January 22, 2018, 12:44 am
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1 Philippine Peso = 0.07248 UAE Dirham
1 Philippine Peso = 2.15117 Albanian Lek
1 Philippine Peso = 0.03513 Neth Antilles Guilder
1 Philippine Peso = 0.37432 Argentine Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 0.02466 Australian Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.03513 Aruba Florin
1 Philippine Peso = 0.03947 Barbados Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 1.63391 Bangladesh Taka
1 Philippine Peso = 0.0315 Bulgarian Lev
1 Philippine Peso = 0.00743 Bahraini Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 34.55654 Burundi Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01974 Bermuda Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.02619 Brunei Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.13539 Bolivian Boliviano
1 Philippine Peso = 0.06307 Brazilian Real
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01974 Bahamian Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 1.25863 Bhutan Ngultrum
1 Philippine Peso = 0.19114 Botswana Pula
1 Philippine Peso = 395.1056 Belarus Ruble
1 Philippine Peso = 0.03943 Belize Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.02465 Canadian Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01899 Swiss Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 11.98717 Chilean Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 0.12629 Chinese Yuan
1 Philippine Peso = 56.09039 Colombian Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 11.14821 Costa Rica Colon
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01974 Cuban Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 1.78074 Cape Verde Escudo
1 Philippine Peso = 0.40983 Czech Koruna
1 Philippine Peso = 3.49517 Djibouti Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 0.12017 Danish Krone
1 Philippine Peso = 0.94356 Dominican Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 2.24754 Algerian Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.25256 Estonian Kroon
1 Philippine Peso = 0.34873 Egyptian Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 0.537 Ethiopian Birr
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01614 Euro
1 Philippine Peso = 0.03952 Fiji Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01423 Falkland Islands Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01424 British Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 0.08955 Ghanaian Cedi
1 Philippine Peso = 0.95481 Gambian Dalasi
1 Philippine Peso = 177.50149 Guinea Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 0.14478 Guatemala Quetzal
1 Philippine Peso = 4.06335 Guyana Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.15424 Hong Kong Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.4645 Honduras Lempira
1 Philippine Peso = 0.11993 Croatian Kuna
1 Philippine Peso = 1.2536 Haiti Gourde
1 Philippine Peso = 4.98796 Hungarian Forint
1 Philippine Peso = 262.6801 Indonesian Rupiah
1 Philippine Peso = 0.06734 Israeli Shekel
1 Philippine Peso = 1.2595 Indian Rupee
1 Philippine Peso = 23.36688 Iraqi Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 722.49855 Iran Rial
1 Philippine Peso = 2.02684 Iceland Krona
1 Philippine Peso = 2.44306 Jamaican Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01395 Jordanian Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 2.18305 Japanese Yen
1 Philippine Peso = 2.02388 Kenyan Shilling
1 Philippine Peso = 1.36803 Kyrgyzstan Som
1 Philippine Peso = 79.05665 Cambodia Riel
1 Philippine Peso = 8.11131 Comoros Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 17.76199 North Korean Won
1 Philippine Peso = 21.05013 Korean Won
1 Philippine Peso = 0.00592 Kuwaiti Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01618 Cayman Islands Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 6.40616 Kazakhstan Tenge
1 Philippine Peso = 163.40439 Lao Kip
1 Philippine Peso = 29.70989 Lebanese Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 3.03631 Sri Lanka Rupee
1 Philippine Peso = 2.51372 Liberian Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.24018 Lesotho Loti
1 Philippine Peso = 0.06017 Lithuanian Lita
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01225 Latvian Lat
1 Philippine Peso = 0.02645 Libyan Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.1822 Moroccan Dirham
1 Philippine Peso = 0.33221 Moldovan Leu
1 Philippine Peso = 0.99072 Macedonian Denar
1 Philippine Peso = 26.54431 Myanmar Kyat
1 Philippine Peso = 47.6416 Mongolian Tugrik
1 Philippine Peso = 0.15887 Macau Pataca
1 Philippine Peso = 6.94691 Mauritania Ougulya
1 Philippine Peso = 0.64535 Mauritius Rupee
1 Philippine Peso = 0.3059 Maldives Rufiyaa
1 Philippine Peso = 14.08092 Malawi Kwacha
1 Philippine Peso = 0.36718 Mexican Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 0.07768 Malaysian Ringgit
1 Philippine Peso = 0.24178 Namibian Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 7.06532 Nigerian Naira
1 Philippine Peso = 0.6045 Nicaragua Cordoba
1 Philippine Peso = 0.15516 Norwegian Krone
1 Philippine Peso = 2.01397 Nepalese Rupee
1 Philippine Peso = 0.02711 New Zealand Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.00759 Omani Rial
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01974 Panama Balboa
1 Philippine Peso = 0.06337 Peruvian Nuevo Sol
1 Philippine Peso = 0.06241 Papua New Guinea Kina
1 Philippine Peso = 1 Philippine Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 2.17782 Pakistani Rupee
1 Philippine Peso = 0.06737 Polish Zloty
1 Philippine Peso = 110.75588 Paraguayan Guarani
1 Philippine Peso = 0.07183 Qatar Rial
1 Philippine Peso = 0.07523 Romanian New Leu
1 Philippine Peso = 1.11021 Russian Rouble
1 Philippine Peso = 16.49398 Rwanda Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 0.07401 Saudi Arabian Riyal
1 Philippine Peso = 0.15294 Solomon Islands Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.26317 Seychelles Rupee
1 Philippine Peso = 0.13811 Sudanese Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 0.15903 Swedish Krona
1 Philippine Peso = 0.02605 Singapore Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01423 St Helena Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 0.43825 Slovak Koruna
1 Philippine Peso = 150.5822 Sierra Leone Leone
1 Philippine Peso = 11.09138 Somali Shilling
1 Philippine Peso = 395.67793 Sao Tome Dobra
1 Philippine Peso = 0.17269 El Salvador Colon
1 Philippine Peso = 10.16341 Syrian Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 0.24082 Swaziland Lilageni
1 Philippine Peso = 0.62838 Thai Baht
1 Philippine Peso = 0.04813 Tunisian Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.04392 Tongan paʻanga
1 Philippine Peso = 0.07512 Turkish Lira
1 Philippine Peso = 0.1331 Trinidad Tobago Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.57902 Taiwan Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 44.22736 Tanzanian Shilling
1 Philippine Peso = 0.56937 Ukraine Hryvnia
1 Philippine Peso = 71.46241 Ugandan Shilling
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01974 United States Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.56325 Uruguayan New Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 160.3513 Uzbekistan Sum
1 Philippine Peso = 0.19686 Venezuelan Bolivar
1 Philippine Peso = 447.97712 Vietnam Dong
1 Philippine Peso = 2.03691 Vanuatu Vatu
1 Philippine Peso = 0.0496 Samoa Tala
1 Philippine Peso = 10.5818 CFA Franc (BEAC)
1 Philippine Peso = 0.05329 East Caribbean Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 10.49813 CFA Franc (BCEAO)
1 Philippine Peso = 1.92441 Pacific Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 4.9329 Yemen Riyal
1 Philippine Peso = 0.24034 South African Rand
1 Philippine Peso = 102.41761 Zambian Kwacha
1 Philippine Peso = 7.14229 Zimbabwe dollar

No more gaffes

ABOUT three weeks ago, former Foreign Secretary Perfecto Yasay, Jr. said the Association of Southeast Asian Nations (Asean) was unsettled and had “grave concern” about China’s move to militarize man-made islands, including installation of weapons systems, in the South China Sea.
He made the announcement after a foreign ministers’ meeting of the Association in Boracay. Interestingly, his statement came shortly after the US State Department expressed the same concern.
Quite expectedly, China did not take kindly to Yasay’s assertion. Consequently, Beijing abruptly decided to cancel the scheduled trip of the Chinese commerce minister’s trip to Manila to sign joint projects worth billions of dollars. 
The Chinese foreign ministry spokesman said Yasay’s remarks “were not consistent with the healthy and rapidly developing ties between China and the Philippines.”
Yasay later denied it was his statement that caused the cancellation of the Chinese minister’s trip.
Just the same, President Rodrigo Roa Duterte aka Digong found it necessary to reiterate his assurance to China that he will not raise, at this time, her reported militarization of, or the arbitral ruling favoring the Philippine claim to, the disputed areas.
“You know, time and again, when I went to China, I said we are not prepared to raise the issue of the arbitration award for the simple reason that we are yet to finalize the good relations between China and the Philippines. We cannot talk if we are still fighting. We should become friends first so when we face each other, there is respect and dignity on both sides,” Digong said.
And so, he appealed to the Chinese to reconsider their decision. They did.
Digong was “happy” to meet with Chinese commerce minister Zhong San and his delegation in Malacañang last week.
He told Zhong his decision to follow an independent “neutral” policy was the correct one.
“I also told him that, you know, we are in Asia, far from the maddening crowd of Europe… Sabi ko, ang swerte natin nandito sa Asia and since China is the leading industrial power, we’ll have to ally with them in trade and commerce and eventually improve on the bilateral relations and come out with a vibrant economy,” he said.
Digong also thanked China for her aid to the earthquake-hit Surigao.
The point I’m making here is that with Digong’s foreign policy already clear as daylight, i.e., “friends to all who would be friends with us, while at the same time maintaining the ‘good’ ties with old ones, and with only the national interest as the overriding consideration”, I am confident that such gaffes as the one committed by Yasay will not occur again while professionals are in charge of the Department of Foreign Affairs.
The art of diplomacy and its nuances cannot be learned overnight. It takes years and years of experience and exposure in the realm of international relations to acquire sufficient knowledge and expertise to be able to ply it… well, ably.
***
The sheer enormity, the gravity and the magnitude of the illegal drug problem in the country that Digong inherited couldn’t possibly have happened just before he took over.
Everyone knows that the problem is the direct result of six years of utter neglect by the previous Aquino administration to stem the proliferation of the killer drug shabu. The huge shabu factories discovered by Digong did not sprout overnight. One of the biggest found was in Tarlac, Aquino’s own turf.
The De Lima case alone shows that the drug problem couldn’t have deteriorated so badly without the knowledge and probable connivance of some officials in the Aquino regime.
For this reason, many were happy to learn that the anti-crime group Volunteers Against Crime and Corruption (VACC) led by the indefatigable Dante Jimenez is “following up on several solid leads and will develop the case against other Aquino officials as soon as we can.”
VACC general counsel Ferdinand Topacio reportedly said:
“Looking at the evidence thus far uncovered holistically, the legal team has come to the alarming and terrifying conclusion that the Bilibid drug trade may not be confined to the Department of Justice during the time of Senator De Lima, but may go beyond that to other departments of government in the Aquino administration, and involving officials higher than then Justice Secretary De Lima.”
“The magnitude of the amounts involved, the huge number of participants and the impunity and cover-up concerning the illegal trading of drugs in the NBP justify the conclusion that it was a wider network than previously believed, and that its tentacles extended all the way to Malacañang Palace during the Aquino regime,” he added.
I believe it is incumbent upon the administration’s concerned agencies to lend a helping hand to the VACC to facilitate its investigation and case build-up.
***
She is no different from the person who appointed her as Ombudsman. Like ex-President Noynoy Aquino, she does not know or believe in the principle of command responsibility.
How can Conchita Carpio-Morales possibly indict former Budget Secretary Florencio Abad for the unconstitutional and illegal Development Acceleration Program (DAP) and absolve Aquino at the same time?
A percentage of the DAP was even allegedly used to bribe some senators and congressmen to impeach the late Supreme Court chief justice Renato Corona.
As Rep. Carlos Zarate of Bayan Muna said, Morales’ decision “is wanting for failing to indict the former president, who was ultimately responsible for DAP.”
 “It is highly unacceptable why Aquino was spared when his very signature appears on the DAP (memorandum),” he said.
Morales’ decision on the Abad/Aquino case is reminiscent of the one she rendered in the case of former MRT boss Al Vitangcol whom she indicted for alleged corruption while absolving his boss, former Transportation chief Antonio Abaya, who signed the anomalous contract. Abaya was a close associate of Aquino and ex-DILG head Mar Roxas.
***
Morales was a recipient of the Ramon Magsaysay Award last year for “restoring the faith in the rule of law”.
In receiving the Award, Morales reportedly claimed that she “radically improved the efficacy and credibility” of the Ombudsman and “has shown the way towards a more coherent, concerted action against corruption.”
Really now? I find that hard to believe.
Is it any wonder then why there are calls from several quarters for her impeachment?
***
Today is the 321st day of the tenth year of Jonas Burgos’ enforced disappearance.
The family and friends of Jonas hope that the Duterte administration will not be part of the continuing cover-up. The Burgos family implores Digong to haul the perpetrators to justice and bring Jonas back home even with the appointment of Gen. Eduardo Ano as AFP chief who was implicated in the abduction of Jonas almost ten years ago.
***
From an internet friend:

I had the toughest time of my life. First, I got angina pectoris and then arteriosclerosis. 
Just as I was recovering from these, I got tuberculosis, double pneumonia and phthisis, then they gave me hypodermics. 
Appendicitis was followed by tonsillectomy. 
These gave way to aphasia and hypertrophic cirrhosis. I completely lost my memory for a while. 
I know I had diabetes and acute ingestion, besides gastritis, rheumatism, lumbago and neuritis...
I don’t know how I pulled through it all. It was the hardest spelling test I’ve ever had.
***
Email: roacrosshairs@outlook.com
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