April 22, 2018, 3:18 am
Facebook iconTwitter iconYouTube iconGoogle+ icon
1 Philippine Peso = 0.07053 UAE Dirham
1 Philippine Peso = 1.99923 Albanian Lek
1 Philippine Peso = 0.03418 Neth Antilles Guilder
1 Philippine Peso = 0.38677 Argentine Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 0.02467 Australian Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.03418 Aruba Florin
1 Philippine Peso = 0.03841 Barbados Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 1.59228 Bangladesh Taka
1 Philippine Peso = 0.03034 Bulgarian Lev
1 Philippine Peso = 0.00724 Bahraini Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 33.62742 Burundi Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 0.0192 Bermuda Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.02503 Brunei Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.13175 Bolivian Boliviano
1 Philippine Peso = 0.06526 Brazilian Real
1 Philippine Peso = 0.0192 Bahamian Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 1.26032 Bhutan Ngultrum
1 Philippine Peso = 0.18403 Botswana Pula
1 Philippine Peso = 384.48243 Belarus Ruble
1 Philippine Peso = 0.03837 Belize Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.02421 Canadian Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01858 Swiss Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 11.41406 Chilean Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 0.12052 Chinese Yuan
1 Philippine Peso = 52.12791 Colombian Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 10.7778 Costa Rica Colon
1 Philippine Peso = 0.0192 Cuban Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 1.71039 Cape Verde Escudo
1 Philippine Peso = 0.39282 Czech Koruna
1 Philippine Peso = 3.39601 Djibouti Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 0.11551 Danish Krone
1 Philippine Peso = 0.94891 Dominican Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 2.1798 Algerian Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.24262 Estonian Kroon
1 Philippine Peso = 0.33916 Egyptian Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 0.52276 Ethiopian Birr
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01551 Euro
1 Philippine Peso = 0.03865 Fiji Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01348 Falkland Islands Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01349 British Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 0.08525 Ghanaian Cedi
1 Philippine Peso = 0.89975 Gambian Dalasi
1 Philippine Peso = 172.80584 Guinea Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 0.14089 Guatemala Quetzal
1 Philippine Peso = 3.95007 Guyana Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.15072 Hong Kong Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.45249 Honduras Lempira
1 Philippine Peso = 0.11491 Croatian Kuna
1 Philippine Peso = 1.24505 Haiti Gourde
1 Philippine Peso = 4.8093 Hungarian Forint
1 Philippine Peso = 264.60534 Indonesian Rupiah
1 Philippine Peso = 0.06739 Israeli Shekel
1 Philippine Peso = 1.26727 Indian Rupee
1 Philippine Peso = 22.73862 Iraqi Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 806.60649 Iran Rial
1 Philippine Peso = 1.91031 Iceland Krona
1 Philippine Peso = 2.37565 Jamaican Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01361 Jordanian Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 2.06171 Japanese Yen
1 Philippine Peso = 1.92145 Kenyan Shilling
1 Philippine Peso = 1.32194 Kyrgyzstan Som
1 Philippine Peso = 76.97331 Cambodia Riel
1 Philippine Peso = 7.61206 Comoros Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 17.28442 North Korean Won
1 Philippine Peso = 20.40042 Korean Won
1 Philippine Peso = 0.00575 Kuwaiti Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01575 Cayman Islands Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 6.25043 Kazakhstan Tenge
1 Philippine Peso = 158.93989 Lao Kip
1 Philippine Peso = 28.9034 Lebanese Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 2.99693 Sri Lanka Rupee
1 Philippine Peso = 2.50451 Liberian Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.22892 Lesotho Loti
1 Philippine Peso = 0.05855 Lithuanian Lita
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01192 Latvian Lat
1 Philippine Peso = 0.02543 Libyan Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.17577 Moroccan Dirham
1 Philippine Peso = 0.31452 Moldovan Leu
1 Philippine Peso = 0.94968 Macedonian Denar
1 Philippine Peso = 25.52333 Myanmar Kyat
1 Philippine Peso = 45.86134 Mongolian Tugrik
1 Philippine Peso = 0.15521 Macau Pataca
1 Philippine Peso = 6.76013 Mauritania Ougulya
1 Philippine Peso = 0.64144 Mauritius Rupee
1 Philippine Peso = 0.29902 Maldives Rufiyaa
1 Philippine Peso = 13.70175 Malawi Kwacha
1 Philippine Peso = 0.35007 Mexican Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 0.07459 Malaysian Ringgit
1 Philippine Peso = 0.22915 Namibian Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 6.87536 Nigerian Naira
1 Philippine Peso = 0.59554 Nicaragua Cordoba
1 Philippine Peso = 0.14884 Norwegian Krone
1 Philippine Peso = 2.01652 Nepalese Rupee
1 Philippine Peso = 0.02629 New Zealand Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.00739 Omani Rial
1 Philippine Peso = 0.0192 Panama Balboa
1 Philippine Peso = 0.06176 Peruvian Nuevo Sol
1 Philippine Peso = 0.06241 Papua New Guinea Kina
1 Philippine Peso = 1 Philippine Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 2.21836 Pakistani Rupee
1 Philippine Peso = 0.06459 Polish Zloty
1 Philippine Peso = 106.04187 Paraguayan Guarani
1 Philippine Peso = 0.0699 Qatar Rial
1 Philippine Peso = 0.07223 Romanian New Leu
1 Philippine Peso = 1.16816 Russian Rouble
1 Philippine Peso = 16.22066 Rwanda Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 0.07202 Saudi Arabian Riyal
1 Philippine Peso = 0.14768 Solomon Islands Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.25792 Seychelles Rupee
1 Philippine Peso = 0.34667 Sudanese Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 0.161 Swedish Krona
1 Philippine Peso = 0.02513 Singapore Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01349 St Helena Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 0.42646 Slovak Koruna
1 Philippine Peso = 146.53351 Sierra Leone Leone
1 Philippine Peso = 10.79316 Somali Shilling
1 Philippine Peso = 380.06338 Sao Tome Dobra
1 Philippine Peso = 0.16804 El Salvador Colon
1 Philippine Peso = 9.89015 Syrian Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 0.22917 Swaziland Lilageni
1 Philippine Peso = 0.599 Thai Baht
1 Philippine Peso = 0.04602 Tunisian Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.04292 Tongan paʻanga
1 Philippine Peso = 0.07736 Turkish Lira
1 Philippine Peso = 0.12961 Trinidad Tobago Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.56365 Taiwan Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 43.7488 Tanzanian Shilling
1 Philippine Peso = 0.50259 Ukraine Hryvnia
1 Philippine Peso = 70.84694 Ugandan Shilling
1 Philippine Peso = 0.0192 United States Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.54158 Uruguayan New Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 154.65719 Uzbekistan Sum
1 Philippine Peso = 1139.831 Venezuelan Bolivar
1 Philippine Peso = 437.43038 Vietnam Dong
1 Philippine Peso = 2.00538 Vanuatu Vatu
1 Philippine Peso = 0.04922 Samoa Tala
1 Philippine Peso = 10.16881 CFA Franc (BEAC)
1 Philippine Peso = 0.05185 East Caribbean Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 10.16881 CFA Franc (BCEAO)
1 Philippine Peso = 1.83983 Pacific Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 4.79931 Yemen Riyal
1 Philippine Peso = 0.2292 South African Rand
1 Philippine Peso = 99.66391 Zambian Kwacha
1 Philippine Peso = 6.95026 Zimbabwe dollar

March of Mundane, Mysterious

MANILA, 10 March 1943 (Domei) – Utilizing the theory of crop rotation to the fullest, the Nippon Military Administration in the Philippines has specified what crops to be planted by cotton growers during the interval between the cotton seasons now that the first year’s cotton crops, under the Philippines cotton cultivation plan have been harvested. [http://eresources.nlb.gov.sg/newspapers/Digitised/Article/syonantimes19430312-1.2.32]

Mundane, yes. But wasn’t that the point? The fascist Japanese wanted the Filipinos to accept the enemy occupation of Rizal’s native land as the new normal. Hirohito’s henchmen obsessed that Rizal’s countrymen should and would accept their exploitation by the Oriental Hitlerites as the slot reserved for the Pearl of the Orient in Tokyo’s imperialist blueprint. In fact, Premier and General Hideki Tojo’s speech to the Diet, “promising independence to Burma within this year and to the Philippines in the near future...constitutes further evidence that Nippon is creating and establishing the Co-Prosperity Sphere while fighting.” [“Co-Prosperity Sphere Plan ‘Superior To Atlantic Charter,” Syonan Shimbun, 12 March 1943, Page 2; http://eresources.nlb.gov.sg/newspapers/Digitised/Article/syonantimes19430312-1.2.19]

Meanwhile, in Hamburg, the circus elephants, Kiri and Many, were used to clear wreckage after bombing raids. Were these animals “patriots” of Germany? Nazis? Prisoners of war? Forced labor? [Weird War Two, the eccentric encyclopedia published by the UK Imperial War Museums]

The Second World War had its share of mysteries: the ghost warplane of Pearl Harbor, “Foo Fighters,” and the Russian “Amber Room” that was stolen by the Nazis, among others. Are these phenomena on the same level as the Ubaid Lizardmen, Phaistos disk, or Roman dodecahedron? We wonder.

Ordinary Americans also wondered: Why wasn’t the United States more prepared for war? Response by the American First Lady: “Because after the last war we made up our minds that we were never going to have another war. We taught our children at home and on the college campuses that war never settled affairs of state to anyone’s satisfaction. We thoroughly convinced our young people of this, and they in turn convinced a great part of the country that we would never again have a period of war. Therefore, as we watched the rest of the world go to war, we simply insisted that staying at peace was something which we decided for ourselves and which had no relationship to the decisions of the rest of the world. Taking this attitude and feeling so secure, we quite naturally sent to Congress people who held the same opinion, and we upheld them in these opinions and would listen to no others.” [E. Roosevelt, Ladies’ Home Journal, Volume 59, March 1942; https://www2.gwu.edu/~erpapers/iyam/iyam_1942_03.cfm]

Humdrum, right? How about special footwear: Overshoes were designed for Special Operations Executive agents in Southeast Asia “intended to disguise footprints to fool the Japanese into believing they belonged to a local rather than a soldier.” [https://www.iwm.org.uk/history/unbelievable-images-from-weird-war-two]

This one sounds quotidian, garden-variety, plain vanilla: March 30—PRESIDENT Garcia started this day by reading the Holy Bible, particularly the chapter on Palm Sunday. He used the Bible presented to him by Francis Cardinal Spellman on one of the latter’s recent visits to Manila.

“The President today started taking fruit juice on the seventh day of his fasting. He sipped orange juice from slices of fresh oranges for breakfast, lunch, and supper. In between meals he took water with little sugar.” [http://www.officialgazette.gov.ph/1958/03/31/official-month-in-review-march-16-march-31-1958/]

Boring is better than mass slaughter (Rape of Nanjing, Bataan Death March) or crimes against humanity, including theft of personal and private property. Hitler in 1943 created “Son derauftrag Linz” to set up an art collection for the Austrian city of Linz and at least 53 of its paintings were seized by Nazis in Occupied Europe, according to Berlin historian Hanns Christian Löhr.

Calling Indiana Jones; intrigue remains, for instance: “The Amber Room of the Catherine Palace is one of the most famous missing cultural treasures...At the beginning of the Great Patriotic War (WWII), the Nazi invaders stripped the amber panels and all the decorations from the room, taking them to the city of Konigsberg (present-day Kaliningrad). What happened to the treasure after that still remains a mystery.” [http://tass.com/society/971144]

Back in the world of the run-of-the-mill: PRESIDENT Roxas and the First Lady spent a quiet Easter. With the members of his family, the President heard the Regular Easter mass in Malacañan chapel said by Rev. Father Guese, chaplain of the Presidential Guards. Following the service, President Roxas and his family took a simple breakfast and later he went to Malacañan Park across Pasig River and played golf with his usual golf links “buddies”, including Secretary Garchitorena, Jose Yulo, Ernesto Rufino, Luis de Leon, J. Amado Araneta and others. [http://www.officialgazette.gov.ph/1948/03/01/official-month-in-review-march-1948/]

Sometimes the heart-stopping developments take place indoors. The best enigma is that of code-breaking. “In March of 1943, Ultra yielded a German code word recognized as signifying a shift to an additional (fourth) rotor within the Enigma machine itself. The blood of the men at Bletchley ran cold. Unless this move could be countered in short order, there was the grim prospect of another extended blackout on decipherment - sheer disaster at that critical juncture. Bletchley concentrated its every resource and, unbelievably, in ten days found a solution to the problem.” [Harold C. Deutsch, “The Historical Impact of Revealing The Ultra Secret”; https://www.nsa.gov/news-features/declassified-documents/cryptologic-spectrum/assets/files/ultra_secret.pdf]

Since the discipline of math and logic strikes the indolent as tedious, the world of Lara Croft: Tomb Raider beckons. German Field Marshal Erwin Rommel was alleged to have hidden stolen treasures in his area of operations. Similar to the fabled Yamashita gold. In March of 2017, the City Council gave the go-signal to treasure hunter Eliseo Cabusao Jr. to extract what he believes is the Yamashita treasure underneath the Baguio Convention Center. [http://www.sunstar.com.ph/baguio/local-news/2017/03/15/yamashita-hunt-baguio-531043]

Good luck finding those Easter eggs. The Overseas Korean Cultural Heritage Foundation estimated that 66,824 Korean national treasures were taken to Japan, but the existence of a secret list suggests there are more. [“Japan Hid Looted Korean Treasures,” http://english.chosun.com/site/data/html_dir/2014/07/29/2014072901190.html]
Rating: 
Average: 5 (1 vote)

Column of the Day

Globe’s nuisance messages

By DAHLI ASPILLERA | April 20,2018
‘Ayala, do something to stop these off-hour sales texts to my mobile!’

Opinion of the Day

Dinapigue on my mind

By JOSE BAYANI BAYLON | April 20, 2018
‘When that happens Dinapigue will be distant no more. Because when opportunities beckon, distance no longer becomes a hindrance.’