November 18, 2017, 7:05 am
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1 Philippine Peso = 0.07227 UAE Dirham
1 Philippine Peso = 2.22452 Albanian Lek
1 Philippine Peso = 0.03503 Neth Antilles Guilder
1 Philippine Peso = 0.34355 Argentine Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 0.02607 Australian Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.03503 Aruba Florin
1 Philippine Peso = 0.03935 Barbados Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 1.64187 Bangladesh Taka
1 Philippine Peso = 0.0327 Bulgarian Lev
1 Philippine Peso = 0.00742 Bahraini Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 34.29713 Burundi Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01968 Bermuda Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.02667 Brunei Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.13499 Bolivian Boliviano
1 Philippine Peso = 0.0645 Brazilian Real
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01968 Bahamian Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 1.28247 Bhutan Ngultrum
1 Philippine Peso = 0.20681 Botswana Pula
1 Philippine Peso = 393.93939 Belarus Ruble
1 Philippine Peso = 0.03931 Belize Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.02511 Canadian Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01951 Swiss Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 12.40988 Chilean Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 0.13051 Chinese Yuan
1 Philippine Peso = 59.13813 Colombian Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 11.08422 Costa Rica Colon
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01968 Cuban Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 1.83943 Cape Verde Escudo
1 Philippine Peso = 0.42677 Czech Koruna
1 Philippine Peso = 3.47954 Djibouti Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 0.12411 Danish Krone
1 Philippine Peso = 0.94451 Dominican Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 2.25075 Algerian Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.2609 Estonian Kroon
1 Philippine Peso = 0.34652 Egyptian Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 0.53227 Ethiopian Birr
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01667 Euro
1 Philippine Peso = 0.04117 Fiji Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.0149 Falkland Islands Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01491 British Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 0.0895 Ghanaian Cedi
1 Philippine Peso = 0.92483 Gambian Dalasi
1 Philippine Peso = 177.2137 Guinea Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 0.14447 Guatemala Quetzal
1 Philippine Peso = 4.05313 Guyana Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.15372 Hong Kong Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.46232 Honduras Lempira
1 Philippine Peso = 0.12613 Croatian Kuna
1 Philippine Peso = 1.21291 Haiti Gourde
1 Philippine Peso = 5.19481 Hungarian Forint
1 Philippine Peso = 266.09603 Indonesian Rupiah
1 Philippine Peso = 0.06915 Israeli Shekel
1 Philippine Peso = 1.27847 Indian Rupee
1 Philippine Peso = 22.9634 Iraqi Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 693.36875 Iran Rial
1 Philippine Peso = 2.02755 Iceland Krona
1 Philippine Peso = 2.47068 Jamaican Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01392 Jordanian Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 2.21558 Japanese Yen
1 Philippine Peso = 2.03994 Kenyan Shilling
1 Philippine Peso = 1.37194 Kyrgyzstan Som
1 Philippine Peso = 79.10272 Cambodia Riel
1 Philippine Peso = 8.33333 Comoros Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 17.70956 North Korean Won
1 Philippine Peso = 21.5429 Korean Won
1 Philippine Peso = 0.00594 Kuwaiti Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01614 Cayman Islands Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 6.52952 Kazakhstan Tenge
1 Philippine Peso = 163.2625 Lao Kip
1 Philippine Peso = 29.73239 Lebanese Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 3.02145 Sri Lanka Rupee
1 Philippine Peso = 2.44392 Liberian Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.27873 Lesotho Loti
1 Philippine Peso = 0.05999 Lithuanian Lita
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01221 Latvian Lat
1 Philippine Peso = 0.02676 Libyan Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.18535 Moroccan Dirham
1 Philippine Peso = 0.34406 Moldovan Leu
1 Philippine Peso = 1.02145 Macedonian Denar
1 Philippine Peso = 26.82015 Myanmar Kyat
1 Philippine Peso = 48.01181 Mongolian Tugrik
1 Philippine Peso = 0.15831 Macau Pataca
1 Philippine Peso = 6.91558 Mauritania Ougulya
1 Philippine Peso = 0.66706 Mauritius Rupee
1 Philippine Peso = 0.30638 Maldives Rufiyaa
1 Philippine Peso = 14.09681 Malawi Kwacha
1 Philippine Peso = 0.37473 Mexican Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 0.08186 Malaysian Ringgit
1 Philippine Peso = 0.27564 Namibian Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 7.02479 Nigerian Naira
1 Philippine Peso = 0.60232 Nicaragua Cordoba
1 Philippine Peso = 0.16201 Norwegian Krone
1 Philippine Peso = 2.03758 Nepalese Rupee
1 Philippine Peso = 0.02897 New Zealand Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.00757 Omani Rial
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01968 Panama Balboa
1 Philippine Peso = 0.06374 Peruvian Nuevo Sol
1 Philippine Peso = 0.06312 Papua New Guinea Kina
1 Philippine Peso = 1 Philippine Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 2.07261 Pakistani Rupee
1 Philippine Peso = 0.07062 Polish Zloty
1 Philippine Peso = 111.06651 Paraguayan Guarani
1 Philippine Peso = 0.07477 Qatar Rial
1 Philippine Peso = 0.07746 Romanian New Leu
1 Philippine Peso = 1.16854 Russian Rouble
1 Philippine Peso = 16.37721 Rwanda Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 0.07379 Saudi Arabian Riyal
1 Philippine Peso = 0.15368 Solomon Islands Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.26269 Seychelles Rupee
1 Philippine Peso = 0.13104 Sudanese Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 0.16586 Swedish Krona
1 Philippine Peso = 0.02669 Singapore Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01491 St Helena Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 0.43695 Slovak Koruna
1 Philippine Peso = 149.94097 Sierra Leone Leone
1 Philippine Peso = 10.99961 Somali Shilling
1 Philippine Peso = 408.72688 Sao Tome Dobra
1 Philippine Peso = 0.17218 El Salvador Colon
1 Philippine Peso = 10.13341 Syrian Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 0.2756 Swaziland Lilageni
1 Philippine Peso = 0.64542 Thai Baht
1 Philippine Peso = 0.04872 Tunisian Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.04538 Tongan paʻanga
1 Philippine Peso = 0.07647 Turkish Lira
1 Philippine Peso = 0.13045 Trinidad Tobago Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.59144 Taiwan Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 43.97875 Tanzanian Shilling
1 Philippine Peso = 0.52076 Ukraine Hryvnia
1 Philippine Peso = 71.36954 Ugandan Shilling
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01968 United States Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.57989 Uruguayan New Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 158.20543 Uzbekistan Sum
1 Philippine Peso = 0.19628 Venezuelan Bolivar
1 Philippine Peso = 446.89099 Vietnam Dong
1 Philippine Peso = 2.12515 Vanuatu Vatu
1 Philippine Peso = 0.05043 Samoa Tala
1 Philippine Peso = 10.9329 CFA Franc (BEAC)
1 Philippine Peso = 0.05313 East Caribbean Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 10.93861 CFA Franc (BCEAO)
1 Philippine Peso = 1.9754 Pacific Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 4.91834 Yemen Riyal
1 Philippine Peso = 0.27568 South African Rand
1 Philippine Peso = 102.11531 Zambian Kwacha
1 Philippine Peso = 7.12121 Zimbabwe dollar

Mine, mine, mine! Miners all...

The Mining Industry Coordinating Council (MICC) is hard pressed to find much wrong with  open pit surface mining.   “Doable and lucrative”--describes open pit surface mining, according to MICC.    If the MICC succeeds in putting enough influence, pressure, arm-twisting, etc. on Natural Resources Secretary Roy Cimatu, open pit mining  will be A-OK again for DENR.   MICC cannot possibly police mines since it has for its leader a lawyer with full sympathy for mine owners.  Also, MICC co-chair is Finance Secretary Carlos G. Dominguez,  who from all indications sees no wrong in these  local mining ethics. 

Larry Heradez, head of the Mines & Geosciences Bureau’s legal division is in tune with MICC.  Heradez was part of a team that reviewed those Gina Lopez policy orders suspending illegally operating mines.   Among those that Heradez reviewed were the cancellation of 75 contracts of undeveloped mines to protect watersheds.   Heradez:  “Some of the 75 contracts may still be canceled; not because the projects are within watersheds,  but because of possible violations, like non-payment of taxes and non-implementation of work program.”  Heradez sees mining activities in watersheds acceptable, as long as taxes are paid and work programs (?)  are implemented.  Did he ask, para que these  watersheds?  Are watersheds useful?

Mining veteran and ex-banker Gerard Brimo, president and chief executive officer of Nickel Asia Corp. is new chair of  Chamber of Mines of the Philippines (COMP) to lead the mining industry in navigating a challenging regulatory environment.  COMP struggles with the definition of “responsible mining” (Philippine Mining Act).  Owners are mandated to  “set up a rehabilitation fund to make the mine area as  productive after all ores are extracted.”   There is not enough money in the pocket of an owner to effectively  rehabilitate any open pit mine such as those poisoned pits sitting all over the Philippines today.  How does one rehabilitate a poisoned open pit?   Poisoned pits  are historically abandoned to poison Filipinos for centuries.   COMP  vice chairs are Gilberto Teodoro, defense chief during the Macapagal-Arroyo regime and now chair of Sagittarius Mines; Jose Leviste Jr., chair of Oceana Gold Philippines.  

Excerpt from Alyansa Tigil Mina (ATM):  “Mining will permanently change the physical and ecological landscape of an area. The same mining tenement has a river, a forest, or in a fragile island-ecosystem.  The same mine facilities are impacting the coastal areas for fishers and the irrigation for farmers.  The same mine project is within ancestral domains, and therefore require Free, Prior and Informed Consent (FPIC) from indigenous communities.  The same mining project introduces environmental, social and political impacts. 

“To reduce the mining audit to a ‘technical exercise’ and the mining industry as an ‘economic driver’ sans the social and environmental safeguards, defeats the purpose of establishing what is a ‘responsible mine’.  This reveals the hollowed and minimal understanding of the mining industry and how to implement ‘responsible mining’.  This is not the path to social justice....”

Open pit surface mining’s business maneuvering serves Team Miners’ mission.  While this bunch recognizes  the money-making potential  of open pit mining, the environment and people’s communities around open pits will suffer unspeakable punishment.  Open pit is horrendous beyond words.

Once this Team Miners  has completed its review of all previous policy orders and made recommendations to neglect  watersheds, they will be submitted to Environment Secretary Roy Cimatu, who then “can revise or amend or supersede.  With the advice and consent of mine owners?   Cimatu  has been taking a slow approach towards mining; what to do about the mining operations and contracts ordered closed, suspended or canceled.   A  former military chief, Cimatu told media it was possible to “strike a balance between mining and natural resources.”  Mining vs natural resources!   A diametrically opposing missions seeing the unmoderated greed of certain mine owners. The people are hoping that Cimatu would go  after such miners who operate illegally for increased profit in rural and mountainous areas, affect farmlands, mangroves, rivers, and shorelines where the poor live and engage in livelihood – farmers, indigenous peoples, and subsistence fishermen.

Data from the Mines and Geosciences Bureau (MGB) revealed that the total metallic production value grew by P2.08 billion in the first six months of the year, from P48.73 billion in the same period in 2016 to P50.81 billion.   “Gold price was on the upswing in the first half particularly due to strong investment demand.”  The yellow metal was upbeat at US$1,238.46 per troy ounce in the first half, from US$1,217.85 per troy ounce year-on-year, a US$20.61 increase.   Masbate Gold Project of Filminera Mining Corporation & Philippine Gold Processing and Refining Corporation in Bicol Province as well as OceanaGold Philippines, Inc. in Cagayan Province were the country’s major gold producers.

All these upswings in production and income!  Still,  Filipino soil handlers inside mines are left with coins after paying the company sari-sari store.  Their families still eating two meals a day.  Irresponsible illegal mine owners privatize benefits and socialize costs.   

***

Dahliaspillera@yahoo.com
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Column of the Day

Thumbs up and down at Asean

By JOSE BAYANI BAYLON | November 17,2017
‘This is the issue of the general public’s grasp of what it means for our country to be part of a greater, regional association of nations.’

Opinion of the Day

Onward: Planned Parenthood; Human Rights summit

By DAHLI ASPILLERA | November 17, 2017
‘Congratulations to the country’s PNP, AFP and all law enforcers, for a productive, uninterrupted, impressive Asean Summit. Great talents had put together a successful show.’