July 23, 2017, 8:35 am
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1 Philippine Peso = 0.07443 UAE Dirham
1 Philippine Peso = 2.4017 Albanian Lek
1 Philippine Peso = 0.03628 Neth Antilles Guilder
1 Philippine Peso = 0.32436 Argentine Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 0.02723 Australian Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.03626 Aruba Florin
1 Philippine Peso = 0.04054 Barbados Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 1.63579 Bangladesh Taka
1 Philippine Peso = 0.03534 Bulgarian Lev
1 Philippine Peso = 0.00763 Bahraini Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 34.60377 Burundi Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 0.02027 Bermuda Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.02797 Brunei Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.13904 Bolivian Boliviano
1 Philippine Peso = 0.06579 Brazilian Real
1 Philippine Peso = 0.02027 Bahamian Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 1.30624 Bhutan Ngultrum
1 Philippine Peso = 0.20692 Botswana Pula
1 Philippine Peso = 405.75598 Belarus Ruble
1 Philippine Peso = 0.04049 Belize Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.02733 Canadian Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01952 Swiss Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 13.57175 Chilean Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 0.13799 Chinese Yuan
1 Philippine Peso = 58.59343 Colombian Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 11.43535 Costa Rica Colon
1 Philippine Peso = 0.02027 Cuban Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 1.98075 Cape Verde Escudo
1 Philippine Peso = 0.47231 Czech Koruna
1 Philippine Peso = 3.59951 Djibouti Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 0.13357 Danish Krone
1 Philippine Peso = 0.95278 Dominican Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 2.19181 Algerian Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.28109 Estonian Kroon
1 Philippine Peso = 0.36583 Egyptian Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 0.46433 Ethiopian Birr
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01797 Euro
1 Philippine Peso = 0.04244 Fiji Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01573 Falkland Islands Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01572 British Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 0.08685 Ghanaian Cedi
1 Philippine Peso = 0.91021 Gambian Dalasi
1 Philippine Peso = 182.75233 Guinea Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 0.1491 Guatemala Quetzal
1 Philippine Peso = 4.14512 Guyana Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.15784 Hong Kong Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.47422 Honduras Lempira
1 Philippine Peso = 0.13229 Croatian Kuna
1 Philippine Peso = 1.24625 Haiti Gourde
1 Philippine Peso = 5.54195 Hungarian Forint
1 Philippine Peso = 269.57844 Indonesian Rupiah
1 Philippine Peso = 0.07211 Israeli Shekel
1 Philippine Peso = 1.30521 Indian Rupee
1 Philippine Peso = 23.93595 Iraqi Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 657.62059 Iran Rial
1 Philippine Peso = 1.9771 Iceland Krona
1 Philippine Peso = 2.6139 Jamaican Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01433 Jordanian Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 2.23666 Japanese Yen
1 Philippine Peso = 2.0906 Kenyan Shilling
1 Philippine Peso = 1.38113 Kyrgyzstan Som
1 Philippine Peso = 81.57681 Cambodia Riel
1 Philippine Peso = 9.12404 Comoros Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 18.24078 North Korean Won
1 Philippine Peso = 22.6366 Korean Won
1 Philippine Peso = 0.00614 Kuwaiti Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01662 Cayman Islands Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 6.364 Kazakhstan Tenge
1 Philippine Peso = 166.08836 Lao Kip
1 Philippine Peso = 30.51277 Lebanese Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 3.08877 Sri Lanka Rupee
1 Philippine Peso = 1.84435 Liberian Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.25922 Lesotho Loti
1 Philippine Peso = 0.06179 Lithuanian Lita
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01258 Latvian Lat
1 Philippine Peso = 0.02821 Libyan Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.19642 Moroccan Dirham
1 Philippine Peso = 0.36735 Moldovan Leu
1 Philippine Peso = 1.09972 Macedonian Denar
1 Philippine Peso = 27.52331 Myanmar Kyat
1 Philippine Peso = 48.27726 Mongolian Tugrik
1 Philippine Peso = 0.16258 Macau Pataca
1 Philippine Peso = 7.25578 Mauritania Ougulya
1 Philippine Peso = 0.70024 Mauritius Rupee
1 Philippine Peso = 0.31394 Maldives Rufiyaa
1 Philippine Peso = 14.54094 Malawi Kwacha
1 Philippine Peso = 0.37863 Mexican Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 0.08672 Malaysian Ringgit
1 Philippine Peso = 0.2604 Namibian Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 6.52615 Nigerian Naira
1 Philippine Peso = 0.59972 Nicaragua Cordoba
1 Philippine Peso = 0.17055 Norwegian Krone
1 Philippine Peso = 2.08654 Nepalese Rupee
1 Philippine Peso = 0.02835 New Zealand Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.00779 Omani Rial
1 Philippine Peso = 0.02027 Panama Balboa
1 Philippine Peso = 0.06622 Peruvian Nuevo Sol
1 Philippine Peso = 0.06654 Papua New Guinea Kina
1 Philippine Peso = 1 Philippine Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 2.11897 Pakistani Rupee
1 Philippine Peso = 0.0753 Polish Zloty
1 Philippine Peso = 112.82935 Paraguayan Guarani
1 Philippine Peso = 0.0738 Qatar Rial
1 Philippine Peso = 0.08196 Romanian New Leu
1 Philippine Peso = 1.14766 Russian Rouble
1 Philippine Peso = 16.61897 Rwanda Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 0.076 Saudi Arabian Riyal
1 Philippine Peso = 0.16004 Solomon Islands Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.26836 Seychelles Rupee
1 Philippine Peso = 0.13498 Sudanese Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 0.17451 Swedish Krona
1 Philippine Peso = 0.02797 Singapore Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01573 St Helena Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 0.45006 Slovak Koruna
1 Philippine Peso = 152.00649 Sierra Leone Leone
1 Philippine Peso = 11.08634 Somali Shilling
1 Philippine Peso = 435.85326 Sao Tome Dobra
1 Philippine Peso = 0.17678 El Salvador Colon
1 Philippine Peso = 10.43737 Syrian Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 0.26014 Swaziland Lilageni
1 Philippine Peso = 0.6897 Thai Baht
1 Philippine Peso = 0.04917 Tunisian Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.04647 Tongan paʻanga
1 Philippine Peso = 0.0711 Turkish Lira
1 Philippine Peso = 0.13537 Trinidad Tobago Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.61011 Taiwan Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 45.17633 Tanzanian Shilling
1 Philippine Peso = 0.53223 Ukraine Hryvnia
1 Philippine Peso = 72.78071 Ugandan Shilling
1 Philippine Peso = 0.02027 United States Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.57377 Uruguayan New Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 77.82732 Uzbekistan Sum
1 Philippine Peso = 0.20216 Venezuelan Bolivar
1 Philippine Peso = 459.54601 Vietnam Dong
1 Philippine Peso = 2.18241 Vanuatu Vatu
1 Philippine Peso = 0.05201 Samoa Tala
1 Philippine Peso = 11.77483 CFA Franc (BEAC)
1 Philippine Peso = 0.05472 East Caribbean Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 11.82205 CFA Franc (BCEAO)
1 Philippine Peso = 2.13174 Pacific Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 5.06546 Yemen Riyal
1 Philippine Peso = 0.25921 South African Rand
1 Philippine Peso = 105.17835 Zambian Kwacha
1 Philippine Peso = 7.33482 Zimbabwe dollar

Milking money from a mental malady

Tucked away and hidden among warehouses, garages and factories, as if the accidental anonymity were intended, the school catering to society’s subterraneans made good money milked from an unfortunate population with both intellectual and mental health concerns. 

In a manner of speaking, both parents and students were trapped by unfortunate circumstance and were forced into a compromise. That ugly reality on one end of fate’s darkest spectrum was unfortunately matched by the uglier reality of predatory greed.

Of its population of a less than a hundred, over three-quarters were transferees from either first or second choice branded and pedigreed learning institutions. This third, perhaps even fourth choice, was not in the same league --  a decision its operators were content with. Like other businesses enjoying fat tax perks and largely cash-based revenues, underneath the veneer and well-behind the woodwork, the money - milking enterprise was simply a business for profit operation.

But unlike others, it offered something better schools did not. Approximately ten percent, perhaps even higher, of its population were afflicted with mental health concerns. 

Lurking at the fringes and escaping the scrutiny of the Commission on Higher Education (CHED), the school took in students afflicted with issues that ranged from simple attention deficit disorders, to chronic mental depression, to clinically diagnosed and documented autism despite the blatant absence of qualified teaching and professional on-site counseling personnel. 

Here is a question of ethics where an educational enterprise sucks up good money and yet, from square one, with full knowledge of the special requisites of afflicted students, offers an expensive package that is not only inadequate to address special needs, but could well endanger students and lead to suicidal consequences. 

After all, deep and manic depression and suicidal tendencies induced by alienation and a competitive classroom environment can aggravate delicate conditions. More so can constant failing grades from a teaching staff ill-equipped to address special needs.

The question of ethics is deeply profound and far-reaching. The attraction of easy money milked from parents-in-denial and vulnerable enough to shell out humongous amounts founds the debate.

In one corner the stinging societal stigma associated with mental health remains a reality some parents are unwilling to address. For those parents, and their afflicted children, all desperate and condemned by circumstance, options are limited. Around the bend lurks enterprising predators offering quick solutions. Such opportunistic predation arrayed against the parental inability to accept ugly truths and the absence of choices create social abuses. 

These, surprisingly, are not uncommon. They are simply spoken of in whispers.

Openly and quite candidly discussed by mental health advocate and author Edwin Francis in his excellent book “Swung by a Pendulum” (Francis, 2016) perhaps the most common albeit the least confronted among the mental health issues -- bipolarism -- is presented as a dark reality that cries out and demands our attention. 

Even as Francis blows the lid on a hidden crisis he is heartwarming and sensitive to those afflicted. He notes that it starts among the young and either falls unnoticed or is openly denied. Allow us, however, to sound an alarm. As in our example of a school that profits from it, there are insidious predators preying on well-intentioned families.

Inspired by Francis’s advocacy allow us to cast off a continuing series by first presenting how such vulnerabilities expose victims to being preyed upon where family earnings are sucked and siphoned dry from a manic depressive malady.

That we employed as an introduction the educational environment to depict denial against avaricious predation is deliberate. The data Francis exposes in his book substantiates our initiative. On a global scale, a 2012 treatise on the disorder identified as much as 2.5 percent as afflicted. 

Let’s bring those numbers into the classroom. In a randomly picked average-sized college class the ratio translates to one or two condemned with mental afflictions. Because mental depression, bipolarity and even substance abuse need not be directly linked, all three within a single roll call is a distinct probability. After all, depression is the second most prevalent globally while bipolarity ranks sixth. Imagine the severity of separate and several mental afflictions within an average class of students.

Now let’s zero-in on the youth where the bipolarity demographics compel us to focus. 

Francis writes that over 2.5 million Filipinos are likely to be victims in varying degrees of mental disorder and, among the most vulnerable ages, the 15 to 44 year old grouping is perhaps the most vulnerable. 

Again, crunch out the numbers. That’s the age group that should be the most productive. Unfortunately, within that majority, approximately 50 percent  are within the collegiate system. Where a school’s business model preys on such students despite their inadequacies, as in our school example, the population likely afflicted represents a victimized population exponentially larger than both the global or Philippine averages that Francis estimates.

Obviously for the avaricious and predatory Ferengi, a niche market exists where its unfortunate vulnerabilities are offered up as shameless business opportunities. 
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