September 23, 2017, 3:19 pm
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1 Philippine Peso = 0.03473 Neth Antilles Guilder
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1 Philippine Peso = 0.34589 Egyptian Pound
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1 Philippine Peso = 0.01644 Euro
1 Philippine Peso = 0.03953 Fiji Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01454 Falkland Islands Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01447 British Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 0.08679 Ghanaian Cedi
1 Philippine Peso = 0.87895 Gambian Dalasi
1 Philippine Peso = 174.63213 Guinea Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 0.14311 Guatemala Quetzal
1 Philippine Peso = 3.97705 Guyana Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.15314 Hong Kong Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.45756 Honduras Lempira
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1 Philippine Peso = 5.08986 Hungarian Forint
1 Philippine Peso = 260.48656 Indonesian Rupiah
1 Philippine Peso = 0.0688 Israeli Shekel
1 Philippine Peso = 1.27132 Indian Rupee
1 Philippine Peso = 22.89582 Iraqi Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 658.62271 Iran Rial
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1 Philippine Peso = 2.56229 Jamaican Dollar
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1 Philippine Peso = 2.20489 Japanese Yen
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1 Philippine Peso = 1.3433 Kyrgyzstan Som
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1 Philippine Peso = 0.00592 Kuwaiti Dinar
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1 Philippine Peso = 0.01217 Latvian Lat
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1 Philippine Peso = 0.34501 Moldovan Leu
1 Philippine Peso = 1.00647 Macedonian Denar
1 Philippine Peso = 26.68236 Myanmar Kyat
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1 Philippine Peso = 7.0826 Mauritania Ougulya
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1 Philippine Peso = 0.34969 Mexican Peso
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1 Philippine Peso = 0.2598 Namibian Dollar
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1 Philippine Peso = 0.58623 Nicaragua Cordoba
1 Philippine Peso = 0.15332 Norwegian Krone
1 Philippine Peso = 2.01197 Nepalese Rupee
1 Philippine Peso = 0.02683 New Zealand Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.00755 Omani Rial
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01962 Panama Balboa
1 Philippine Peso = 0.06369 Peruvian Nuevo Sol
1 Philippine Peso = 0.06268 Papua New Guinea Kina
1 Philippine Peso = 1 Philippine Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 2.06494 Pakistani Rupee
1 Philippine Peso = 0.07028 Polish Zloty
1 Philippine Peso = 111.25171 Paraguayan Guarani
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1 Philippine Peso = 0.0755 Romanian New Leu
1 Philippine Peso = 1.13354 Russian Rouble
1 Philippine Peso = 16.2576 Rwanda Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 0.07357 Saudi Arabian Riyal
1 Philippine Peso = 0.15204 Solomon Islands Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.2669 Seychelles Rupee
1 Philippine Peso = 0.13067 Sudanese Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 0.15655 Swedish Krona
1 Philippine Peso = 0.02649 Singapore Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01455 St Helena Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 0.43567 Slovak Koruna
1 Philippine Peso = 147.14538 Sierra Leone Leone
1 Philippine Peso = 10.928 Somali Shilling
1 Philippine Peso = 402.77613 Sao Tome Dobra
1 Philippine Peso = 0.17167 El Salvador Colon
1 Philippine Peso = 10.10359 Syrian Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 0.2598 Swaziland Lilageni
1 Philippine Peso = 0.64921 Thai Baht
1 Philippine Peso = 0.04791 Tunisian Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.0432 Tongan paʻanga
1 Philippine Peso = 0.06876 Turkish Lira
1 Philippine Peso = 0.13239 Trinidad Tobago Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.59217 Taiwan Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 43.90818 Tanzanian Shilling
1 Philippine Peso = 0.51422 Ukraine Hryvnia
1 Philippine Peso = 70.57092 Ugandan Shilling
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01962 United States Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.56582 Uruguayan New Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 158.34804 Uzbekistan Sum
1 Philippine Peso = 0.19569 Venezuelan Bolivar
1 Philippine Peso = 445.73278 Vietnam Dong
1 Philippine Peso = 2.0155 Vanuatu Vatu
1 Philippine Peso = 0.04907 Samoa Tala
1 Philippine Peso = 10.773 CFA Franc (BEAC)
1 Philippine Peso = 0.05297 East Caribbean Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 10.75142 CFA Franc (BCEAO)
1 Philippine Peso = 1.95017 Pacific Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 4.90386 Yemen Riyal
1 Philippine Peso = 0.25991 South African Rand
1 Philippine Peso = 101.81479 Zambian Kwacha
1 Philippine Peso = 7.10025 Zimbabwe dollar

In the heart

HERE aboard the USS Hornet Sea, Air and Space Museum, a student of history can learn STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, Math) through the lens of a WWII era aircraft carrier, the preservation of thousands of valuable artifacts, seamanship (especially for naval cadets), and the lessons of trans-oceanic war.

Berthed at Pier 3, Alameda Point, California, the 10-story tall, city-block long warship is the home of 6,000 historically significant artifacts and 25 exhibits, providing researchers, tourists and war-fighters with highlights of the Second World War, Cold War and the American Space Program. The warship CV-8 carried the gutsy Doolittle Raiders in 1942 and the postwar USS Hornet was the naval vessel that made the perfect recovery of the Apollo 11 space capsule.

Aboard the aircraft carrier, we saw the USS Hornet Legacy, five-inch naval guns, a flight simulator, the Apollo Splashdown Exhibit, a torpedo workshop and the Air Group 11 Exhibit, among others. This American national treasure in its eighth iteration was commissioned as a CV (No. 12) on 29 November 1943 (the same day when Yugoslav partisan commander Josip Broz Tito formed a temporary government in Jajce, Bosnia), carried 100 warplanes and a crew of 3,400, survived 59 Japanese attacks, and had gone 15 months at sea (without docking) in a war patrol in the Pacific.

The first USS Hornet (CV-8) of WWII (a Yorktown-class aircraft carrier of the United States Navy) had launched the Doolittle Raid on Tokyo and joined its victorious sister-ships in the Battle of Midway, while the second USS Hornet (the Essex-class CV-12) of WWII raided enemy units on Tinian and Saipan, destroyed Japanese assets in “The Marianas Turkey Shoot,” was in the Battle for Leyte Gulf, and joined Operation Magic Carpet. The historic CV-8 was unfortunately sunk at the Battle of Santa Cruz (27 October 1942), but CV-12 went on to participate in the Vietnam War and assist in the first Moon landing programs.

The USS Hornet aircraft carrier as CV-12 was never hit by Japanese bombs, torpedoes and kamikaze suicide planes and its pilots shot down a record 62 enemy aircraft in one day (Marianas Turkey Shoot) and 255 Nipponese warplanes in one month. In fact, the Presidential Unit Citation from the Secretary of the Navy to the USS Hornet and her attached Air Groups, dated 1945, credited the battle group for the following operations: March 29 to May 1,1944, Palau, Hollandia, Truk; June 11 to August 5, 1944, Marianas, Bonins, Yap; September 6 to 24, 1944, Philippines, Palau: AG-2 (VF-2, VB-2, VT-2, Part of VFN-76); October 10 to November 22, 1944, Ryukyus, Formosa, Philippines, Luzon; December 14 to 16, 1944, Luzon; January 3 to 22, 1945, Philippines, Formosa, China Sea, Ryukyus: AG-11 (VF-11, VB-11, VT-11); and February 16 to June 10, 1945, Japan, Bonins, Ryukyus: AG-17 (VF-17, VBF-17, VB-17, VT-17). [http://library.uta.edu/txdisabilityhistory/doc/20006424]

A participant in the USS Hornet Sea, Air and Space Museum Live-Aboard Program can learn: “Carriers do not put out to sea to do battle alone. We were accompanied by two cruisers (USS Northampton [CA-26] and USS Salt Lake City [CA-25]), four destroyers, and a fleet oiler (USS Sabine [AO-25J]). Such a group is designated a “task force” and given a number. We were Task Force 16.2. The ships steam in formation with the carrier at the center, the cruisers close by, and the destroyers a little farther out to provide a screen for the others. This arrangement is not carved in stone and will vary according to circumstances.” [Rev. Robert Lee Consolvo, A Firsthand Account Of The Sinking Of The USS Hornet, http://communityengagement.whro.org/images/pdf/theWar_ussHornet_consolvo.pdf]

We were glad to spend an afternoon aboard the Grey Ghost (nickname of the 27,000-ton aircraft carrier that downed 1,400 Japanese aircraft and sank 1,250,000 tons of enemy shipping in the Pacific War). We saw on its deck a TBM-3-Avenger Torpedo Bomber, the VT-17 aircraft that scored the first torpedo hits on the Japanese battleship Yamato on 07 April 1945. Upon review, we re-learned the significance of the Battle of Midway (June 2017 marked the 75th anniversary): “Torpedo Squadron Eight from the Hornet was shot down to the last plane, but only after making several hits on four enemy carriers.”

“The Japs Are Defeated. On the two following days planes from Hornet and the Enterprise located the fleeing enemy and further damaged four cruisers and a destroyer. Due to poor visibility and the dispersal of the fleeing Japanese ships, we were unable to come up with them again, and the battle was at an end.” [http://gutenberg.net.au/ebooks11/1100731h/V6/V6P.html]

“This battle, fought almost entirely by air and during which the opposing surface ships never even sighted each other, was the first decisive defeat suffered by the Japanese Navy in 350 years. But more important, it ended the period of Japanese offensive activity in the Pacific, removed the threat to Hawaii and the West Coast, and paved the way for our assumption of the offensive in the Pacific—an offensive that through successive stages saw us reconquer the Solomon Islands, Guam, and the Philippines, capture Tarawa, Saipan, Iwo Jima, and Okinawa, break the back of the Japanese Fleet in the Battle of the Philippine Sea and the Battle of Leyte Gulf, and eventually blockade and bomb Japan into submission from her own home waters.” [The Battle Of Midway by Vice-Admiral Frank J. Fletcher, USN]

Here in California we also experienced this year’s San Francisco Comic Con where a celebrity autograph at the “Star Signing” area of the exhibit hall can set you back 100 dollars (like that of Peter Capaldi, the 12th actor to portray sci-fi character Doctor Who from 2013 to 2017). You can meet the comics creators at their table in the “Guest Artist Alley” like Neal Adams whose “Batman work serves as a prototype and inspiration for every illustrator of the character.” [https://sanfrancomiccon.com/guest-bios/neal-adams-bio/]

This is the venue to acquire materials like Mark Fertig’s “Take That, Adolf!: The Fighting Comic Books Of The Second World War” and learn: “Between 1941 and 1945, the greatest super villain to adorn a comic book cover was not the Red Skull or The Joker — it was Adolf Hitler! Yes, Hitler was featured on more comic book covers than any other villain — being pummeled by everyone from Captain America to Wonder Woman, until he was beaten for real by the Allied forces. Take That, Adolf! is a compilation of more than 500 stunningly restored comics covers published during World War II.” [http://www.fantagraphics.com/takethatadolf/]

Finally, here in California we re-read Carlos Bulosan’s America is in the Heart: “When Amado had gone, Macario stopped working and walked the streets aimlessly for weeks, then joined the army the day Corregidor fell to the Japanese.” [p. 323]
Rating: 
Average: 5 (3 votes)

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