December 18, 2017, 6:43 pm
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1 Philippine Peso = 0.07288 UAE Dirham
1 Philippine Peso = 2.24593 Albanian Lek
1 Philippine Peso = 0.03533 Neth Antilles Guilder
1 Philippine Peso = 0.34712 Argentine Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 0.02593 Australian Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.03533 Aruba Florin
1 Philippine Peso = 0.0397 Barbados Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 1.63815 Bangladesh Taka
1 Philippine Peso = 0.03288 Bulgarian Lev
1 Philippine Peso = 0.00748 Bahraini Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 34.75546 Burundi Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01985 Bermuda Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.02675 Brunei Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.13617 Bolivian Boliviano
1 Philippine Peso = 0.06539 Brazilian Real
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01985 Bahamian Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 1.2763 Bhutan Ngultrum
1 Philippine Peso = 0.20411 Botswana Pula
1 Philippine Peso = 397.3799 Belarus Ruble
1 Philippine Peso = 0.03965 Belize Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.02552 Canadian Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01965 Swiss Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 12.62406 Chilean Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 0.13118 Chinese Yuan
1 Philippine Peso = 59.40849 Colombian Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 11.184 Costa Rica Colon
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01985 Cuban Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 1.86245 Cape Verde Escudo
1 Philippine Peso = 0.43364 Czech Koruna
1 Philippine Peso = 3.50992 Djibouti Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 0.12575 Danish Krone
1 Philippine Peso = 0.94204 Dominican Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 2.28011 Algerian Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.26427 Estonian Kroon
1 Philippine Peso = 0.35252 Egyptian Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 0.5391 Ethiopian Birr
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01689 Euro
1 Philippine Peso = 0.04119 Fiji Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01488 Falkland Islands Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 0.0149 British Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 0.08949 Ghanaian Cedi
1 Philippine Peso = 0.93628 Gambian Dalasi
1 Philippine Peso = 177.61016 Guinea Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 0.14561 Guatemala Quetzal
1 Philippine Peso = 4.01171 Guyana Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.15502 Hong Kong Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.46602 Honduras Lempira
1 Philippine Peso = 0.12717 Croatian Kuna
1 Philippine Peso = 1.24851 Haiti Gourde
1 Philippine Peso = 5.30468 Hungarian Forint
1 Philippine Peso = 269.45216 Indonesian Rupiah
1 Philippine Peso = 0.0697 Israeli Shekel
1 Philippine Peso = 1.27173 Indian Rupee
1 Philippine Peso = 23.50139 Iraqi Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 706.60975 Iran Rial
1 Philippine Peso = 2.09111 Iceland Krona
1 Philippine Peso = 2.47122 Jamaican Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01404 Jordanian Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 2.23456 Japanese Yen
1 Philippine Peso = 2.04347 Kenyan Shilling
1 Philippine Peso = 1.38392 Kyrgyzstan Som
1 Philippine Peso = 79.89281 Cambodia Riel
1 Philippine Peso = 8.1582 Comoros Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 17.86423 North Korean Won
1 Philippine Peso = 21.58495 Korean Won
1 Philippine Peso = 0.00599 Kuwaiti Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01628 Cayman Islands Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 6.65919 Kazakhstan Tenge
1 Philippine Peso = 164.78761 Lao Kip
1 Philippine Peso = 29.88289 Lebanese Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 3.0389 Sri Lanka Rupee
1 Philippine Peso = 2.48432 Liberian Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.26141 Lesotho Loti
1 Philippine Peso = 0.06051 Lithuanian Lita
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01232 Latvian Lat
1 Philippine Peso = 0.02704 Libyan Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.1878 Moroccan Dirham
1 Philippine Peso = 0.33869 Moldovan Leu
1 Philippine Peso = 1.03414 Macedonian Denar
1 Philippine Peso = 27.03454 Myanmar Kyat
1 Philippine Peso = 48.15403 Mongolian Tugrik
1 Philippine Peso = 0.15967 Macau Pataca
1 Philippine Peso = 6.9869 Mauritania Ougulya
1 Philippine Peso = 0.67209 Mauritius Rupee
1 Philippine Peso = 0.30905 Maldives Rufiyaa
1 Philippine Peso = 14.16276 Malawi Kwacha
1 Philippine Peso = 0.37963 Mexican Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 0.08094 Malaysian Ringgit
1 Philippine Peso = 0.2608 Namibian Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 7.10599 Nigerian Naira
1 Philippine Peso = 0.60838 Nicaragua Cordoba
1 Philippine Peso = 0.16635 Norwegian Krone
1 Philippine Peso = 2.03573 Nepalese Rupee
1 Philippine Peso = 0.02839 New Zealand Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.00762 Omani Rial
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01985 Panama Balboa
1 Philippine Peso = 0.06535 Peruvian Nuevo Sol
1 Philippine Peso = 0.06434 Papua New Guinea Kina
1 Philippine Peso = 1 Philippine Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 2.17745 Pakistani Rupee
1 Philippine Peso = 0.07099 Polish Zloty
1 Philippine Peso = 111.57205 Paraguayan Guarani
1 Philippine Peso = 0.07225 Qatar Rial
1 Philippine Peso = 0.07797 Romanian New Leu
1 Philippine Peso = 1.1679 Russian Rouble
1 Philippine Peso = 16.58892 Rwanda Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 0.07443 Saudi Arabian Riyal
1 Philippine Peso = 0.15358 Solomon Islands Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.26852 Seychelles Rupee
1 Philippine Peso = 0.13219 Sudanese Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 0.16899 Swedish Krona
1 Philippine Peso = 0.02675 Singapore Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01489 St Helena Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 0.44077 Slovak Koruna
1 Philippine Peso = 151.44898 Sierra Leone Leone
1 Philippine Peso = 11.09567 Somali Shilling
1 Philippine Peso = 413.80507 Sao Tome Dobra
1 Philippine Peso = 0.17368 El Salvador Colon
1 Philippine Peso = 10.22191 Syrian Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 0.26054 Swaziland Lilageni
1 Philippine Peso = 0.6449 Thai Baht
1 Philippine Peso = 0.04961 Tunisian Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.04557 Tongan paʻanga
1 Philippine Peso = 0.07666 Turkish Lira
1 Philippine Peso = 0.13159 Trinidad Tobago Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.5944 Taiwan Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 44.30329 Tanzanian Shilling
1 Philippine Peso = 0.54875 Ukraine Hryvnia
1 Philippine Peso = 71.55617 Ugandan Shilling
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01985 United States Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.57046 Uruguayan New Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 160.57959 Uzbekistan Sum
1 Philippine Peso = 0.198 Venezuelan Bolivar
1 Philippine Peso = 450.55577 Vietnam Dong
1 Philippine Peso = 2.09845 Vanuatu Vatu
1 Philippine Peso = 0.05144 Samoa Tala
1 Philippine Peso = 11.07165 CFA Franc (BEAC)
1 Philippine Peso = 0.05359 East Caribbean Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 11.49782 CFA Franc (BCEAO)
1 Philippine Peso = 2.00337 Pacific Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 4.96129 Yemen Riyal
1 Philippine Peso = 0.26079 South African Rand
1 Philippine Peso = 103.00714 Zambian Kwacha
1 Philippine Peso = 7.18341 Zimbabwe dollar

Of imbeciles, budgets, freedom of speech

THE viewing public was treated to a dressing down of a head executive assistant by members of the House of Representatives, led by majority floor leader Rudy Fariñas. I was quite surprised in the beginning why ranking members of the Lower House would devote time during a congressional hearing to interrogate a head executive assistant (unless he or she is the subject of the probe, of course) until the crux of the matter revealed itself: she had called Speaker Bebot Alvarez an “imbecile” on Facebook. Apparently, Mandy Anderson felt so strongly against Alvarez threatening to abolish the Court of Appeals that she called him an “imbecile” and questioned the ability of 200+ members of Congress to pick their leader.

Of course, nothing raises the hackles of our friends in Congress than disrespect towards their own, which explains the close to twenty minutes of airtime spent putting Anderson on a spit and grilling her. But we’ll get to that later. HEAs, or head executive assistants, typically have the unique trait of blending in the background. Most of them go unnoticed, choosing to do their work in the background to support their principals. Woe the staff member whose behavior causes a problem for the principal, whose fate will inevitably hang in the balance especially if the offended party wields some power to obstruct your agency’s budget.

Being a staffer is a unique position: you are expected to serve your principal to the best of your abilities, without drawing attention to yourself in any way. After all, some bosses do take offense at being overshadowed by staff. Those in the background endeavor to stay in the background, as unnecessary public attention may jeopardize the work being done by your office in so many ways. While many may view this as an infringement on the freedom of speech, it is an unwritten rule among veteran staffers that your personal opinions take a backseat to the work at hand. This particular tradition has become increasingly challenging in the age of social media, where the lines between personal and official become more blurred every day.

Working in government does not preclude one from having an opinion on politics, and in the case of Anderson, netizens have cheered her on to continue speaking truth to power. I agree with Rep. Fariñas though that the right must be balanced with the corresponding obligation under the Code of Conduct and Ethical Standards for Public Officials and Employees relative to professionalism. To be clear, Anderson’s right to express her displeasure at Alvarez’s threat to abolish the Court of Appeals is set on firm ground; however, as a consultant to the Commissioner of Customs, it would have been prudent to express this displeasure in a manner that would not prejudice her work or that of her principal. It’s budget season once again, where legislators can and will not hesitate to hold your agency’s budget hostage at the slightest provocation, warranted or not.

Imagine a situation where your entire agency has slaved away for months to prepare for your budget hearing in Congress, only to be sidelined by personal grudges such as the imbecile incident. Choices have to be made consciously, and most do opt to keep quiet on social media rather than jeopardize the work, or worse, be the cause of delaying progress.

Similarly, the fact that more politicians seem to be in the habit of cussing out their enemies in the public sphere should not make us cheer for those who share our opinions who employ the same tactic, if only to act as a foil against those who belong on the other side of our beliefs.

There is an emerging back story to the entire grilling of Anderson, which may probably explain the attention the lady received from our legislators. She had apparently denied the “recommendation” of Speaker Alvarez for the promotion of a certain Customs employee due to lack of qualification. Something tells me we haven’t seen the end of it, yet. We’ve yet to see if Anderson will survive this fiasco, considering that the daughter of the man she called an imbecile is a ranking official of the Department of Finance, which exercises supervision over the Bureau of Customs.

The Anderson episode should also serve as a reminder to public officials about the nature of the beast that is social media. Whatever you put out there, whether your settings are private or public, is out for the entire internet to see. You see this emerging trend in the private sector where interviewers, headhunters and HR people go through the social media accounts of applicants to get a sense of their behavior online. While an odd post may deny an applicant the opportunity to work for a prospective employer, the damage can be much greater to government employees working in politically sensitive positions.

I know what you’re probably thinking: working in government comes with strings attached, many that you may not be amenable to accepting. You’re probably correct, which is why anyone who comes to me for advice when it comes to giving up a cushy spot in the private sector to work in government always gets this bit of advice: one must believe in the work that your principal wants to do, otherwise it is just not worth the potential aggravation.
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