June 24, 2018, 2:30 pm
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1 Philippine Peso = 0.06901 UAE Dirham
1 Philippine Peso = 2.02912 Albanian Lek
1 Philippine Peso = 0.03401 Neth Antilles Guilder
1 Philippine Peso = 0.5072 Argentine Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 0.02524 Australian Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.03345 Aruba Florin
1 Philippine Peso = 0.03758 Barbados Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 1.57159 Bangladesh Taka
1 Philippine Peso = 0.03155 Bulgarian Lev
1 Philippine Peso = 0.00712 Bahraini Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 32.90079 Burundi Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01879 Bermuda Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.02526 Brunei Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.1289 Bolivian Boliviano
1 Philippine Peso = 0.07111 Brazilian Real
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01879 Bahamian Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 1.28053 Bhutan Ngultrum
1 Philippine Peso = 0.19402 Botswana Pula
1 Philippine Peso = 376.17437 Belarus Ruble
1 Philippine Peso = 0.03754 Belize Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.02493 Canadian Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01856 Swiss Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 11.99061 Chilean Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 0.12218 Chinese Yuan
1 Philippine Peso = 54.75385 Colombian Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 10.57591 Costa Rica Colon
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01879 Cuban Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 1.77772 Cape Verde Escudo
1 Philippine Peso = 0.41526 Czech Koruna
1 Philippine Peso = 3.33615 Djibouti Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 0.12016 Danish Krone
1 Philippine Peso = 0.92728 Dominican Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 2.1963 Algerian Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.25225 Estonian Kroon
1 Philippine Peso = 0.33484 Egyptian Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 0.51146 Ethiopian Birr
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01612 Euro
1 Philippine Peso = 0.03918 Fiji Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01416 Falkland Islands Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01417 British Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 0.08979 Ghanaian Cedi
1 Philippine Peso = 0.87956 Gambian Dalasi
1 Philippine Peso = 169.07178 Guinea Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 0.14072 Guatemala Quetzal
1 Philippine Peso = 3.87599 Guyana Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.14741 Hong Kong Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.44878 Honduras Lempira
1 Philippine Peso = 0.11882 Croatian Kuna
1 Philippine Peso = 1.24803 Haiti Gourde
1 Philippine Peso = 5.23224 Hungarian Forint
1 Philippine Peso = 264.43067 Indonesian Rupiah
1 Philippine Peso = 0.06764 Israeli Shekel
1 Philippine Peso = 1.27568 Indian Rupee
1 Philippine Peso = 22.24728 Iraqi Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 798.38407 Iran Rial
1 Philippine Peso = 2.03119 Iceland Krona
1 Philippine Peso = 2.45509 Jamaican Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01333 Jordanian Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 2.06417 Japanese Yen
1 Philippine Peso = 1.89121 Kenyan Shilling
1 Philippine Peso = 1.28183 Kyrgyzstan Som
1 Philippine Peso = 76.00526 Cambodia Riel
1 Philippine Peso = 7.92522 Comoros Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 16.91094 North Korean Won
1 Philippine Peso = 20.86622 Korean Won
1 Philippine Peso = 0.00568 Kuwaiti Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01541 Cayman Islands Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 6.38595 Kazakhstan Tenge
1 Philippine Peso = 158.00451 Lao Kip
1 Philippine Peso = 28.292 Lebanese Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 2.98572 Sri Lanka Rupee
1 Philippine Peso = 2.74709 Liberian Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.25254 Lesotho Loti
1 Philippine Peso = 0.05728 Lithuanian Lita
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01166 Latvian Lat
1 Philippine Peso = 0.02548 Libyan Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.1786 Moroccan Dirham
1 Philippine Peso = 0.3177 Moldovan Leu
1 Philippine Peso = 0.98891 Macedonian Denar
1 Philippine Peso = 25.98647 Myanmar Kyat
1 Philippine Peso = 45.97896 Mongolian Tugrik
1 Philippine Peso = 0.15183 Macau Pataca
1 Philippine Peso = 6.67042 Mauritania Ougulya
1 Philippine Peso = 0.65295 Mauritius Rupee
1 Philippine Peso = 0.29256 Maldives Rufiyaa
1 Philippine Peso = 13.4053 Malawi Kwacha
1 Philippine Peso = 0.37584 Mexican Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 0.07518 Malaysian Ringgit
1 Philippine Peso = 0.25239 Namibian Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 6.72679 Nigerian Naira
1 Philippine Peso = 0.59207 Nicaragua Cordoba
1 Philippine Peso = 0.15205 Norwegian Krone
1 Philippine Peso = 2.03401 Nepalese Rupee
1 Philippine Peso = 0.02719 New Zealand Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.00723 Omani Rial
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01879 Panama Balboa
1 Philippine Peso = 0.06134 Peruvian Nuevo Sol
1 Philippine Peso = 0.0609 Papua New Guinea Kina
1 Philippine Peso = 1 Philippine Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 2.28222 Pakistani Rupee
1 Philippine Peso = 0.06966 Polish Zloty
1 Philippine Peso = 106.55769 Paraguayan Guarani
1 Philippine Peso = 0.06839 Qatar Rial
1 Philippine Peso = 0.07509 Romanian New Leu
1 Philippine Peso = 1.18236 Russian Rouble
1 Philippine Peso = 15.96073 Rwanda Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 0.07046 Saudi Arabian Riyal
1 Philippine Peso = 0.1479 Solomon Islands Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.25235 Seychelles Rupee
1 Philippine Peso = 0.33738 Sudanese Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 0.16635 Swedish Krona
1 Philippine Peso = 0.02551 Singapore Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01417 St Helena Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 0.41725 Slovak Koruna
1 Philippine Peso = 149.94363 Sierra Leone Leone
1 Philippine Peso = 10.72905 Somali Shilling
1 Philippine Peso = 394.98309 Sao Tome Dobra
1 Philippine Peso = 0.16441 El Salvador Colon
1 Philippine Peso = 9.67644 Syrian Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 0.25202 Swaziland Lilageni
1 Philippine Peso = 0.61856 Thai Baht
1 Philippine Peso = 0.04882 Tunisian Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.04333 Tongan paʻanga
1 Philippine Peso = 0.08786 Turkish Lira
1 Philippine Peso = 0.12682 Trinidad Tobago Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.56924 Taiwan Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 42.63435 Tanzanian Shilling
1 Philippine Peso = 0.49267 Ukraine Hryvnia
1 Philippine Peso = 72.51597 Ugandan Shilling
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01879 United States Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.59451 Uruguayan New Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 147.50094 Uzbekistan Sum
1 Philippine Peso = 1499.4363 Venezuelan Bolivar
1 Philippine Peso = 430.10147 Vietnam Dong
1 Philippine Peso = 2.07159 Vanuatu Vatu
1 Philippine Peso = 0.0488 Samoa Tala
1 Philippine Peso = 10.56614 CFA Franc (BEAC)
1 Philippine Peso = 0.05073 East Caribbean Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 10.56614 CFA Franc (BCEAO)
1 Philippine Peso = 1.92165 Pacific Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 4.69466 Yemen Riyal
1 Philippine Peso = 0.25241 South African Rand
1 Philippine Peso = 97.51033 Zambian Kwacha
1 Philippine Peso = 6.80008 Zimbabwe dollar

Reckless, foolish statement

US Defense Secretary Jim Mattis declared that the US will continue freedom of navigation operations (FONOPS) in the South China Sea notwithstanding China’s opposition to such operations, particularly near the controversial reefs reclaimed and militarily fortified by her. 
How I wish the US would, for a change, be more honest and forthright by admitting that her real intention for forever plying and monitoring the South China Sea (SCS) is simply to preserve and protect her domination of the Southeast Asian region, bolstered by her military presence in Japan, South Korea and the Philippines. 
Freedom of navigation operations?! Yeah, right! 
When did the US actually start harping on freedom of navigation and unimpeded flow of commerce in the SCS? Only when China decided to tell the world that she owns virtually the whole of the sea named after her and subsequently occupied, reclaimed and fortified some isles and reefs in the area. 
Expectedly, countries within the vicinity that have legitimate claims over certain areas in the SCS, including the Philippines, protested vigorously against what many believe is the ludicrous Chinese claim. 
What did the US do after that? Nothing, except to say that she is neutral insofar as territorial disputes are concerned and the usual call on all parties to settle their differences peacefully. 
But when China started reclaiming the isles and reefs that she illegally occupied and subsequently converted into military outposts complete with airstrips and missiles, the US naturally felt threatened. However, what she has built, China says, are only intended to protect an area that she claims to be her own. 
China, at the same time, said that like the US, she also wants to ensure freedom of navigation and the unimpeded flow of commerce in the sea lanes used to transport goods to and from other parts of the world. 
I personally believe that. China is one of the biggest, if not indeed the biggest, users of those sea lanes. It would, therefore, not be in her interest to restrict navigation and impede commerce flow in the area. If she did that, it would be like cutting her nose to spite her face. The US Navy and, conceivably, the navies of Japan, South Korea and Australia would be swarming all over the SCS to stop her from doing that. Of course, no one knows how such a situation could end up. 
***
In the meantime, Mattis asserts that China’s military buildup in the SCS and the deployment of high-end weapons systems is designed to intimidate and coerce her neighbors. How? By land invasion and/or aerial bombardment? 
I don’t buy that. 
China must know that the US will almost surely come to the defense of Japan, and perhaps South Korea too, should such a scenario occur. 
What about the Philippines? This is what Mattis said in Singapore recently when asked what the US would do in case of an attack against our territories disputed by China:
 “When we have discussions on these matters, the reason why public figures do not want to give specific answers is that these are complex issues…To simply turn it into a military and non-military response is short-changing the issue. This is what diplomacy is all about, taking contrary perspectives and finding common ground.”
No categorical commitment whatsoever notwithstanding the existence of a Mutual Defense Treaty between us. 
Mattis, of course, merely reiterated, in reply to the same question, ex-President Barack Obama’s “We don’t go around sending ships and threatening folks” and ex-Secretary of State Hillary Clinton’s “I don’t want to discuss hypothetical events but I want to underscore our commitment to the defense of the Philippines.”
Such gobbledygook! In other words, we cannot depend on the US to help safeguard our interests. That should by now be as plain as daylight for everyone to see.
I hope the Yellowtards, the critics (foreign and local), the US and her lackeys here and abroad, as well as the “Amboys” in the present government, now understand the position taken by President Rodrigo Roa Duterte aka Digong on the territorial disputes in the SCS. It is not anti-US or pro-China. It is pro-Philippines! 
Capeesh?!
***
Lt. Gen. Kenneth McKenzie, director of the office of the US military’s Joint Chiefs of Staff, said that the US has the ability to “blow apart” China’s controversial reclaimed isles turned into military outposts in the SCS.
 “I would just tell you (CNN) that the United States military has had a lot of experience in the Western Pacific taking down small islands… So that’s a core competency of the US military,” he said.
Although McKenzie said that no one should “read anything more into that than a simple statement of historical fact”, how else does he think China would interpret his statement, other than it being a warning or a threat? 
What a reckless, foolish and irresponsible statement, especially coming from a very high official in the US military establishment! Surely, he must know that US military bases in Japan, South Korea and the Philippines, are within range of China’s weaponry in the mainland. I presume China also has weapons capable of reaching the US.
This is precisely why the government has to take steps forthwith to rid the country of US troops as promised by Digong. We become a target in the event armed hostilities break out between China and the US.
Furthermore, since the US thinks China has no good intentions towards us and since she (US) would not commit herself to defending us, we ought to seriously consider forging a security treaty or at the very least, a non-aggression pact, with China.
Such a move should give us a modicum of assurance that China has no evil designs against us. And perhaps equally important, it will make the US stop trying to portray China as our potential enemy.
If China balks, Digong may have to re-visit and re-assess his foreign policy thrust.
***
REMINDERS
This segment is intended to remind the Duterte administration of some of its yet unfulfilled promises and matters that need attention and/or follow-up action. More importantly, the people are entitled to know what’s being done about them.

1) Digong’s promise to rid the country of foreign troops. This, of course, necessitates re-visiting the lopsided VFA and the EDCA with the US. 

2) Reciprocal visa arrangements with the US and other countries. (What is the DFA doing about this? Our embassy in Washington?)

3) The retrieval of the Balangiga bells. (Sources say the return of the bells is now awaiting a certification of some kind from the US Defense Department to be submitted to the US Congress. Is our embassy in Washington on top of this?)

4) The return of the Canadian waste. (Sources say the DOJ has filed a motion before the proper court for the importer to return the waste to Canada. No decision yet. No word about what Canada is doing.)
***
Today is the 38th day of the twelfth year of the enforced disappearance of Jonas Burgos, son of the late press icon and founder of this newspaper, Joe Burgos.
After the acquittal of Major Harry Baliaga, Jr., the only person formally charged with Jonas’ kidnapping, I guess what happens next is now up to Divine Providence.
***
From an internet friend:
Little Johnny and Silly Billy were engaging in the time-honored tradition of a verbal battle like little boys all over the world. “My Father is better than your Father!” Billy declared.
“No, he’s not!” Johnny responded.
“My brother is better than your brother!” Billy said.
“He is not! He is not!” yelled Little Johnny.
“My Mother is better than your Mother!” Billy continued.
A long pause ensued, then Little Johnny said, “Well, I guess ya got me there. I’ve heard my father say the same thing more than once.”
***
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