June 22, 2018, 11:14 am
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1 Philippine Peso = 0.06897 UAE Dirham
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1 Philippine Peso = 0.52113 Argentine Peso
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1 Philippine Peso = 0.12883 Bolivian Boliviano
1 Philippine Peso = 0.07009 Brazilian Real
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01878 Bahamian Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 1.277 Bhutan Ngultrum
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1 Philippine Peso = 0.02494 Canadian Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01868 Swiss Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 12.01146 Chilean Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 0.12169 Chinese Yuan
1 Philippine Peso = 54.86948 Colombian Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 10.59718 Costa Rica Colon
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01878 Cuban Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 1.78854 Cape Verde Escudo
1 Philippine Peso = 0.41869 Czech Koruna
1 Philippine Peso = 3.33333 Djibouti Franc
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1 Philippine Peso = 0.93052 Dominican Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 2.20053 Algerian Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.25367 Estonian Kroon
1 Philippine Peso = 0.33502 Egyptian Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 0.51117 Ethiopian Birr
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01621 Euro
1 Philippine Peso = 0.03897 Fiji Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01426 Falkland Islands Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01425 British Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 0.08833 Ghanaian Cedi
1 Philippine Peso = 0.87962 Gambian Dalasi
1 Philippine Peso = 169.05164 Guinea Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 0.14052 Guatemala Quetzal
1 Philippine Peso = 3.88526 Guyana Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.14739 Hong Kong Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.44866 Honduras Lempira
1 Philippine Peso = 0.1197 Croatian Kuna
1 Philippine Peso = 1.23812 Haiti Gourde
1 Philippine Peso = 5.22103 Hungarian Forint
1 Philippine Peso = 261.46479 Indonesian Rupiah
1 Philippine Peso = 0.06819 Israeli Shekel
1 Philippine Peso = 1.27817 Indian Rupee
1 Philippine Peso = 22.23474 Iraqi Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 796.99531 Iran Rial
1 Philippine Peso = 2.05333 Iceland Krona
1 Philippine Peso = 2.4507 Jamaican Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01331 Jordanian Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 2.06607 Japanese Yen
1 Philippine Peso = 1.89577 Kenyan Shilling
1 Philippine Peso = 1.28255 Kyrgyzstan Som
1 Philippine Peso = 75.84601 Cambodia Riel
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1 Philippine Peso = 16.90141 North Korean Won
1 Philippine Peso = 20.8492 Korean Won
1 Philippine Peso = 0.00568 Kuwaiti Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.0154 Cayman Islands Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 6.40488 Kazakhstan Tenge
1 Philippine Peso = 157.33333 Lao Kip
1 Philippine Peso = 28.26291 Lebanese Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 3.00282 Sri Lanka Rupee
1 Philippine Peso = 2.66254 Liberian Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.2584 Lesotho Loti
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1 Philippine Peso = 0.01165 Latvian Lat
1 Philippine Peso = 0.02546 Libyan Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.17921 Moroccan Dirham
1 Philippine Peso = 0.31576 Moldovan Leu
1 Philippine Peso = 0.99324 Macedonian Denar
1 Philippine Peso = 25.69014 Myanmar Kyat
1 Philippine Peso = 45.33333 Mongolian Tugrik
1 Philippine Peso = 0.15181 Macau Pataca
1 Philippine Peso = 6.66667 Mauritania Ougulya
1 Philippine Peso = 0.65765 Mauritius Rupee
1 Philippine Peso = 0.29239 Maldives Rufiyaa
1 Philippine Peso = 13.39812 Malawi Kwacha
1 Philippine Peso = 0.3853 Mexican Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 0.07515 Malaysian Ringgit
1 Philippine Peso = 0.25797 Namibian Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 6.74178 Nigerian Naira
1 Philippine Peso = 0.59151 Nicaragua Cordoba
1 Philippine Peso = 0.15379 Norwegian Krone
1 Philippine Peso = 2.0385 Nepalese Rupee
1 Philippine Peso = 0.0272 New Zealand Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.00723 Omani Rial
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01878 Panama Balboa
1 Philippine Peso = 0.06164 Peruvian Nuevo Sol
1 Philippine Peso = 0.06142 Papua New Guinea Kina
1 Philippine Peso = 1 Philippine Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 2.28545 Pakistani Rupee
1 Philippine Peso = 0.06993 Polish Zloty
1 Philippine Peso = 106.70047 Paraguayan Guarani
1 Philippine Peso = 0.06835 Qatar Rial
1 Philippine Peso = 0.07565 Romanian New Leu
1 Philippine Peso = 1.1966 Russian Rouble
1 Philippine Peso = 15.95174 Rwanda Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 0.07042 Saudi Arabian Riyal
1 Philippine Peso = 0.14841 Solomon Islands Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.25277 Seychelles Rupee
1 Philippine Peso = 0.33719 Sudanese Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 0.16718 Swedish Krona
1 Philippine Peso = 0.02548 Singapore Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01426 St Helena Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 0.41701 Slovak Koruna
1 Philippine Peso = 149.29577 Sierra Leone Leone
1 Philippine Peso = 10.57277 Somali Shilling
1 Philippine Peso = 397.4216 Sao Tome Dobra
1 Philippine Peso = 0.16432 El Salvador Colon
1 Philippine Peso = 9.67099 Syrian Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 0.25817 Swaziland Lilageni
1 Philippine Peso = 0.61446 Thai Baht
1 Philippine Peso = 0.04845 Tunisian Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.04326 Tongan paʻanga
1 Philippine Peso = 0.08905 Turkish Lira
1 Philippine Peso = 0.12487 Trinidad Tobago Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.56648 Taiwan Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 42.59155 Tanzanian Shilling
1 Philippine Peso = 0.49596 Ukraine Hryvnia
1 Philippine Peso = 72.33803 Ugandan Shilling
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01878 United States Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.59211 Uruguayan New Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 147.69953 Uzbekistan Sum
1 Philippine Peso = 1498.59155 Venezuelan Bolivar
1 Philippine Peso = 429.12676 Vietnam Dong
1 Philippine Peso = 2.02911 Vanuatu Vatu
1 Philippine Peso = 0.04869 Samoa Tala
1 Philippine Peso = 10.62592 CFA Franc (BEAC)
1 Philippine Peso = 0.0507 East Caribbean Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 10.62592 CFA Franc (BCEAO)
1 Philippine Peso = 1.92432 Pacific Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 4.69202 Yemen Riyal
1 Philippine Peso = 0.25823 South African Rand
1 Philippine Peso = 97.4554 Zambian Kwacha
1 Philippine Peso = 6.79624 Zimbabwe dollar

Knowledge of the Un-holy

A LACK of national grit and determination is due to defects in our educational system. For, instead of inculcating in the youth a lively sense of their German nationality, the aim of the educational system is to make the youth prostrate themselves in homage to the idea, as if the idea were an idol.”

“The education which makes them the devotees of such abstract notions as ‘Democracy’, ‘International Socialism’, ‘Pacifism’, etc., is so hard-and-fast and exclusive and, operating as it does from within outwards, is so purely subjective that in forming their general picture of outside life as a whole they are fundamentally influenced by these A PRIORI notions.” – Adolf Hitler

That passage should feed the dark moods of the Japanese officials who approved the use of “Mein Kampf,” Hitler’s autobiography and Nazi manifesto, as “teaching material” last year. Abe Shinzo’s Cabinet had also okayed Emperor Meiji’s 1890 Imperial Rescript on Education as “teaching material” in schools. “According to many historians, the Rescript, which focuses on patriotism and loyalty to the Japanese Emperor, was one of the primary sources promoting obedience and moral certitude that helped militarism to grow in Japan.” [https://www.rt.com/news/384877-hitlers-mein-kampf-returns-to-japan-school/]

Kinda ironic given that Hitler wrote: “Japanese development has been due to Aryan influence...This opinion is very strongly supported by the fact that the ancient civilization of Japan actually became fossilized and petrified. Such a process of senility can happen only if a people loses the racial cell which originally had been creative or if the outside influence should be withdrawn after having awakened and maintained the first cultural developments in that region. If it be shown that a people owes the fundamental elements of its culture to foreign races, assimilating and elaborating such elements, and if subsequently that culture becomes fossilized whenever the external influence ceases, then such a race may be called the depository but never the creator of a culture.”

We wonder how such Hitlerian views will be taught to Japanese students by Japanese teachers. More irony:

“But the fact remains that discrimination against individuals of Japanese descent and their spouses continued to take place when such discrimination posed no direct threat to German-Japanese relations...Nazi authorities conducted substantial research on racial and family backgrounds of the victims in order to determine the diplomatic significance of every single case under examination. An enormous amount of paperwork involved in the case studies alone attests to the Nazis’ determination to exalt the ‘Aryan race’ and to protect it from ‘pollution’ by ‘the Japanese race.’ In sum, racial ideology was such a preeminent pillar of the Nazi regime that the Nazis refused to abandon their racism toward the Japanese, no matter how illogical and inconvenient it was to Germany’s relations with Japan.” [Harumi Shidehara Furuya, “Nazi Racism Toward the Japanese: Ideology vs. Realpolitik,” NOAG 157–158 (1995) 17–75]

Even more ironic, the official website of the Philippines (which suffered greatly at the hands of the imperialist Japanese: Bataan Death March, Rape of Manila, etc.) has a positive spin on the Fascist intervention: “Japanese educational policies were embodied in Military Order No. 2 in 1942. The Philippine Executive Commission established the Commission of Education, Health and Public Welfare and schools were reopened in June 1942. On October 14, 1943, the Japanese–sponsored Republic created the Ministry of Education. Under the Japanese regime, the teaching of Tagalog, Philippine History, and Character Education was reserved for Filipinos. Love for work and dignity of labor was emphasized. On February 27, 1945, the Department of Instruction was made part of the Department of Public Instruction.” [http://www.deped.gov.ph/history]

Be that as it may, we notice other historical bits, trends and phenomena in the educational system:

(1) “In January, 1945, the Central Federation of Social Education Groups (Chuo Kyoka Dantai Rengokai) was dissolved and the Greater Japan Congress for Instruction in Patriotism (Dai Nippon Kyoka Hokokukai) was organized through combining the leading social education associations with the Minister of Education as president to further intensify the campaign to promote the national spirit.” [Japan Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology website]

(2) Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe and his First Lady had been embroiled in a controversy with a Moritomo Gakuen-run elementary school in Osaka Prefecture.

(3) “The Imperial Rescript of Education or Kyōiku-chokugo (1890) was drafted during the time of Mori Arinori (1847-1889) who became the First Minister of Education in 1885. This gave great moral force to the educational system and promoted the rise of militarism and ultra-militarism.” [Ian Gibson, “Nationalistic Tendencies and Tensions within the Japanese Educational System,” Ritsumeikan Annual Review of International Studies, 2011, Vol. 10, pp. 95-119]

(4) “The Chiran Peace Museum for Kamikaze Pilots is a popular tourist attraction in Kagoshima Prefecture. The village was made up an image the Holy Land of the Kamikaze Special Attack Corps. Obviously, the title is a lack of reflection on the Japanese assailant. Especially, the Chiran Peace Museum for Kamikaze Pilots is settled an exhibition as a time zone of 1945 spring (1945.3.26~7.19). They did not watch the Pacific War the inside of the current of Fifteen Years War. They also did not reflect that they drove out the young generation into death and did not make a definite promise to repeat cruel history. What they say the peace is Japanese’s characteristic peace as a Galapagos Syndrome. It is not a world universal permanent peace. This indeed can tell a miseducation of war and peace.” [Kyoonseop Park, “Discourse on the Kamikaze Special Attack Corps and the Chiran Peace Museum for Kamikaze Pilots – The Miseducation on the War and Peace in Japan,” The Japanese Modern Association of Korea open access journal, 2015, No. 49, pp. 293–310]

(5) “The Abe cabinet is being credited, or blamed depending on the perspective, with the introduction of ‘nationalistic’ elements in moral education...Kokoro no Nooto, heavily criticized and labeled as a ‘failure’ by many, is an example of the Ministry’s failure to secure the required legal authority to see through their educational policies. The recent decision to make moral education an academic course is a new attempt at securing control over Japanese teachers.” [Kristoffer Hornburg Bolton, Moral Education in Japan: The Coming of a New Dawn, Abe’s New Moral Education, Master’s Thesis in Modern Japan, Department of Culture Studies and Oriental Languages, Universitetet I Oslo, Fall 2015]

Thus, in this education month of June, we recall Renato Constantino having written correctly: “Education is a vital weapon of a people.” [The Mis-education of the Filipino, Journal of Contemporary Asia, 30:3, 428-444]
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