January 22, 2018, 8:55 am
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1 Philippine Peso = 0.07248 UAE Dirham
1 Philippine Peso = 2.15117 Albanian Lek
1 Philippine Peso = 0.03513 Neth Antilles Guilder
1 Philippine Peso = 0.37432 Argentine Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 0.02466 Australian Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.03513 Aruba Florin
1 Philippine Peso = 0.03947 Barbados Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 1.63391 Bangladesh Taka
1 Philippine Peso = 0.0315 Bulgarian Lev
1 Philippine Peso = 0.00743 Bahraini Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 34.55654 Burundi Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01974 Bermuda Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.02619 Brunei Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.13539 Bolivian Boliviano
1 Philippine Peso = 0.06307 Brazilian Real
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01974 Bahamian Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 1.25863 Bhutan Ngultrum
1 Philippine Peso = 0.19114 Botswana Pula
1 Philippine Peso = 395.1056 Belarus Ruble
1 Philippine Peso = 0.03943 Belize Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.02465 Canadian Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01899 Swiss Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 11.98717 Chilean Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 0.12629 Chinese Yuan
1 Philippine Peso = 56.09039 Colombian Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 11.14821 Costa Rica Colon
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01974 Cuban Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 1.78074 Cape Verde Escudo
1 Philippine Peso = 0.40983 Czech Koruna
1 Philippine Peso = 3.49517 Djibouti Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 0.12017 Danish Krone
1 Philippine Peso = 0.94356 Dominican Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 2.24754 Algerian Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.25256 Estonian Kroon
1 Philippine Peso = 0.34873 Egyptian Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 0.537 Ethiopian Birr
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01614 Euro
1 Philippine Peso = 0.03952 Fiji Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01423 Falkland Islands Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01424 British Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 0.08955 Ghanaian Cedi
1 Philippine Peso = 0.95481 Gambian Dalasi
1 Philippine Peso = 177.50149 Guinea Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 0.14478 Guatemala Quetzal
1 Philippine Peso = 4.06335 Guyana Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.15424 Hong Kong Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.4645 Honduras Lempira
1 Philippine Peso = 0.11993 Croatian Kuna
1 Philippine Peso = 1.2536 Haiti Gourde
1 Philippine Peso = 4.98796 Hungarian Forint
1 Philippine Peso = 262.6801 Indonesian Rupiah
1 Philippine Peso = 0.06734 Israeli Shekel
1 Philippine Peso = 1.2595 Indian Rupee
1 Philippine Peso = 23.36688 Iraqi Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 722.49855 Iran Rial
1 Philippine Peso = 2.02684 Iceland Krona
1 Philippine Peso = 2.44306 Jamaican Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01395 Jordanian Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 2.18305 Japanese Yen
1 Philippine Peso = 2.02388 Kenyan Shilling
1 Philippine Peso = 1.36803 Kyrgyzstan Som
1 Philippine Peso = 79.05665 Cambodia Riel
1 Philippine Peso = 8.11131 Comoros Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 17.76199 North Korean Won
1 Philippine Peso = 21.05013 Korean Won
1 Philippine Peso = 0.00592 Kuwaiti Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01618 Cayman Islands Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 6.40616 Kazakhstan Tenge
1 Philippine Peso = 163.40439 Lao Kip
1 Philippine Peso = 29.70989 Lebanese Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 3.03631 Sri Lanka Rupee
1 Philippine Peso = 2.51372 Liberian Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.24018 Lesotho Loti
1 Philippine Peso = 0.06017 Lithuanian Lita
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01225 Latvian Lat
1 Philippine Peso = 0.02645 Libyan Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.1822 Moroccan Dirham
1 Philippine Peso = 0.33221 Moldovan Leu
1 Philippine Peso = 0.99072 Macedonian Denar
1 Philippine Peso = 26.54431 Myanmar Kyat
1 Philippine Peso = 47.6416 Mongolian Tugrik
1 Philippine Peso = 0.15887 Macau Pataca
1 Philippine Peso = 6.94691 Mauritania Ougulya
1 Philippine Peso = 0.64535 Mauritius Rupee
1 Philippine Peso = 0.3059 Maldives Rufiyaa
1 Philippine Peso = 14.08092 Malawi Kwacha
1 Philippine Peso = 0.36718 Mexican Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 0.07768 Malaysian Ringgit
1 Philippine Peso = 0.24178 Namibian Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 7.06532 Nigerian Naira
1 Philippine Peso = 0.6045 Nicaragua Cordoba
1 Philippine Peso = 0.15516 Norwegian Krone
1 Philippine Peso = 2.01397 Nepalese Rupee
1 Philippine Peso = 0.02711 New Zealand Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.00759 Omani Rial
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01974 Panama Balboa
1 Philippine Peso = 0.06337 Peruvian Nuevo Sol
1 Philippine Peso = 0.06241 Papua New Guinea Kina
1 Philippine Peso = 1 Philippine Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 2.17782 Pakistani Rupee
1 Philippine Peso = 0.06737 Polish Zloty
1 Philippine Peso = 110.75588 Paraguayan Guarani
1 Philippine Peso = 0.07183 Qatar Rial
1 Philippine Peso = 0.07523 Romanian New Leu
1 Philippine Peso = 1.11021 Russian Rouble
1 Philippine Peso = 16.49398 Rwanda Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 0.07401 Saudi Arabian Riyal
1 Philippine Peso = 0.15294 Solomon Islands Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.26317 Seychelles Rupee
1 Philippine Peso = 0.13811 Sudanese Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 0.15903 Swedish Krona
1 Philippine Peso = 0.02605 Singapore Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01423 St Helena Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 0.43825 Slovak Koruna
1 Philippine Peso = 150.5822 Sierra Leone Leone
1 Philippine Peso = 11.09138 Somali Shilling
1 Philippine Peso = 395.67793 Sao Tome Dobra
1 Philippine Peso = 0.17269 El Salvador Colon
1 Philippine Peso = 10.16341 Syrian Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 0.24082 Swaziland Lilageni
1 Philippine Peso = 0.62838 Thai Baht
1 Philippine Peso = 0.04813 Tunisian Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.04392 Tongan paʻanga
1 Philippine Peso = 0.07512 Turkish Lira
1 Philippine Peso = 0.1331 Trinidad Tobago Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.57902 Taiwan Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 44.22736 Tanzanian Shilling
1 Philippine Peso = 0.56937 Ukraine Hryvnia
1 Philippine Peso = 71.46241 Ugandan Shilling
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01974 United States Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.56325 Uruguayan New Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 160.3513 Uzbekistan Sum
1 Philippine Peso = 0.19686 Venezuelan Bolivar
1 Philippine Peso = 447.97712 Vietnam Dong
1 Philippine Peso = 2.03691 Vanuatu Vatu
1 Philippine Peso = 0.0496 Samoa Tala
1 Philippine Peso = 10.5818 CFA Franc (BEAC)
1 Philippine Peso = 0.05329 East Caribbean Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 10.49813 CFA Franc (BCEAO)
1 Philippine Peso = 1.92441 Pacific Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 4.9329 Yemen Riyal
1 Philippine Peso = 0.24034 South African Rand
1 Philippine Peso = 102.41761 Zambian Kwacha
1 Philippine Peso = 7.14229 Zimbabwe dollar

Railroaded by a runaway TRAIN

While many in the communications profession would like to think of their field as a science where certain rules are followed, developed from hypotheses and postulates, tested and retested until theories turn into laws, and the scientific method is completed, its results uniformly verifiable each time, the academe still maintains communications as an art. 

It is perhaps because communications cannot be exact and definitive. It is nourished by diversity where conflicting interpretations are integral to its nature. Different points of view and the fluidity of both the messages communicated and the reception of those are largely as mosaic as a patchwork collage. No one hears music in exactly the same way. The same with viewing an artwork.

Art and communications are subjective, while sciences are objective. Art expresses knowledge. Science deals with the acquisition of knowledge.

Take the acronym “TRAIN” for example. Spun by our financial managers to communicate a desired message, TRAIN or Tax Reform for Acceleration and Inclusion, was coined by slick political hucksters to peddle a positive message that included the concepts of acceleration and economic inclusion. 

The messaging was purposely set to cast taxes in a positive light and differentiate this government’s current economic initiatives from the previous administration’s where, despite ballyhooed GDP growth, economic inclusion was denied the greater public.

Inclusivity as evoked by the initial “I” among TRAIN’s letters simply means that the greater public, across classes, are included as GDP grows. 

The measures of inclusivity would thus be the narrowing of the gap between the rich and the poor evidenced by the lowering of the Gini Coefficient. Inclusivity indices would also include the improvement in the jobs data where unemployment falls, new jobs are created, and the exodus of Filipino workers are reversed. 

Measures likewise include improvements in the poverty incidences, the hunger and misery indices and the inflation rate.

What we have been victimized with during the last administration is exclusive economic development where the GDP growth gains did not trickle down as fast to the sectors that needed these the most. Development and the economic benefits were thus “exclusive” and limited to the few who ironically needed those benefits to lesser degrees than the greater number continually victimized by inequities.

To validate the exclusivity of our GDP growth simply analyze how the Gini Coefficient had hardly changed, employment or the creation of new and appropriate jobs had virtually petrified, the hunger index and the self-rated poverty indices either worsening or staying virtually unchanged.

 As for the messaging that the government is attempting to communicate with the word “acceleration” and the letter “A” in TRAIN in reference to GDP growth, together with “inclusivity” in reference to economic equity, both can only enter a thoughtful mind when TRAIN’s letters are spelled out.

There lies its weakness as a communications devise. 

In fact, the word “train” by itself conjures an altogether different imagery.

Without spelling out each letter the immediate and unadulterated imagery conjured by the term TRAIN provides a deeper and more accurate insight into what it actually is that our honorable lawmakers might be thrusting up our collective posteriors.

The word “train” conjures images of a high-speed locomotive barreling down railway tracks. Not only does the image conjure of an unstoppable iron and steel behemoth such as a runaway freight train but that this rampaging “Iron Horse” will demolish anything in its path.

Following such imagery allow us to simply list what is being railroaded that are antithetical to accelerated GDP growth and equitable economic inclusivity as originally spun to market and make palatable added tax impositions.

Note that the only substantial tax reform measure in TRAIN is the expansion of the un-taxed income bracket where the lowest wage earners are effectively granted greater relief while higher tax payers pay more. The popular gains in this area are however quickly and effectively negated by substantive increases throughout all critical value chains as the excise taxes on cost-multiplier petroleum products are increased, and documentary stamp taxes and even taxes on passive income sources are bloated several times over. The latter are significant. These unnecessarily inflate debt servicing costs as well as costs on returns on investments.

On the existing repressive value added tax system (VAT), TRAIN ensures that we will remain victimized with one of the highest VAT impositions in the region.

On corporate taxes, the promised downscaling from 30 percent is not covered by TRAIN. We will still have the highest corporate taxes thus validating the fears of foreign investors who would rather reroute their foreign direct investments elsewhere.

Like communications, deception is also an art. While TRAIN is a catchy buzzword, what in effect are being railroaded are a series of expanded and debilitating tax measures simply packaged with a nice-sounding acronym.
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