May 26, 2017, 9:41 am
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1 Philippine Peso = 0.07381 UAE Dirham
1 Philippine Peso = 2.39851 Albanian Lek
1 Philippine Peso = 0.03597 Neth Antilles Guilder
1 Philippine Peso = 0.32504 Argentine Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 0.02683 Australian Dollar
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1 Philippine Peso = 0.0201 Bermuda Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.02784 Brunei Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.13867 Bolivian Boliviano
1 Philippine Peso = 0.06563 Brazilian Real
1 Philippine Peso = 0.0201 Bahamian Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 1.30125 Bhutan Ngultrum
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1 Philippine Peso = 0.04015 Belize Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.0271 Canadian Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01953 Swiss Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 13.47267 Chilean Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 0.13847 Chinese Yuan
1 Philippine Peso = 58.35812 Colombian Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 11.51125 Costa Rica Colon
1 Philippine Peso = 0.0201 Cuban Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 1.96925 Cape Verde Escudo
1 Philippine Peso = 0.47339 Czech Koruna
1 Philippine Peso = 3.57074 Djibouti Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 0.13296 Danish Krone
1 Philippine Peso = 0.94574 Dominican Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 2.17205 Algerian Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.27938 Estonian Kroon
1 Philippine Peso = 0.36314 Egyptian Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 0.46021 Ethiopian Birr
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01786 Euro
1 Philippine Peso = 0.0421 Fiji Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01545 Falkland Islands Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01546 British Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 0.08669 Ghanaian Cedi
1 Philippine Peso = 0.90334 Gambian Dalasi
1 Philippine Peso = 181.20981 Guinea Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 0.14748 Guatemala Quetzal
1 Philippine Peso = 4.11013 Guyana Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.15644 Hong Kong Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.47082 Honduras Lempira
1 Philippine Peso = 0.13208 Croatian Kuna
1 Philippine Peso = 1.33903 Haiti Gourde
1 Philippine Peso = 5.50744 Hungarian Forint
1 Philippine Peso = 267.16239 Indonesian Rupiah
1 Philippine Peso = 0.0719 Israeli Shekel
1 Philippine Peso = 1.29803 Indian Rupee
1 Philippine Peso = 23.73392 Iraqi Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 651.98958 Iran Rial
1 Philippine Peso = 2.0008 Iceland Krona
1 Philippine Peso = 2.60008 Jamaican Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01424 Jordanian Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 2.23286 Japanese Yen
1 Philippine Peso = 2.07094 Kenyan Shilling
1 Philippine Peso = 1.36441 Kyrgyzstan Som
1 Philippine Peso = 81.2902 Cambodia Riel
1 Philippine Peso = 9.04341 Comoros Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 18.08682 North Korean Won
1 Philippine Peso = 22.44775 Korean Won
1 Philippine Peso = 0.00609 Kuwaiti Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01648 Cayman Islands Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 6.24598 Kazakhstan Tenge
1 Philippine Peso = 164.32878 Lao Kip
1 Philippine Peso = 30.27532 Lebanese Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 3.06873 Sri Lanka Rupee
1 Philippine Peso = 1.84887 Liberian Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.26588 Lesotho Loti
1 Philippine Peso = 0.06127 Lithuanian Lita
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01247 Latvian Lat
1 Philippine Peso = 0.02803 Libyan Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.19542 Moroccan Dirham
1 Philippine Peso = 0.36586 Moldovan Leu
1 Philippine Peso = 1.09586 Macedonian Denar
1 Philippine Peso = 27.49196 Myanmar Kyat
1 Philippine Peso = 48.43248 Mongolian Tugrik
1 Philippine Peso = 0.16115 Macau Pataca
1 Philippine Peso = 7.19453 Mauritania Ougulya
1 Philippine Peso = 0.69695 Mauritius Rupee
1 Philippine Peso = 0.3115 Maldives Rufiyaa
1 Philippine Peso = 14.4168 Malawi Kwacha
1 Philippine Peso = 0.37541 Mexican Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 0.08626 Malaysian Ringgit
1 Philippine Peso = 0.26598 Namibian Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 6.33039 Nigerian Naira
1 Philippine Peso = 0.59385 Nicaragua Cordoba
1 Philippine Peso = 0.16751 Norwegian Krone
1 Philippine Peso = 2.07195 Nepalese Rupee
1 Philippine Peso = 0.02866 New Zealand Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.00773 Omani Rial
1 Philippine Peso = 0.0201 Panama Balboa
1 Philippine Peso = 0.06572 Peruvian Nuevo Sol
1 Philippine Peso = 0.06587 Papua New Guinea Kina
1 Philippine Peso = 1 Philippine Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 2.10309 Pakistani Rupee
1 Philippine Peso = 0.07495 Polish Zloty
1 Philippine Peso = 111.9996 Paraguayan Guarani
1 Philippine Peso = 0.07317 Qatar Rial
1 Philippine Peso = 0.0813 Romanian New Leu
1 Philippine Peso = 1.13651 Russian Rouble
1 Philippine Peso = 16.46403 Rwanda Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 0.07535 Saudi Arabian Riyal
1 Philippine Peso = 0.15881 Solomon Islands Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.26967 Seychelles Rupee
1 Philippine Peso = 0.13384 Sudanese Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 0.17452 Swedish Krona
1 Philippine Peso = 0.02785 Singapore Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01546 St Helena Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 0.44626 Slovak Koruna
1 Philippine Peso = 149.31673 Sierra Leone Leone
1 Philippine Peso = 11.03296 Somali Shilling
1 Philippine Peso = 437.5784 Sao Tome Dobra
1 Philippine Peso = 0.17528 El Salvador Colon
1 Philippine Peso = 10.34928 Syrian Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 0.26605 Swaziland Lilageni
1 Philippine Peso = 0.69031 Thai Baht
1 Philippine Peso = 0.04822 Tunisian Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.04643 Tongan paʻanga
1 Philippine Peso = 0.0716 Turkish Lira
1 Philippine Peso = 0.13463 Trinidad Tobago Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.60344 Taiwan Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 44.81511 Tanzanian Shilling
1 Philippine Peso = 0.52904 Ukraine Hryvnia
1 Philippine Peso = 72.62862 Ugandan Shilling
1 Philippine Peso = 0.0201 United States Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.56692 Uruguayan New Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 76.36656 Uzbekistan Sum
1 Philippine Peso = 0.20045 Venezuelan Bolivar
1 Philippine Peso = 454.6624 Vietnam Dong
1 Philippine Peso = 2.15394 Vanuatu Vatu
1 Philippine Peso = 0.05199 Samoa Tala
1 Philippine Peso = 11.70539 CFA Franc (BEAC)
1 Philippine Peso = 0.05426 East Caribbean Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 11.75181 CFA Franc (BCEAO)
1 Philippine Peso = 2.11917 Pacific Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 5.02271 Yemen Riyal
1 Philippine Peso = 0.2661 South African Rand
1 Philippine Peso = 104.2906 Zambian Kwacha
1 Philippine Peso = 7.27291 Zimbabwe dollar

Killing watersheds, killing life

The simplest, most graphic and perhaps the most eloquent argument against open pit mining is found, not in the voluminous academic dissertations where arguments encompass the spectrum from bludgeoned biodiversity and ravaged ecosystems to the abuse of rights and ancestral domain and the brazen murder of their advocates. It is in a simple satellite photograph of an ongoing mining operation. 

Nothing can be uglier and disturbing. Nothing can be more gruesome and scarier. Indeed nothing shocks as much as a gaping open wound inflicted on Mother Nature, especially when we view the environment under those endearing terms rather than the utilitarian perspective of mining advocates where profit and plus ultra are the principal themes highlighted by screaming exclamation marks that boldly punctuate commercialization and exploitation.

Behind these graphic images of abuse the ever-lengthening litany of criminality underlying the ugliest images are just as horrific. They paint a picture in the darkest and bloodiest tones over an industry that’s profited from the vulnerability and misery of the weakest, the poorest and the most exploited. 

From the violent militarization of peaceful, idyllic and innocent communities to the toxic siltation of farmlands and fishing waters, to recklessly mining atop delicate fault lines and the contamination of ground waters and aquifers that nourish communities, to both the continuing maltreatment and the massacres and heinous killings of indigenous families -- these crimes are shellacked over by questionable economics that says we must pay these prices if we want employment and industrial development.

The sarcasm extends to smart-ass arguments that there will be no cellphones, cars and computers if mining had not existed. There will also be no bullets and bombs. No guns, no gold and no goons - the latter three, essential political weapons wielded by those who now decide the fate of a righteous advocacy.

It is a question of power and money. Unfortunately, money blindsides. The glitter of gold and the sheen of chrome, copper and nickel cast such blinding glares enough to obscure both the eyesight of political animals and the intellect a scant inch behind a politician’s small skull. To complete the hypnotic effect, the incessant pinging of cash registers adds another dimension to monetary temptations that back-burner what are essential.

To be fair, allow us to view what mining’s advocates and beneficiaries see in the immediate vicinity of their political reality as they chorus and refrain economic development while secretly horse-trading away behind closed doors and executive sessions our future.

What are the economic upsides that we should be paying these high prices for the development and employment miners promise?

GDP from mining as of January 2017 was P15 billion. Compare that to agricultural GDP of P174.56 billion. Given that total GDP was $292.45 billion, between an industry that desolates and one that nourishes, agriculture obviously leads to greater economic productivity where returns to capital are higher. Moreover, not only is mining a poor GDP contributor, it ravages agricultural areas which contribute to GDP in exponentially higher degrees.

Mining’s relative contribution to employment is worse. At 0.60 percent or about 236,400 low paying jobs annually, mining’s contribution to equitable and inclusive development relative to its destructive costs, its high capitalization and the fact that its fat profits benefit economies other than ours makes it an altogether bad proposition.

The foregoing are important. More for an economy as vulnerable as ours is and an environment exponentially more fragile and constantly at risk. The differences are stark, almost an issue of black over white, good versus evil, and ultimately, right versus wrong.  More so critical when we consider the millions spent by clandestine interests both as lobby money to deny a good person a good endeavor, and the hidden public relations funding to discredit a qualified public official known for equal amounts of passion, drive, zeal, righteousness and honesty brimming in amounts alien and never-before seen at the Department of the Environment and Natural Resources (DENR).

These are actually understatements to describe DENR Secretary Regina Paz L. Lopez when we array what she brings to the DENR against what’s long infested it. As she would probably have it however, our focus is not on her personality but on her programs and her incredible and novel economic paradigm that should forever remain supported and impassioned by righteous indignation as dark forces continue to vilify both advocate and advocacy as they desperately attempt to perpetuate and inflict on both the economy and the environment gaping ulcers on once pristine earth.

Take the $5.9 billion proposal of one politically influential mining conglomerate to inflict on one of the most pristine areas of our endangered planet a gaping cavity carved over our geographical food basket that will the biggest, deepest and most destructive - a hole so wide it dwarfs several football fields.

Natural watersheds underlie the core of Lopez’s exemplary model of economic development, poverty alleviation and genuine inclusive growth. Hers is not the mining model whose $5.9 billion, should these be optionally invested in educational, medical, or even high-value crop communities might benefit Filipinos a thousand times over the profits earned through domestic taxes, employment of disenfranchised farmers and fisherfolk, and the offshore income earned by foreigners when raw ore is exported. 

Go ahead recompute the GDP contribution arithmetic. Lopez’s area development paradigm, which she presented before a decidedly partisan entity with no other gene than the political absent of DNA that produces the brain and the heart and, in its place, growing instead overly developed testicles and gall, takes us through similar arguments mining companies spin to justify their operations. They talk of employment, poverty, welfare and domestic economics. Skillfully, Lopez founds hers on the same albeit with a slew of other factors that focus primarily on protecting the earth’s watersheds thus catalyzing poverty eradication ab initio rather than as an accident of Adam Smith’s invisible hand.

Captioned under Lopez’s own “Killing watersheds, killing life” her advocacy for watersheds should be ours as well.
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Column of the Day

Sad InfinItems

By DAHLI ASPILLERA | May 26,2017
163 View(s) 0 Comment(s)
‘Week of terrorist activism. Lobby money vs Gina Lopez. Mariano, Taguiwalo--Quo vadis? Killer drivers caused 24,565 crashes years 2014-16.’

Opinion of the Day

Very dangerous

By DODY LACUNA | May 26, 2017
229 View(s) 0 Comment(s)
‘This impulsive President has failed to take the constitutionally provided calibrated moves...’