April 23, 2018, 9:50 pm
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1 Philippine Peso = 0.07044 UAE Dirham
1 Philippine Peso = 2.01285 Albanian Lek
1 Philippine Peso = 0.03414 Neth Antilles Guilder
1 Philippine Peso = 0.3869 Argentine Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 0.02498 Australian Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.03414 Aruba Florin
1 Philippine Peso = 0.03836 Barbados Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 1.59992 Bangladesh Taka
1 Philippine Peso = 0.03047 Bulgarian Lev
1 Philippine Peso = 0.00723 Bahraini Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 33.58228 Burundi Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01918 Bermuda Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.025 Brunei Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.13157 Bolivian Boliviano
1 Philippine Peso = 0.06531 Brazilian Real
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01918 Bahamian Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 1.26103 Bhutan Ngultrum
1 Philippine Peso = 0.18432 Botswana Pula
1 Philippine Peso = 383.96625 Belarus Ruble
1 Philippine Peso = 0.03832 Belize Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.02447 Canadian Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01871 Swiss Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 11.4346 Chilean Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 0.12071 Chinese Yuan
1 Philippine Peso = 52.91139 Colombian Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 10.76908 Costa Rica Colon
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01918 Cuban Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 1.72344 Cape Verde Escudo
1 Philippine Peso = 0.3961 Czech Koruna
1 Philippine Peso = 3.39145 Djibouti Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 0.1164 Danish Krone
1 Philippine Peso = 0.94764 Dominican Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 2.1869 Algerian Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.24445 Estonian Kroon
1 Philippine Peso = 0.33832 Egyptian Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 0.52167 Ethiopian Birr
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01562 Euro
1 Philippine Peso = 0.03879 Fiji Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01369 Falkland Islands Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01368 British Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 0.08493 Ghanaian Cedi
1 Philippine Peso = 0.89893 Gambian Dalasi
1 Philippine Peso = 172.6122 Guinea Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 0.1407 Guatemala Quetzal
1 Philippine Peso = 3.94879 Guyana Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.15041 Hong Kong Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.4519 Honduras Lempira
1 Philippine Peso = 0.11558 Croatian Kuna
1 Philippine Peso = 1.23341 Haiti Gourde
1 Philippine Peso = 4.85501 Hungarian Forint
1 Philippine Peso = 266.4557 Indonesian Rupiah
1 Philippine Peso = 0.06754 Israeli Shekel
1 Philippine Peso = 1.26972 Indian Rupee
1 Philippine Peso = 22.70809 Iraqi Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 805.52361 Iran Rial
1 Philippine Peso = 1.92079 Iceland Krona
1 Philippine Peso = 2.37438 Jamaican Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01359 Jordanian Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 2.06782 Japanese Yen
1 Philippine Peso = 1.91408 Kenyan Shilling
1 Philippine Peso = 1.31497 Kyrgyzstan Som
1 Philippine Peso = 76.83161 Cambodia Riel
1 Philippine Peso = 7.65286 Comoros Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 17.26122 North Korean Won
1 Philippine Peso = 20.47315 Korean Won
1 Philippine Peso = 0.00575 Kuwaiti Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01573 Cayman Islands Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 6.25738 Kazakhstan Tenge
1 Philippine Peso = 158.78405 Lao Kip
1 Philippine Peso = 28.8646 Lebanese Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 2.99962 Sri Lanka Rupee
1 Philippine Peso = 2.50441 Liberian Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.23188 Lesotho Loti
1 Philippine Peso = 0.05847 Lithuanian Lita
1 Philippine Peso = 0.0119 Latvian Lat
1 Philippine Peso = 0.02539 Libyan Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.17621 Moroccan Dirham
1 Philippine Peso = 0.31433 Moldovan Leu
1 Philippine Peso = 0.95589 Macedonian Denar
1 Philippine Peso = 25.29728 Myanmar Kyat
1 Philippine Peso = 45.79977 Mongolian Tugrik
1 Philippine Peso = 0.15492 Macau Pataca
1 Philippine Peso = 6.75105 Mauritania Ougulya
1 Philippine Peso = 0.64212 Mauritius Rupee
1 Philippine Peso = 0.29862 Maldives Rufiyaa
1 Philippine Peso = 13.71883 Malawi Kwacha
1 Philippine Peso = 0.35542 Mexican Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 0.07476 Malaysian Ringgit
1 Philippine Peso = 0.23032 Namibian Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 6.88531 Nigerian Naira
1 Philippine Peso = 0.59455 Nicaragua Cordoba
1 Philippine Peso = 0.15025 Norwegian Krone
1 Philippine Peso = 2.02693 Nepalese Rupee
1 Philippine Peso = 0.02661 New Zealand Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.00738 Omani Rial
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01918 Panama Balboa
1 Philippine Peso = 0.06167 Peruvian Nuevo Sol
1 Philippine Peso = 0.06232 Papua New Guinea Kina
1 Philippine Peso = 1 Philippine Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 2.21711 Pakistani Rupee
1 Philippine Peso = 0.06525 Polish Zloty
1 Philippine Peso = 105.81128 Paraguayan Guarani
1 Philippine Peso = 0.06981 Qatar Rial
1 Philippine Peso = 0.07297 Romanian New Leu
1 Philippine Peso = 1.17426 Russian Rouble
1 Philippine Peso = 16.19889 Rwanda Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 0.07192 Saudi Arabian Riyal
1 Philippine Peso = 0.14921 Solomon Islands Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.25758 Seychelles Rupee
1 Philippine Peso = 0.34621 Sudanese Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 0.1621 Swedish Krona
1 Philippine Peso = 0.02526 Singapore Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01369 St Helena Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 0.42589 Slovak Koruna
1 Philippine Peso = 146.33679 Sierra Leone Leone
1 Philippine Peso = 10.79785 Somali Shilling
1 Philippine Peso = 382.92676 Sao Tome Dobra
1 Philippine Peso = 0.16782 El Salvador Colon
1 Philippine Peso = 9.87687 Syrian Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 0.2317 Swaziland Lilageni
1 Philippine Peso = 0.60153 Thai Baht
1 Philippine Peso = 0.04709 Tunisian Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.04287 Tongan paʻanga
1 Philippine Peso = 0.07793 Turkish Lira
1 Philippine Peso = 0.12937 Trinidad Tobago Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.56552 Taiwan Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 43.65171 Tanzanian Shilling
1 Philippine Peso = 0.50153 Ukraine Hryvnia
1 Philippine Peso = 70.73264 Ugandan Shilling
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01918 United States Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.54066 Uruguayan New Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 154.48792 Uzbekistan Sum
1 Philippine Peso = 1138.30075 Venezuelan Bolivar
1 Philippine Peso = 436.67051 Vietnam Dong
1 Philippine Peso = 2.02071 Vanuatu Vatu
1 Philippine Peso = 0.04846 Samoa Tala
1 Philippine Peso = 10.24242 CFA Franc (BEAC)
1 Philippine Peso = 0.05178 East Caribbean Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 10.24242 CFA Franc (BCEAO)
1 Philippine Peso = 1.85386 Pacific Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 4.79287 Yemen Riyal
1 Philippine Peso = 0.23169 South African Rand
1 Philippine Peso = 99.53011 Zambian Kwacha
1 Philippine Peso = 6.94093 Zimbabwe dollar

Phaseout of jeepneys

I SUPPOSE the phaseout of jeepneys that are 15 years old or older has already started. The government decreed that they should be removed from the streets starting this month as part of its transport modernization program. 
President Rodrigo Roa Duterte aka Digong admonished the Pinagkaisang Samahan ng mga Tsuper at Opereytor Nationwide (Piston) for opposing the program with the warning that “come January 1, if I see an unregistered jeepney, old ones, I will have it towed in front of you. If you want disarray, I have lots of policemen.” 
“There is a time for friendship and there is a time to be reasonable and there is a time for reconciliation and a time for hatred,” Digong said. 
“Filipinos are at stake here. I am the president of the nation. I have to abandon the civilities and the niceties of life. When I was mayor, you were my friends…This time I am the president of the Republic of the Philippines and it’s not about me. It’s about the law,” he added. 
Presidential spokesman Harry Roque said “the public utility vehicle modernization program of the Duterte administration is not anti-poor, contrary to the claims of some transport groups.” 
And, if I may add, the Philippine Permanent Representative to the United Nations in New York, Teodoro Locsin, Jr. 
Locsin asked the government to reconsider the phaseout of the jeepneys and instead consider banning luxury cars that cost more than $20,000. 
Just how many luxury cars are there in the country that are used for daily commuting by the owners? And will banning them really help ease the gridlock we have everyday all over Metro Manila and other cities? 
“Just extend interest free loans to jeepney owners to keep the old banged up appearance that bears the scars of Philippine history. Just change the engine to that of a Benz,” Locsin said. 
Huh? Wouldn’t that be less practical and more expensive than replacing the old jeepneys with the proposed vehicle that Locsin considers “silly and infantile”? 

MARIJUANA FOR EXPORT

According to a CNN report, there is a growing number of countries that have legalized the use of marijuana or cannabis for medical and recreational purposes. And the list is getting longer. 
Consequently, the world demand for the weed has also significantly increased. 
Already, the Australian government said it was legalizing overseas exports of marijuana products for medical uses. 
“We’d like to potentially be the world’s number one supplier,” its health minister said. 
CNN also reported that a US-based market research and consulting firm forecast that the global market for medicinal marijuana would hit more than $55 billion by 2025. 
CNN cited Canada and The Netherlands as the major producers of medicinal marijuana, while import markets include Germany and Croatia. 
In the US, recreational use of marijuana is being legalized on a state-by-state basis. California has already done it effective January 1 this year. Canada is expected to follow soon. 
CNN said that according to Marijuana Business Daily, recreational sales for marijuana are expected to total $7.1 billion to $10.3 billion in the U.S. by 2021. 
I’ve read and heard of clandestine marijuana planting in the country. We could be a big supplier of the weed if we legalized its cultivation strictly for exports only, under stringent governmental regulations and supervision, couldn’t we? It would help a lot of marginal farmers in the countryside earn more. It could also be a good source of much-needed foreign exchange. 
Just thinking aloud, but it’s an idea that the Department of Agriculture and other relevant agencies may wish to explore. 

DIGONG’S
ANTI-CORRUPTION DRIVE

Next on the chopping block of Digong of government officials who travel too much could be CHED head Patricia Licuanan. The last one was Marcial Amaro of Marina. He followed Terry Ridon of the Presidential Commission on the Urban Poor and Development Academy of the Philippines head Elba Cruz.
Licuanan was once asked to stop attending Cabinet meetings, but for some reason managed to stick to her job. 
But what I cannot help wondering about is the complaint made by Digong’s new appointee as board member of the Philippine Charity Sweepstakes Office (PCSO), Sandra Cam.
Cam accused PCSO chief Alexander Balutan of allegedly spending P10 million for the agency’s Christmas party in the luxury five-star Shangrila Hotel on Edsa. 
Balutan claimed only P5 million was spent for the party.
As I said in my last column, P5 million, by any stretch of the imagination, is too much for a party, especially for a government office whose existence it owes to the majority of the poor people who shell out a few pesos each lottery draw in the fervent hope that they’d win and get them out of their misery. Theirs is the same money that the PCSO revelers spent for their party.
Presidential spokesman Harry Roque, at the time, said: “I think you know that the President does not tolerate extravagance… I’m sure the President will look into the matter.” 
Has he? Nothing has been heard about the matter since. 
In the meantime, Cam and Balutan are squabbling and hurling accusations against each other which obviously is not good for the agency. What is Digong going to do about it? 

SERENO

I daresay Chief Justice Lourdes Sereno’s goose is cooked. 
With 10 out of 14 of her colleagues in the high court testifying against her, I think her ouster is a foregone conclusion. 
And even if she survives impeachment, how could she function effectively with the majority of her colleagues against her? Without any respect for her? 
I join others who believe that her best recourse would be to resign effective immediately… unless there is truth to the rumor that she is banking on being bailed out by an unnamed tycoon who will pay every senator who votes to acquit her P200 million. 
It’s a wild story but then again, we have seen it happen before for a much lesser amount, albeit paid for a guilty vote. 
*** 
I would like to express sincere condolences to the family of our esteemed publisher, Amado “Jake” P. Macasaet, who passed away last Sunday morning. May the Almighty grant him eternal peace. 
*** 
REMINDERS
This segment is intended to remind the administration of some of its yet unfulfilled promises and matters that need attention and/or follow-up action.
1) Digong’s promise to rid the country of foreign troops. This, of course, includes re-visiting the lopsided VFA and the EDCA with the US.
2) Reciprocal visa arrangements with the US and other countries.
3) The retrieval of the Balangiga bells.
4) The return of the Canadian waste.
5) The immediate implementation of the FOI.
*** 
Today is the 243rd day of the eleventh year of the enforced disappearance of Jonas Burgos, son of the late press icon and founder of this newspaper.
After the acquittal of Major Harry Baliaga, Jr., the only person formally charged with Jonas’ kidnapping, I guess what happens next is now up to Divine Providence.
*** 
From an internet friend: 
Two nerdy male students meet on campus one day.
One of them notices that the other is on a shiny new racing bike.
He calls out to the other: “Hey -- nice bike! Where did you get it?” 
“Well,” replies the other, “I was walking to class the other day when this pretty, young co-ed rides up on this bike. She jumps off, takes off all of her clothes, and says ‘You can have ANYTHING you want!!’” 
“Good choice,” says the first, “her clothes wouldn’t have fit you anyway.” 
*** 
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