January 21, 2018, 1:12 pm
Facebook iconTwitter iconYouTube iconGoogle+ icon
1 Philippine Peso = 0.07248 UAE Dirham
1 Philippine Peso = 2.15117 Albanian Lek
1 Philippine Peso = 0.03513 Neth Antilles Guilder
1 Philippine Peso = 0.37432 Argentine Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 0.02466 Australian Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.03513 Aruba Florin
1 Philippine Peso = 0.03947 Barbados Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 1.63391 Bangladesh Taka
1 Philippine Peso = 0.0315 Bulgarian Lev
1 Philippine Peso = 0.00743 Bahraini Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 34.55654 Burundi Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01974 Bermuda Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.02619 Brunei Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.13539 Bolivian Boliviano
1 Philippine Peso = 0.06307 Brazilian Real
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01974 Bahamian Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 1.25863 Bhutan Ngultrum
1 Philippine Peso = 0.19114 Botswana Pula
1 Philippine Peso = 395.1056 Belarus Ruble
1 Philippine Peso = 0.03943 Belize Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.02465 Canadian Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01899 Swiss Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 11.98717 Chilean Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 0.12629 Chinese Yuan
1 Philippine Peso = 56.09039 Colombian Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 11.14821 Costa Rica Colon
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01974 Cuban Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 1.78074 Cape Verde Escudo
1 Philippine Peso = 0.40983 Czech Koruna
1 Philippine Peso = 3.49517 Djibouti Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 0.12017 Danish Krone
1 Philippine Peso = 0.94356 Dominican Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 2.24754 Algerian Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.25256 Estonian Kroon
1 Philippine Peso = 0.34873 Egyptian Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 0.537 Ethiopian Birr
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01614 Euro
1 Philippine Peso = 0.03952 Fiji Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01423 Falkland Islands Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01424 British Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 0.08955 Ghanaian Cedi
1 Philippine Peso = 0.95481 Gambian Dalasi
1 Philippine Peso = 177.50149 Guinea Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 0.14478 Guatemala Quetzal
1 Philippine Peso = 4.06335 Guyana Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.15424 Hong Kong Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.4645 Honduras Lempira
1 Philippine Peso = 0.11993 Croatian Kuna
1 Philippine Peso = 1.2536 Haiti Gourde
1 Philippine Peso = 4.98796 Hungarian Forint
1 Philippine Peso = 262.6801 Indonesian Rupiah
1 Philippine Peso = 0.06734 Israeli Shekel
1 Philippine Peso = 1.2595 Indian Rupee
1 Philippine Peso = 23.36688 Iraqi Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 722.49855 Iran Rial
1 Philippine Peso = 2.02684 Iceland Krona
1 Philippine Peso = 2.44306 Jamaican Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01395 Jordanian Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 2.18305 Japanese Yen
1 Philippine Peso = 2.02388 Kenyan Shilling
1 Philippine Peso = 1.36803 Kyrgyzstan Som
1 Philippine Peso = 79.05665 Cambodia Riel
1 Philippine Peso = 8.11131 Comoros Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 17.76199 North Korean Won
1 Philippine Peso = 21.05013 Korean Won
1 Philippine Peso = 0.00592 Kuwaiti Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01618 Cayman Islands Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 6.40616 Kazakhstan Tenge
1 Philippine Peso = 163.40439 Lao Kip
1 Philippine Peso = 29.70989 Lebanese Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 3.03631 Sri Lanka Rupee
1 Philippine Peso = 2.51372 Liberian Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.24018 Lesotho Loti
1 Philippine Peso = 0.06017 Lithuanian Lita
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01225 Latvian Lat
1 Philippine Peso = 0.02645 Libyan Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.1822 Moroccan Dirham
1 Philippine Peso = 0.33221 Moldovan Leu
1 Philippine Peso = 0.99072 Macedonian Denar
1 Philippine Peso = 26.54431 Myanmar Kyat
1 Philippine Peso = 47.6416 Mongolian Tugrik
1 Philippine Peso = 0.15887 Macau Pataca
1 Philippine Peso = 6.94691 Mauritania Ougulya
1 Philippine Peso = 0.64535 Mauritius Rupee
1 Philippine Peso = 0.3059 Maldives Rufiyaa
1 Philippine Peso = 14.08092 Malawi Kwacha
1 Philippine Peso = 0.36718 Mexican Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 0.07768 Malaysian Ringgit
1 Philippine Peso = 0.24178 Namibian Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 7.06532 Nigerian Naira
1 Philippine Peso = 0.6045 Nicaragua Cordoba
1 Philippine Peso = 0.15516 Norwegian Krone
1 Philippine Peso = 2.01397 Nepalese Rupee
1 Philippine Peso = 0.02711 New Zealand Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.00759 Omani Rial
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01974 Panama Balboa
1 Philippine Peso = 0.06337 Peruvian Nuevo Sol
1 Philippine Peso = 0.06241 Papua New Guinea Kina
1 Philippine Peso = 1 Philippine Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 2.17782 Pakistani Rupee
1 Philippine Peso = 0.06737 Polish Zloty
1 Philippine Peso = 110.75588 Paraguayan Guarani
1 Philippine Peso = 0.07183 Qatar Rial
1 Philippine Peso = 0.07523 Romanian New Leu
1 Philippine Peso = 1.11021 Russian Rouble
1 Philippine Peso = 16.49398 Rwanda Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 0.07401 Saudi Arabian Riyal
1 Philippine Peso = 0.15294 Solomon Islands Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.26317 Seychelles Rupee
1 Philippine Peso = 0.13811 Sudanese Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 0.15903 Swedish Krona
1 Philippine Peso = 0.02605 Singapore Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01423 St Helena Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 0.43825 Slovak Koruna
1 Philippine Peso = 150.5822 Sierra Leone Leone
1 Philippine Peso = 11.09138 Somali Shilling
1 Philippine Peso = 395.67793 Sao Tome Dobra
1 Philippine Peso = 0.17269 El Salvador Colon
1 Philippine Peso = 10.16341 Syrian Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 0.24082 Swaziland Lilageni
1 Philippine Peso = 0.62838 Thai Baht
1 Philippine Peso = 0.04813 Tunisian Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.04392 Tongan paʻanga
1 Philippine Peso = 0.07512 Turkish Lira
1 Philippine Peso = 0.1331 Trinidad Tobago Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.57902 Taiwan Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 44.22736 Tanzanian Shilling
1 Philippine Peso = 0.56937 Ukraine Hryvnia
1 Philippine Peso = 71.46241 Ugandan Shilling
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01974 United States Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.56325 Uruguayan New Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 160.3513 Uzbekistan Sum
1 Philippine Peso = 0.19686 Venezuelan Bolivar
1 Philippine Peso = 447.97712 Vietnam Dong
1 Philippine Peso = 2.03691 Vanuatu Vatu
1 Philippine Peso = 0.0496 Samoa Tala
1 Philippine Peso = 10.5818 CFA Franc (BEAC)
1 Philippine Peso = 0.05329 East Caribbean Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 10.49813 CFA Franc (BCEAO)
1 Philippine Peso = 1.92441 Pacific Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 4.9329 Yemen Riyal
1 Philippine Peso = 0.24034 South African Rand
1 Philippine Peso = 102.41761 Zambian Kwacha
1 Philippine Peso = 7.14229 Zimbabwe dollar

Juvenile justice and welfare (2)

EXCERPTED from Sen. Pangilinan’s speech at the 3rd National Family Courts Summit, Manila Hotel, 3 August 2017:

Police statistics show that less than 2 percent of offenses or crimes committed under our criminal laws are by minors; 98%+ are committed by adults. Adolescents are less able to consider the long-term consequences of their actions; they are less concerned about risk, and more concerned about rewards; they are defenseless to coercive, bullying circumstances. And they cannot assert their own decisions and get themselves away from crime-prone settings. 

PNP candidly admitted that children in conflict with the law are often used and abused by adults, including people in authority like family, scalawag policemen and corrupt barangay officials. They are very, very vulnerable. In such situations, children are powerless. They fear retribution, do not have or are not aware of alternative actions, or they look up to or are emotionally attached to these criminal influences around them. 

Data will show that behind children in conflict with the law (hamog boys or the bukas kotse gang of drug-runners) look up to criminal syndicates; adults who prey and take advantage of their obedience as children. Also, unlike adults, adolescents are more susceptible to peer pressure because at this stage, they desire for approval and belonging. Peers and adults serve as models of behavior. Peer pressure is a major factor why juvenile crimes tend to happen in groups or gangs. The law ought to get after gangs and criminal syndicates. The law must not put first-offender kids in with hardened criminals.

 Why are we so hung on putting children aged 9 in jail when less than 2% of the crimes are committed by kids? The second principle under the law is: It takes a village to raise a child. With this, the law provided for the creation of local councils for the protection of children. I don’t have the data now but I assume that many of these councils are not functional or have not been created. This is a challenge. None of us want our children to be taken cared of by government. It’s not government’s responsibility to take care of children. It is the parents’, it is the family, and at most, the extended family--the community.

So we have to have community participation and involvement. The local councils for the protection of children was envisioned to be a group composed of citizens, personalities, organizations, community, Rotary, Kiwanis, Catholic Women’s League, NGOs coming together and deciding, providing inputs for how children in conflict with the law maybe cared for and the issue addressed in their communities. Apart from the creation of the councils for the protection of children, the comprehensive juvenile intervention programs, community-based programs on
juvenile justice and welfare, and community diversion programs. All these are meant to make children in conflict with the law accountable for their action while ensuring their rehabilitation to become useful, responsible citizens of the country.

How have we done so far? In 2014, UNICEF commissioned an evaluation to assess these programs involving 15 facilities. These are the Regional Rehabilitation & Youth Centers, Bahay Pag-Asa. The good news: Most facilities provide an enabling environment for rehabilitation.

There, most youth offenders were able to continue their formal schooling. Some were able to attend vocational training programs. And the residential programs were able to reshape their behavior through various spiritual, value-formation, and recreational activities.

Sen. Pangilinan concludes: “I remember one case, he was here in Manila, he was 14 years old, he was a leader of a gang, and he was involved also in the use of drugs. If the law were not in place, clearly he would have been brought to the city jail, clearly they would have filed criminal cases against him and obviously, that record would have condemned him for life, as a rule. But this boy, because of the law, went through a diversion program with the ERDA Foundation. He was given the necessary skills. So from being a gang leader, he is now a sales assistant in one of the convenience stores here in Manila; a new life. 

“Another case, acts of lasciviousness, a boy 16 years old, the father of the girl filed a criminal case, etc. acts of lasciviousness. If this law was not in place, he would have been tried in our regular criminal courts and obviously put in the city jail, etc. but because of this law, he was able to go through a diversion program, ended up going through a course on marine/seafaring; now a seaman sending money to his parents. He would not been such without this law. Therefore this is precisely giving our young people a second chance because we all make mistakes. 

“The UNICEF-commissioned study thus recommended: Fully implement and adequately comply with the law and its 2013 amendment, including the allocation of sufficient funds and competent people. Things have developed and progressed, have become a little better than before in terms of the implementation of this law. In Davao region for example, when this law was passed, there was only one rehabilitation center for the youth offenders. Today, there are five.

“The law, in 2013 when in was amended, provided for additional close to half a billion pesos worth of funds for infrastructure building and rehabilitation centers. At the same time we must continue to close the gap between what the law provides and how the law is understood and implemented by government officials particularly the local government and also how it is understood and reported by the mass media.

“The truth is, more than half of the crimes committed by youthful offenders are crimes against property, stealing personal property. And close to 90% of these offenders are actually first-time offenders. We must recognize that first offense. The recidivists, hardened, unreformed, incorrigible youth, would be around 10% of the cases, yet this 10% seems to be the poster boy for the Juvenile Justice and Welfare Council. They don’t talk about the 90%, the first time offenders. They’re talking about those who committed serious offenses. So we have to also explain, and be able to connect, communicate.

“For standing firm with children in conflict with the law, and with the law that keeps them away from adult detention centers, we have been criticized repeatedly. Somebody said that the law is the stupid ‘Pangilinan law’ but that’s okay because I know that many young people have benefited from this law. Many have been able to turn a new leaf. Many have better futures precisely because this law is in place. So let the critics say what they want. We have a law that has provided our people with the opportunity to move away from wrongdoing. Let us give young people who have gone astray this opportunity. Let us allow them to start anew. Let us all do our part to properly implement the Juvenile Justice and Welfare Act, as amended. Let us, as a village, do what’s right for our children.” 

***

Dahliaspillera@yahoo.com
Rating: 
No votes yet

Column of the Day

About noxious candles; man’s cunning

By DAHLI ASPILLERA | January 19,2018
‘Few things set the romantic atmosphere of the gentle flicker of a fragrant candle’s flame, be it on the dining table, in the bathroom, on the backyard table on a starry night.’

Opinion of the Day

Carpio’s terms for PH Rise research

By ELLEN TORDESILLAS | January 19, 2018
‘China should not be allowed to conduct marine scientific research in Philippine Rise which the United Nations Commission on the Law of the Sea has recognized as part of the Philippine extended continental shelf.’