Philippine Peso = 0.00742 Bahraini Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 34.29713 Burundi Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01968 Bermuda Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.02667 Brunei Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.13499 Bolivian Boliviano
1 Philippine Peso = 0.0645 Brazilian Real
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01968 Bahamian Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 1.28247 Bhutan Ngultrum
1 Philippine Peso = 0.20681 Botswana Pula
1 Philippine Peso = 393.93939 Belarus Ruble
1 Philippine Peso = 0.03931 Belize Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.02511 Canadian Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01951 Swiss Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 12.40988 Chilean Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 0.13051 Chinese Yuan
1 Philippine Peso = 59.13813 Colombian Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 11.08422 Costa Rica Colon
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01968 Cuban Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 1.83943 Cape Verde Escudo
1 Philippine Peso = 0.42677 Czech Koruna
1 Philippine Peso = 3.47954 Djibouti Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 0.12411 Danish Krone
1 Philippine Peso = 0.94451 Dominican Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 2.25075 Algerian Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.2609 Estonian Kroon
1 Philippine Peso = 0.34652 Egyptian Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 0.53227 Ethiopian Birr
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01667 Euro
1 Philippine Peso = 0.04117 Fiji Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.0149 Falkland Islands Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01491 British Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 0.0895 Ghanaian Cedi
1 Philippine Peso = 0.92483 Gambian Dalasi
1 Philippine Peso = 177.2137 Guinea Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 0.14447 Guatemala Quetzal
1 Philippine Peso = 4.05313 Guyana Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.15372 Hong Kong Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.46232 Honduras Lempira
1 Philippine Peso = 0.12613 Croatian Kuna
1 Philippine Peso = 1.21291 Haiti Gourde
1 Philippine Peso = 5.19481 Hungarian Forint
1 Philippine Peso = 266.09603 Indonesian Rupiah
1 Philippine Peso = 0.06915 Israeli Shekel
1 Philippine Peso = 1.27847 Indian Rupee
1 Philippine Peso = 22.9634 Iraqi Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 693.36875 Iran Rial
1 Philippine Peso = 2.02755 Iceland Krona
1 Philippine Peso = 2.47068 Jamaican Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01392 Jordanian Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 2.21558 Japanese Yen
1 Philippine Peso = 2.03994 Kenyan Shilling
1 Philippine Peso = 1.37194 Kyrgyzstan Som
1 Philippine Peso = 79.10272 Cambodia Riel
1 Philippine Peso = 8.33333 Comoros Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 17.70956 North Korean Won
1 Philippine Peso = 21.5429 Korean Won
1 Philippine Peso = 0.00594 Kuwaiti Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01614 Cayman Islands Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 6.52952 Kazakhstan Tenge
1 Philippine Peso = 163.2625 Lao Kip
1 Philippine Peso = 29.73239 Lebanese Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 3.02145 Sri Lanka Rupee
1 Philippine Peso = 2.44392 Liberian Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.27873 Lesotho Loti
1 Philippine Peso = 0.05999 Lithuanian Lita
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01221 Latvian Lat
1 Philippine Peso = 0.02676 Libyan Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.18535 Moroccan Dirham
1 Philippine Peso = 0.34406 Moldovan Leu
1 Philippine Peso = 1.02145 Macedonian Denar
1 Philippine Peso = 26.82015 Myanmar Kyat
1 Philippine Peso = 48.01181 Mongolian Tugrik
1 Philippine Peso = 0.15831 Macau Pataca
1 Philippine Peso = 6.91558 Mauritania Ougulya
1 Philippine Peso = 0.66706 Mauritius Rupee
1 Philippine Peso = 0.30638 Maldives Rufiyaa
1 Philippine Peso = 14.09681 Malawi Kwacha
1 Philippine Peso = 0.37473 Mexican Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 0.08186 Malaysian Ringgit
1 Philippine Peso = 0.27564 Namibian Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 7.02479 Nigerian Naira
1 Philippine Peso = 0.60232 Nicaragua Cordoba
1 Philippine Peso = 0.16201 Norwegian Krone
1 Philippine Peso = 2.03758 Nepalese Rupee
1 Philippine Peso = 0.02897 New Zealand Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.00757 Omani Rial
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01968 Panama Balboa
1 Philippine Peso = 0.06374 Peruvian Nuevo Sol
1 Philippine Peso = 0.06312 Papua New Guinea Kina
1 Philippine Peso = 1 Philippine Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 2.07261 Pakistani Rupee
1 Philippine Peso = 0.07062 Polish Zloty
1 Philippine Peso = 111.06651 Paraguayan Guarani
1 Philippine Peso = 0.07477 Qatar Rial
1 Philippine Peso = 0.07746 Romanian New Leu
1 Philippine Peso = 1.16854 Russian Rouble
1 Philippine Peso = 16.37721 Rwanda Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 0.07379 Saudi Arabian Riyal
1 Philippine Peso = 0.15368 Solomon Islands Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.26269 Seychelles Rupee
1 Philippine Peso = 0.13104 Sudanese Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 0.16586 Swedish Krona
1 Philippine Peso = 0.02669 Singapore Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01491 St Helena Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 0.43695 Slovak Koruna
1 Philippine Peso = 149.94097 Sierra Leone Leone
1 Philippine Peso = 10.99961 Somali Shilling
1 Philippine Peso = 408.72688 Sao Tome Dobra
1 Philippine Peso = 0.17218 El Salvador Colon
1 Philippine Peso = 10.13341 Syrian Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 0.2756 Swaziland Lilageni
1 Philippine Peso = 0.64542 Thai Baht
1 Philippine Peso = 0.04872 Tunisian Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.04538 Tongan paʻanga
1 Philippine Peso = 0.07647 Turkish Lira
1 Philippine Peso = 0.13045 Trinidad Tobago Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.59144 Taiwan Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 43.97875 Tanzanian Shilling
1 Philippine Peso = 0.52076 Ukraine Hryvnia
1 Philippine Peso = 71.36954 Ugandan Shilling
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01968 United States Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.57989 Uruguayan New Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 158.20543 Uzbekistan Sum
1 Philippine Peso = 0.19628 Venezuelan Bolivar
1 Philippine Peso = 446.89099 Vietnam Dong
1 Philippine Peso = 2.12515 Vanuatu Vatu
1 Philippine Peso = 0.05043 Samoa Tala
1 Philippine Peso = 10.9329 CFA Franc (BEAC)
1 Philippine Peso = 0.05313 East Caribbean Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 10.93861 CFA Franc (BCEAO)
1 Philippine Peso = 1.9754 Pacific Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 4.91834 Yemen Riyal
1 Philippine Peso = 0.27568 South African Rand
1 Philippine Peso = 102.11531 Zambian Kwacha
1 Philippine Peso = 7.12121 Zimbabwe dollar

Requiem for life

THERE is a reason the Bill of Rights in the 1987 Constitution starts with a recital of the hierarchy of rights: life, liberty, property. The recital is by no means arbitrary, and is meant to remind all of the primacy of human rights over property rights. No one can be deprived of these rights without undergoing due process of law, and you’ll notice that due process tends to become stricter when it comes to legal mechanisms to go against the right to life.

This means that the State, except in the most extreme and legally restricted cases, cannot execute any citizen without due process. Why? Simple. Because the right to life, once taken away, can never be given back. There is no commensurate compensation for it, which is why any form of damages awarded to the victim’s family is never called a payment. Simply put, no amount of money can restore life, once it is taken away.

If you have any doubt about the importance of the right to life, flip through the Revised Penal Code and find out for yourself that the crimes meted the most severe penalties have little to do with robbery or theft of property, but with taking human life, such as murder and homicide.

Obviously, our forefathers held life in such high regard that they deemed it fit to reserve the harshest penalties for those who take life. 

Similarly, the dictum of due process does not apply only to the rich, nor the poor, or those in positions of authority. The equal protection clause guarantees that due process applies to all, with no exception. Thus, everyone accused of committing a crime, guilty or innocent, has the right to be heard, to be tried, and to appeal a conviction in the higher courts. While this process may be exacting and very frustrating for some, especially to the families of victims of heinous crimes, we only have those gaming the system to blame.

I write this framed with the outrage of the death of 17-year old Kian Loyd delos Santos, an 11th grader who was murdered by policemen conducting anti-illegal drugs operations in Caloocan City. According to the spot report filed by one of the policemen conducting the operations, Kian had a gun and reportedly fired at the operatives. In short, nanlaban. Much like the 81 Filipinos dead in the last few days because of anti-illegal drug operations, all of them fought against the police who were supposedly in a hapless position and had to act in self defense. Does anyone really buy that canard, beyond internet trolls and propagandists?

CCTV footage along with four eyewitnesses belie the claim of the Caloocan police. Footage showed that Kian was dragged by two policemen in civilian clothes after he had closed shop for the night. Witnesses say that the boy pleaded for his life, and asked to be let go and said he had a test to take the next day. No mercy was given, and the 17-year old boy will no longer have to worry about a test, or whatever it is that teenagers worry about. His death is not the first; news outfits report that there have been at least thirty more minors that have been killed in the name of the War on Drugs. The youngest was Althea Barbon, 4 years of age. I doubt that propagandists can cast aspersions on Althea’s character, as they have mercilessly done on the others, owing to the fact that she cannot, by any stretch of imagination, have been an addict, a pusher, or a runner.

Some of us have been angry at the killings that have been a nightly occurrence since the new administration took over. Some have been quiet, secretly satisfied that their way home or the office is now free of petty criminals. And for some, what matters is that their hard-earned smartphone is safe from theft, their family shielded from the vermin of society. After all, are we not parochial at heart, first and foremost looking to protect our interests, come hell or high water?

But the outrage is palpable this time. Perhaps it is because the brazenness and impunity was caught on tape for all the world to see. Add this to the changing stories of the police, who even presented a witness to say that he bought drugs from Kian. Not only is the boy dead, but he continues to be subjected to further character assassination by policemen trying to paint him as another drug runner to justify why they had to drag a defenseless boy away.

Despite this, some will not care. Some will continue to cheer this War on Drugs, which in reality is nothing but a War on the Poor. Some will continue to revel in the false premise that the Philippines is becoming as safe as Singapore, and will continue to turn a blind eye to the mounting casualties. People are meant to die in wars, they say. People like drug addicts, drug lords, drug runners all deserve to die. As long as it is not my father, my mother, my spouse, my brother or my sister, they all deserve to die.

As if waking from a deep sleep, there are now those who have awakened to the horror of the situation and are loudly denouncing the deaths. Let them, and let us continue raising our voices. Imagine if Aragorn continued to hold a grudge against King Theoden for being under the spell of Wormtongue for years, then the War of the Rings may not have been won. The Scourge of Men–impunity and callousness, for the modern age–is upon us. For those of us who see through the haze, let us be kind to one another despite our differences, and continue to fight the battle for our humanity, whether it be online or offline.
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