February 26, 2018, 5:35 am
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1 Philippine Peso = 0.0709 UAE Dirham
1 Philippine Peso = 2.0666 Albanian Lek
1 Philippine Peso = 0.03436 Neth Antilles Guilder
1 Philippine Peso = 0.38512 Argentine Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 0.0246 Australian Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.03436 Aruba Florin
1 Philippine Peso = 0.03861 Barbados Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 1.59981 Bangladesh Taka
1 Philippine Peso = 0.0307 Bulgarian Lev
1 Philippine Peso = 0.00727 Bahraini Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 33.8027 Burundi Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01931 Bermuda Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.02544 Brunei Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.13243 Bolivian Boliviano
1 Philippine Peso = 0.06249 Brazilian Real
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01931 Bahamian Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 1.24035 Bhutan Ngultrum
1 Philippine Peso = 0.18341 Botswana Pula
1 Philippine Peso = 386.48649 Belarus Ruble
1 Philippine Peso = 0.03857 Belize Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.02437 Canadian Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01807 Swiss Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 11.38996 Chilean Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 0.12225 Chinese Yuan
1 Philippine Peso = 54.88417 Colombian Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 10.92317 Costa Rica Colon
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01931 Cuban Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 1.73147 Cape Verde Escudo
1 Philippine Peso = 0.39788 Czech Koruna
1 Philippine Peso = 3.41371 Djibouti Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 0.11689 Danish Krone
1 Philippine Peso = 0.94363 Dominican Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 2.19764 Algerian Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.24563 Estonian Kroon
1 Philippine Peso = 0.34054 Egyptian Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 0.5251 Ethiopian Birr
1 Philippine Peso = 0.0157 Euro
1 Philippine Peso = 0.03853 Fiji Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01381 Falkland Islands Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01382 British Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 0.08607 Ghanaian Cedi
1 Philippine Peso = 0.90347 Gambian Dalasi
1 Philippine Peso = 173.55213 Guinea Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 0.14162 Guatemala Quetzal
1 Philippine Peso = 3.93494 Guyana Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.15101 Hong Kong Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.45448 Honduras Lempira
1 Philippine Peso = 0.11653 Croatian Kuna
1 Philippine Peso = 1.23243 Haiti Gourde
1 Philippine Peso = 4.90965 Hungarian Forint
1 Philippine Peso = 263.76448 Indonesian Rupiah
1 Philippine Peso = 0.06723 Israeli Shekel
1 Philippine Peso = 1.25268 Indian Rupee
1 Philippine Peso = 22.85714 Iraqi Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 718.33978 Iran Rial
1 Philippine Peso = 1.93822 Iceland Krona
1 Philippine Peso = 2.4222 Jamaican Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01364 Jordanian Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 2.0617 Japanese Yen
1 Philippine Peso = 1.96236 Kenyan Shilling
1 Philippine Peso = 1.311 Kyrgyzstan Som
1 Philippine Peso = 76.94981 Cambodia Riel
1 Philippine Peso = 7.70077 Comoros Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 17.37452 North Korean Won
1 Philippine Peso = 20.76255 Korean Won
1 Philippine Peso = 0.00578 Kuwaiti Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01583 Cayman Islands Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 6.1749 Kazakhstan Tenge
1 Philippine Peso = 159.87839 Lao Kip
1 Philippine Peso = 29.06178 Lebanese Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 2.99421 Sri Lanka Rupee
1 Philippine Peso = 2.50386 Liberian Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.22268 Lesotho Loti
1 Philippine Peso = 0.05886 Lithuanian Lita
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01198 Latvian Lat
1 Philippine Peso = 0.0257 Libyan Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.1777 Moroccan Dirham
1 Philippine Peso = 0.32037 Moldovan Leu
1 Philippine Peso = 0.96332 Macedonian Denar
1 Philippine Peso = 25.79151 Myanmar Kyat
1 Philippine Peso = 46.1583 Mongolian Tugrik
1 Philippine Peso = 0.15547 Macau Pataca
1 Philippine Peso = 6.75676 Mauritania Ougulya
1 Philippine Peso = 0.63514 Mauritius Rupee
1 Philippine Peso = 0.29614 Maldives Rufiyaa
1 Philippine Peso = 13.77317 Malawi Kwacha
1 Philippine Peso = 0.35764 Mexican Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 0.07562 Malaysian Ringgit
1 Philippine Peso = 0.22261 Namibian Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 6.9112 Nigerian Naira
1 Philippine Peso = 0.59556 Nicaragua Cordoba
1 Philippine Peso = 0.15133 Norwegian Krone
1 Philippine Peso = 1.99853 Nepalese Rupee
1 Philippine Peso = 0.02647 New Zealand Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.00743 Omani Rial
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01931 Panama Balboa
1 Philippine Peso = 0.06266 Peruvian Nuevo Sol
1 Philippine Peso = 0.06071 Papua New Guinea Kina
1 Philippine Peso = 1 Philippine Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 2.13127 Pakistani Rupee
1 Philippine Peso = 0.06552 Polish Zloty
1 Philippine Peso = 107.39382 Paraguayan Guarani
1 Philippine Peso = 0.07027 Qatar Rial
1 Philippine Peso = 0.07302 Romanian New Leu
1 Philippine Peso = 1.08832 Russian Rouble
1 Philippine Peso = 16.23803 Rwanda Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 0.07239 Saudi Arabian Riyal
1 Philippine Peso = 0.14989 Solomon Islands Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.25792 Seychelles Rupee
1 Philippine Peso = 0.34575 Sudanese Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 0.15762 Swedish Krona
1 Philippine Peso = 0.02545 Singapore Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01382 St Helena Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 0.42869 Slovak Koruna
1 Philippine Peso = 147.2973 Sierra Leone Leone
1 Philippine Peso = 10.84942 Somali Shilling
1 Philippine Peso = 384.74904 Sao Tome Dobra
1 Philippine Peso = 0.16892 El Salvador Colon
1 Philippine Peso = 9.9417 Syrian Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 0.22262 Swaziland Lilageni
1 Philippine Peso = 0.60579 Thai Baht
1 Philippine Peso = 0.04633 Tunisian Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.04271 Tongan paʻanga
1 Philippine Peso = 0.07317 Turkish Lira
1 Philippine Peso = 0.12974 Trinidad Tobago Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.56444 Taiwan Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 43.35907 Tanzanian Shilling
1 Philippine Peso = 0.52008 Ukraine Hryvnia
1 Philippine Peso = 70.40541 Ugandan Shilling
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01931 United States Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.54923 Uruguayan New Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 157.72201 Uzbekistan Sum
1 Philippine Peso = 558.39769 Venezuelan Bolivar
1 Philippine Peso = 438.97684 Vietnam Dong
1 Philippine Peso = 2.05502 Vanuatu Vatu
1 Philippine Peso = 0.04818 Samoa Tala
1 Philippine Peso = 10.28822 CFA Franc (BEAC)
1 Philippine Peso = 0.05212 East Caribbean Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 10.28822 CFA Franc (BCEAO)
1 Philippine Peso = 1.87297 Pacific Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 4.82336 Yemen Riyal
1 Philippine Peso = 0.22278 South African Rand
1 Philippine Peso = 100.1834 Zambian Kwacha
1 Philippine Peso = 6.98649 Zimbabwe dollar

Ramble on

TO the ministers of the Philippines’ partner-governments and other guests who attended the 50th Anniversary of ASEAN this week, we can say: Thanks to you we’re much obliged / For such a pleasant stay / But now it’s time for you to go / And with it pain.

MANILA — Japan’s new Foreign Minister Taro Kono on Monday brushed aside a provocative remark by his Chinese counterpart Wang Yi during their first talks since Kono assumed his post last week, saying he wants Beijing to “learn how to behave as a big power.” [https://japantoday.com/category/politics/update2-japan%27s-kono-asks-china-to-learn-how-to-behave-as-big-power]

According to the ASEAN Leaders’ Declaration of 08 August 2017, the 50th Anniversary of ASEAN “is a historic occasion that highlights our success in building an ASEAN Community that is rules-based, people-oriented, and people-centered.” With this Sentence 1, we may appreciate the ASEAN Parliamentarians for Human Rights Report on the Attacks on Lawmakers and the Threat to Cambodia’s Institutions, which in part says: “Parliamentarians have been victims of physical attacks – prominently in October 2015 when two CNRP MPs were brutally beaten by a pro-government mob outside the National Assembly – as well as verbal and online threats from CPP leaders, members, and supporters, and other forms of intimidation. These attacks and threats produce a climate of fear.” [Death Knell For Democracy, aseanmp.org]

Sentence 4 of the ASEAN Leaders’ Declaration: “As we move forward together, we will intensify our efforts to realize the goals of the ASEAN Community Vision 2025 under our theme of ‘One Vision, One Identity, One Community.’ We reaffirm our commitment to the effective, efficient and timely implementation of the ASEAN Political-Security Community Blueprint 2025, the ASEAN Economic Community Blueprint 2025, the ASEAN Socio-Cultural Community Blueprint 2025, the Master Plan on ASEAN Connectivity 2025 and the Initiative for ASEAN Integration Work Plan III. We underline the complementarities of these community building efforts with the UN 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development, which will help us meet our obligations and responsibilities in the global world order, including the realization of the UN Sustainable Development Goals.” 

How about Convention 151 of the International Labor Organization, which in Article 4 reads, “Public employees shall enjoy adequate protection against acts of anti-union discrimination in respect of their employment.” [http://www.ilo.org/dyn/normlex/en/f?p=NORMLEXPUB:12100:0::NO::P12100_INSTRUMENT_ID:312296]

ASEAN’s 50th was also celebrated with a Joint Communiqué Of The Foreign Ministers’ Meeting, which contained the following: “We reiterated our commitment to preserve the Southeast Asian region as a Nuclear Weapon Free Zone and free of all other weapons of mass destruction as enshrined in the Treaty on the Southeast Asia Nuclear Weapon-Free Zone (SEANWFZ Treaty) and the ASEAN Charter. We stressed the importance of the full and effective implementation of the SEANWFZ Treaty. We agreed to extend the Plan of Action to implement the SEANWFZ Treaty for another five-year period (2018-2022).”

Paragraph 21: “We welcomed the Philippines’ hosting of the 4th ASEANTOM Meeting in December 2017. We looked forward to the establishment of a formal partnership between the ASEAN Network of Regulatory Bodies on Atomic Energy and IAEA to promote greater cooperation and collaboration between the two bodies in the areas of nuclear safety, security and safeguards, including capacity building.”

The Communiqué came a day before the 72nd anniversary of the atomic bombing of Hiroshima, of which Mahatma Gandhi once told a reporter: “I will not go underground. I will not go into a shelter. I will come out in the open and let the pilot see I have not a trace of ill-will against him. The pilot will not see our faces from his great height, I know. But the longing in our hearts – that he will not come to harm – would reach up to him and his eyes would be opened.”

“If those thousands who were done to death in Hiroshima, if they had died with that prayerful action – their sacrifice would not have gone in vain.” [http://www.mkgandhi.org/articles/NuclearArms.htm]

In the City of Hiroshima this year, Mayor Matsui Kazumi called “especially on the Japanese government to manifest the pacifism in our constitution by doing everything in its power to bridge the gap between the nuclear-weapon and non-nuclear-weapon states, thereby facilitating the ratification of the Treaty on the Prohibition of Nuclear Weapons.”

The legally binding instrument to prohibit nuclear weapons (leading towards their total elimination), which recognized the efforts by the International Red Cross and Red Crescent Movement, religious leaders, parliamentarians, academics and the hibakusha, was adopted last 07 July with the affirmative votes of the Philippines, Fiji, Liechtenstein, State Of Palestine, New Zealand, Cuba, Republic Of Moldova, Ireland, and 114 other members of the General Assembly. [A/CONF.229/2017/8]

In Nagasaki, which also marked its 72nd anniversary as a recipient of an American plutonium bomb at the climax of the Pacific War, the Mayor said in the city’s annual Peace Declaration that the Abe Administration’s “stance of not even participating in the diplomatic negotiations for the Nuclear Prohibition Treaty is quite incomprehensible to those of us living in the cities that suffered atomic bombings.” Taue Tomihisa also called on his central government to “affirm to the world its commitment to the pacifist ethos of the Constitution of Japan, which firmly renounces war.” [https://english.kyodonews.net/news/2017/08/5aa303da110c-nagasaki-marks-72nd-anniversary-of-atomic-bombing.html]

Incidentally, the Nagasaki District Legal Affairs Bureau acknowledged that it had disposed of the rosters of the 3,400 Koreans who were conscripted as laborers at Mitsubishi Heavy Industries Nagasaki Shipyard in the city of Nagasaki during World War II. The discarded documents would have enabled the Korean workers to earn their Atomic Bomb Survivor’s Certificates. [https://mainichi.jp/english/articles/20170808p2a/00m/0na/011000c#cxrecs_s]

In Paragraph 192 the Foreign Ministers “reaffirmed the importance of maintaining and promoting peace, security, stability, safety and freedom of navigation in and over-flight above the South China Sea.”

Ramble on.
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