December 18, 2017, 1:07 pm
Facebook iconTwitter iconYouTube iconGoogle+ icon
1 Philippine Peso = 0.07288 UAE Dirham
1 Philippine Peso = 2.24593 Albanian Lek
1 Philippine Peso = 0.03533 Neth Antilles Guilder
1 Philippine Peso = 0.34712 Argentine Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 0.02593 Australian Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.03533 Aruba Florin
1 Philippine Peso = 0.0397 Barbados Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 1.63815 Bangladesh Taka
1 Philippine Peso = 0.03288 Bulgarian Lev
1 Philippine Peso = 0.00748 Bahraini Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 34.75546 Burundi Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01985 Bermuda Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.02675 Brunei Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.13617 Bolivian Boliviano
1 Philippine Peso = 0.06539 Brazilian Real
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01985 Bahamian Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 1.2763 Bhutan Ngultrum
1 Philippine Peso = 0.20411 Botswana Pula
1 Philippine Peso = 397.3799 Belarus Ruble
1 Philippine Peso = 0.03965 Belize Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.02552 Canadian Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01965 Swiss Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 12.62406 Chilean Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 0.13118 Chinese Yuan
1 Philippine Peso = 59.40849 Colombian Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 11.184 Costa Rica Colon
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01985 Cuban Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 1.86245 Cape Verde Escudo
1 Philippine Peso = 0.43364 Czech Koruna
1 Philippine Peso = 3.50992 Djibouti Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 0.12575 Danish Krone
1 Philippine Peso = 0.94204 Dominican Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 2.28011 Algerian Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.26427 Estonian Kroon
1 Philippine Peso = 0.35252 Egyptian Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 0.5391 Ethiopian Birr
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01689 Euro
1 Philippine Peso = 0.04119 Fiji Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01488 Falkland Islands Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 0.0149 British Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 0.08949 Ghanaian Cedi
1 Philippine Peso = 0.93628 Gambian Dalasi
1 Philippine Peso = 177.61016 Guinea Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 0.14561 Guatemala Quetzal
1 Philippine Peso = 4.01171 Guyana Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.15502 Hong Kong Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.46602 Honduras Lempira
1 Philippine Peso = 0.12717 Croatian Kuna
1 Philippine Peso = 1.24851 Haiti Gourde
1 Philippine Peso = 5.30468 Hungarian Forint
1 Philippine Peso = 269.45216 Indonesian Rupiah
1 Philippine Peso = 0.0697 Israeli Shekel
1 Philippine Peso = 1.27173 Indian Rupee
1 Philippine Peso = 23.50139 Iraqi Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 706.60975 Iran Rial
1 Philippine Peso = 2.09111 Iceland Krona
1 Philippine Peso = 2.47122 Jamaican Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01404 Jordanian Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 2.23456 Japanese Yen
1 Philippine Peso = 2.04347 Kenyan Shilling
1 Philippine Peso = 1.38392 Kyrgyzstan Som
1 Philippine Peso = 79.89281 Cambodia Riel
1 Philippine Peso = 8.1582 Comoros Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 17.86423 North Korean Won
1 Philippine Peso = 21.58495 Korean Won
1 Philippine Peso = 0.00599 Kuwaiti Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01628 Cayman Islands Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 6.65919 Kazakhstan Tenge
1 Philippine Peso = 164.78761 Lao Kip
1 Philippine Peso = 29.88289 Lebanese Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 3.0389 Sri Lanka Rupee
1 Philippine Peso = 2.48432 Liberian Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.26141 Lesotho Loti
1 Philippine Peso = 0.06051 Lithuanian Lita
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01232 Latvian Lat
1 Philippine Peso = 0.02704 Libyan Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.1878 Moroccan Dirham
1 Philippine Peso = 0.33869 Moldovan Leu
1 Philippine Peso = 1.03414 Macedonian Denar
1 Philippine Peso = 27.03454 Myanmar Kyat
1 Philippine Peso = 48.15403 Mongolian Tugrik
1 Philippine Peso = 0.15967 Macau Pataca
1 Philippine Peso = 6.9869 Mauritania Ougulya
1 Philippine Peso = 0.67209 Mauritius Rupee
1 Philippine Peso = 0.30905 Maldives Rufiyaa
1 Philippine Peso = 14.16276 Malawi Kwacha
1 Philippine Peso = 0.37963 Mexican Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 0.08094 Malaysian Ringgit
1 Philippine Peso = 0.2608 Namibian Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 7.10599 Nigerian Naira
1 Philippine Peso = 0.60838 Nicaragua Cordoba
1 Philippine Peso = 0.16635 Norwegian Krone
1 Philippine Peso = 2.03573 Nepalese Rupee
1 Philippine Peso = 0.02839 New Zealand Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.00762 Omani Rial
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01985 Panama Balboa
1 Philippine Peso = 0.06535 Peruvian Nuevo Sol
1 Philippine Peso = 0.06434 Papua New Guinea Kina
1 Philippine Peso = 1 Philippine Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 2.17745 Pakistani Rupee
1 Philippine Peso = 0.07099 Polish Zloty
1 Philippine Peso = 111.57205 Paraguayan Guarani
1 Philippine Peso = 0.07225 Qatar Rial
1 Philippine Peso = 0.07797 Romanian New Leu
1 Philippine Peso = 1.1679 Russian Rouble
1 Philippine Peso = 16.58892 Rwanda Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 0.07443 Saudi Arabian Riyal
1 Philippine Peso = 0.15358 Solomon Islands Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.26852 Seychelles Rupee
1 Philippine Peso = 0.13219 Sudanese Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 0.16899 Swedish Krona
1 Philippine Peso = 0.02675 Singapore Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01489 St Helena Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 0.44077 Slovak Koruna
1 Philippine Peso = 151.44898 Sierra Leone Leone
1 Philippine Peso = 11.09567 Somali Shilling
1 Philippine Peso = 413.80507 Sao Tome Dobra
1 Philippine Peso = 0.17368 El Salvador Colon
1 Philippine Peso = 10.22191 Syrian Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 0.26054 Swaziland Lilageni
1 Philippine Peso = 0.6449 Thai Baht
1 Philippine Peso = 0.04961 Tunisian Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.04557 Tongan paʻanga
1 Philippine Peso = 0.07666 Turkish Lira
1 Philippine Peso = 0.13159 Trinidad Tobago Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.5944 Taiwan Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 44.30329 Tanzanian Shilling
1 Philippine Peso = 0.54875 Ukraine Hryvnia
1 Philippine Peso = 71.55617 Ugandan Shilling
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01985 United States Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.57046 Uruguayan New Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 160.57959 Uzbekistan Sum
1 Philippine Peso = 0.198 Venezuelan Bolivar
1 Philippine Peso = 450.55577 Vietnam Dong
1 Philippine Peso = 2.09845 Vanuatu Vatu
1 Philippine Peso = 0.05144 Samoa Tala
1 Philippine Peso = 11.07165 CFA Franc (BEAC)
1 Philippine Peso = 0.05359 East Caribbean Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 11.49782 CFA Franc (BCEAO)
1 Philippine Peso = 2.00337 Pacific Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 4.96129 Yemen Riyal
1 Philippine Peso = 0.26079 South African Rand
1 Philippine Peso = 103.00714 Zambian Kwacha
1 Philippine Peso = 7.18341 Zimbabwe dollar

The portfolio of environmental plunderers

It makes sense for presidents enamored with brusque and muscular authoritarianism to assign a fragile, sensitive and delicate portfolio such as that of the secretary of the Department of the Environment and Natural Resources (DENR) to either a military man or one trained in law enforcement accustomed to chains of command, the use of force and a largely vertical hierarchy that leaves very little room for democratic latitude, reasoning and debate. 

The need for testosterone is understandable. Where criminality is so widespread in far flung hinterlands, crooks among the richest, and government officials conflicted if not complicit with ravagers, the task at the DENR involves policing the most remote boondocks and the sticks against illegal loggers and destructive miners. The latter are, after all, well entrenched among the most powerful feudal fiefdoms and domestic dynasties who recognize no law save those from the barrel of a gun.

The criminality that challenges the DENR is not confined to the destruction of the environment. It includes the massacres of the innocent and the killings of environmental advocates, lumads and villagers standing in the way of profits.

The power these criminals wield is only occasionally visible in the chambers of the legislature and the corridors of the Executive Branch where money talks just as loud as the gunfire heard along mountain trails denuded by their greed and ravaged by their avarice. The millions spent on lobbying is as fatal as the alliances bought by moneyed miners and loggers to purchase and form into private armies the local official state militia culled from the ranks of the country’s legitimate armed forces.

The tendency then is to appoint at the DENR a lieutenant just as bold if not bolder than the environmental criminals. Someone with brass balls, wielding big sticks.

In recent history we have had two “good soldiers” at the DENR directly predicated by a martial culture regardless of their experience, qualifications, or even competence. It would appear that those latter three qualities which the public would naturally imagine as supremely critical are less important. So also are subordinated a profound sense of justice, a love of both the environment and the people directly affected by it, and a keen and forward-looking sense of the economic contributions that a living, breathing and protected environment can deliver to communities festering under the yoke of poverty and commercial exploitation.

This subordination has brought Philippine environmental management to the sorry state it is in.

Under the Arroyo administration the DENR appointee had been the former secretary of the Department of National Defense. One of the significant developments during his posting was to create interest en masse for foreign mining companies in exploiting our natural resources. However well-intentioned that today remains a continuing controversy involving unconscionable offshore earnings at the expense of domestic environmental costs some consider as virtual pillaging.

Arroyo’s appointee held sequentially, each in an acting capacity, two other portfolios at the Department of the Interior and Local Governments and the Department of Energy (DOE). While never confirmed on any of these, his DENR appointment made sense. The armed forces, the police and local government officials are either complicit or conspiratorial on environmental concerns. On the DOE, continuously increasing toxic killer coal in the fuel mix is an on-going debate given the global warming issue. Indeed law enforcement and local government management are integral to the DENR’s  job.

Following brazen corporate lobbying against the impactful “Heart and Mind” policies of former Secretary Regina Paz  Lopez, we again have an ex-soldier manning DENR’s gates. 

Greeted with virtual dancing in the boardrooms of mining companies, loggers and power producers, within weeks reports of toxic mercury poisoning broke out.

As a response the new DENR secretary simply formed a task force. That woefully fails to appreciate the profound reality where mercury poisoning represents the endemic criminality continuously inflicted by miners whether they are green-washed as responsible during the their operations or are set free and unaccountable after their mines close down and a statute of limitations lapses.

In Palawan, an abandoned mercury mine continues to poison fish, livestock and people. Reports say residents of at least two villages with a total population of over 10,000 continue to suffer from mercury poisoning from their exposure to mine tailings and from feeding from mercury-contaminated marine food.

Note that 10,000 innocents poisoned is exponentially more than even large multinational mining companies can employ during its “responsible mining” operations. Even when we factor-in economic multipliers.

In the abandoned mine the principal sources of the poisoning are the exposed remnant ores, a three-hectare pit and landfills from which seepage contaminates aquifers and drains out to a bay that hosts over a million tourists yearly. Imagine an unrecognized crisis of epidemic proportions.

The criminality inflicted by such mines perpetuates long after the last dollar spent by politicians purchased with lobby money. These cannot be solved by forming an ad hoc task force.

The vetting model that justifies appointing unqualified one-dimensional enforcers at the DENR needs to be revisited. We do not need task forces quickly assembled to address short term needs. The Palawan mercury mine has been poisoning for over seventy years. Neither do we need gatekeepers nor night-watchmen. Otherwise the criminal exploitation of critical resources perpetuates as does the fatal victimization of our weakest and most impoverished communities.
Rating: 
Average: 5 (1 vote)

Column of the Day

Safe toys...

By DAHLI ASPILLERA | December 18,2017
‘CNN Hero of the Year Efren Peñaflorida.... Yes! President Duterte’s excellent choice to head PCUP.’

Opinion of the Day

Duterte’s mind-boggling numbers

By ELLEN TORDESILLAS | December 18, 2017
‘But since it’s the President talking, we expect his numbers to be accurate because he is supposed to have access to official reports.’