December 16, 2017, 10:38 pm
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1 Philippine Peso = 2.28011 Algerian Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.26427 Estonian Kroon
1 Philippine Peso = 0.35252 Egyptian Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 0.5391 Ethiopian Birr
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01689 Euro
1 Philippine Peso = 0.04119 Fiji Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01488 Falkland Islands Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 0.0149 British Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 0.08949 Ghanaian Cedi
1 Philippine Peso = 0.93628 Gambian Dalasi
1 Philippine Peso = 177.61016 Guinea Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 0.14561 Guatemala Quetzal
1 Philippine Peso = 4.01171 Guyana Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.15502 Hong Kong Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.46602 Honduras Lempira
1 Philippine Peso = 0.12717 Croatian Kuna
1 Philippine Peso = 1.24851 Haiti Gourde
1 Philippine Peso = 5.30468 Hungarian Forint
1 Philippine Peso = 269.45216 Indonesian Rupiah
1 Philippine Peso = 0.0697 Israeli Shekel
1 Philippine Peso = 1.27173 Indian Rupee
1 Philippine Peso = 23.50139 Iraqi Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 706.60975 Iran Rial
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1 Philippine Peso = 2.47122 Jamaican Dollar
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1 Philippine Peso = 2.23456 Japanese Yen
1 Philippine Peso = 2.04347 Kenyan Shilling
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1 Philippine Peso = 17.86423 North Korean Won
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1 Philippine Peso = 0.33869 Moldovan Leu
1 Philippine Peso = 1.03414 Macedonian Denar
1 Philippine Peso = 27.03454 Myanmar Kyat
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1 Philippine Peso = 0.15967 Macau Pataca
1 Philippine Peso = 6.9869 Mauritania Ougulya
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1 Philippine Peso = 0.37963 Mexican Peso
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1 Philippine Peso = 0.60838 Nicaragua Cordoba
1 Philippine Peso = 0.16635 Norwegian Krone
1 Philippine Peso = 2.03573 Nepalese Rupee
1 Philippine Peso = 0.02839 New Zealand Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.00762 Omani Rial
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01985 Panama Balboa
1 Philippine Peso = 0.06535 Peruvian Nuevo Sol
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1 Philippine Peso = 1 Philippine Peso
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1 Philippine Peso = 111.57205 Paraguayan Guarani
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1 Philippine Peso = 1.1679 Russian Rouble
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1 Philippine Peso = 0.07443 Saudi Arabian Riyal
1 Philippine Peso = 0.15358 Solomon Islands Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.26852 Seychelles Rupee
1 Philippine Peso = 0.13219 Sudanese Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 0.16899 Swedish Krona
1 Philippine Peso = 0.02675 Singapore Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01489 St Helena Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 0.44077 Slovak Koruna
1 Philippine Peso = 151.44898 Sierra Leone Leone
1 Philippine Peso = 11.09567 Somali Shilling
1 Philippine Peso = 413.80507 Sao Tome Dobra
1 Philippine Peso = 0.17368 El Salvador Colon
1 Philippine Peso = 10.22191 Syrian Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 0.26054 Swaziland Lilageni
1 Philippine Peso = 0.6449 Thai Baht
1 Philippine Peso = 0.04961 Tunisian Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.04557 Tongan paʻanga
1 Philippine Peso = 0.07666 Turkish Lira
1 Philippine Peso = 0.13159 Trinidad Tobago Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.5944 Taiwan Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 44.30329 Tanzanian Shilling
1 Philippine Peso = 0.54875 Ukraine Hryvnia
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1 Philippine Peso = 0.01985 United States Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.57046 Uruguayan New Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 160.57959 Uzbekistan Sum
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1 Philippine Peso = 450.55577 Vietnam Dong
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1 Philippine Peso = 11.07165 CFA Franc (BEAC)
1 Philippine Peso = 0.05359 East Caribbean Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 11.49782 CFA Franc (BCEAO)
1 Philippine Peso = 2.00337 Pacific Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 4.96129 Yemen Riyal
1 Philippine Peso = 0.26079 South African Rand
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1 Philippine Peso = 7.18341 Zimbabwe dollar

Public shaming doesn’t work on erring cops

IN his Feb. 5 and 12 columns in Manila Bulletin, former President Fidel V. Ramos once again criticized President Duterte, whom he supported in the 2016 presidential elections.

This time, Ramos commented on Duterte’s public shaming of policemen-scalawags in the wake of reports of police officers who prey on South Korean tourists and the kidnapping and murder of south Korean businessman Jee Ick Joo.
Ramos, who was chief of the Philippine Constabulary during the Marcos administration before it became the Philippine National Police, said, “There is only one way to begin the cleansing of the ranks of the Philippine National Police and that is the same process we have to undertake in removing the corrupt from any organization the size of the PNP – that means start the internal cleansing at the very top of all government organizations with the heads, commander, chiefs of each agency/unit personally responsible and accountable for what his/her outfit (at whatever level, high or low) does or fails to do. “

He said at the start of his presidency in 1992, he and his secretary of Interior and Local Government Rafael Alunan (who is an avid supporter of Duterte) instituted an early retirement scheme for the PNP which started with 63 names. In the next three years, about 3,000 police personnel were dishonorably discharged or ‘forcibly retired ‘from the PNP,” FVR said.

“Avoid the undue shaming by mass punishments of government personnel in the presence of the public with media coverage,” FVR said.

Psychology and management experts say public shaming has not proven to be an effective form of discipline. One article said “public shaming begins to look like a tool designed not to humanely punish the person but rather to satisfy the crowd.”

Which was what Duterte did last Tuesday in Malacañang before 380 cops, none of them were involved in the reported extortion, kidnapping and killing of South Korean visitors.

An Interaksyon report said neither were they “ninja cops” - those who execute drug pushers and pocket merchandise and cash of the victim.

PNP chief Ronald dela Rosa and NCRPO director Oscar Albayalde said the policemen who had to endure Duterte’s tongue-lashing were being disciplined for minor infractions such as habitual tardiness and absenteeism.

Apparently, Duterte didn’t know because all he asked was “Kayo ang ipinadala dito ni Bato? “

The policemen, of course, “Yes, Sir.”

That cued him for his expletive-ridden performance : “Paano, dalawang taon lang sa pulis, gusto kotse kaagad, gusto ng bahay. Ito namang mga gago, na ulol kayo, kaya nga nag-iistambay, nagpapatrol na nandiyan sa mga bar, kaya iyong mga magaganda diyan, gusto ninyo inyo. Eh wala kayong pera, ayan. Ewan ko ilang tao na ang pinatay ninyo na inosente, na walang kamuwang-muwang. Pero hindi ko kayo palusutin, sa totoo lang. Huwag ninyo akong hamunin ng barilan, talagang papatulan ko kayo mga putang ina ninyo.” He said at first, he wanted them to clean the Pasig River which was full of water lilies that blocked the path of the presidential barge that brings him from Malacañang Park in the Otis where he stays to Malacañang Palace.

He wanted the policemen to eat those water lilies as punishment.

“Gusto ko kayong ihulog diyan pütang inang Pasig na iyan. Pero huwag na lang kasi itong Human Rights kung anong nakikita naman sa buhay ng isang taga-gobyerno na gustong disiplinahin kayo. Gusto ko palinisin ko kayo ng … magbalik kayo dito, mag-swimming trunks, linisin ninyo iyong Pasig River. Inumin ninyo kasi madumi, putang ina kayo,” he ranted.

But he said he changed his mind because the water lilies are gone. He said he decided to send them to Basilan: “So prepare to move out. Doon makita mo iyong kagaguhan mo doon. Ikuwentro mo doon Abu Sayyaf pati mga Tausug. Doon kayo. Täng ina ninyo. Buwisit kayo.”

After 10 minutes, he stopped to attend the cabinet meeting but told the policemen to stay put in an intense position and threatened that he will kick those who would relax. “Tumindig kayo diyan. Maghintay kayo. Kausapin ko kayo mamaya. Huwag kayong umalis diyan, iyang ganoong porma na iyan. Putang ina, buhusan ko kayo ng … Kapag may nakita ako nag-relax, sipain kita tingnan mo. Tumindig kayo diyan.””

There was no report of his coming back to the policemen. Maybe he found out he shamed the wrong cops. There was no report of an apology to the poor policemen.

It’s easy to dismiss it as a comedy of errors if only it didn’t involve one’s reputation and livelihood.

***

We asked FVR about the plan of Duterte to revive the Philippine Constabulary as a solution to the problematic PNP. “It’s big ‘No”, he said explaining that it would be messy and dangerous because the PC has a military component.

“Please allow the Philippine Constabulary to rest in peace – which it has earned honorably,” the former PC chief said.

As the 31st anniversary of the 1986 People Power revolution nears, Ramos found it fitting to quote from the writings of the late National Artist Nick Joaquin:

“Auxiliary to People Power was the veteran Philippine Constabulary, whose finest hour it was…

“Their official home, Camp Crame was the focus of the EDSA defiance. Constabulary troops were on the highway, at the Ortigas junction, in Greenhills, to defend the masses on EDSA from the Marines in Fort Bonifacio, the Army battalions in Tanay, the Air Force in Villamor.

“Those four days of EDSA had the PC capturing the government’s radio and TV facilities. Expeditionary troops to reinforce Camp Crame rushed in from PC commands in Cagayan, Bicolandia and Mindanao. It was the PC who seized and secured the airports in Manila and blocked the approaches to Metro Manila preventing the entry of Marcos-Ver reinforcements.

“And when Cory Aquino and Doy Laurel were sworn in as President and Veep of a restored democratic Republic, it was the PC who ringed the Club Filipino, to ensure the safety of the new government.

Through nine decades, the PC kept the peace in the Philippines pastoral as nobly and heroically as they could. But EDSA was their finest hour.”

***

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