June 26, 2017, 10:11 am
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1 Philippine Peso = 0.07443 UAE Dirham
1 Philippine Peso = 2.4017 Albanian Lek
1 Philippine Peso = 0.03628 Neth Antilles Guilder
1 Philippine Peso = 0.32436 Argentine Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 0.02723 Australian Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.03626 Aruba Florin
1 Philippine Peso = 0.04054 Barbados Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 1.63579 Bangladesh Taka
1 Philippine Peso = 0.03534 Bulgarian Lev
1 Philippine Peso = 0.00763 Bahraini Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 34.60377 Burundi Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 0.02027 Bermuda Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.02797 Brunei Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.13904 Bolivian Boliviano
1 Philippine Peso = 0.06579 Brazilian Real
1 Philippine Peso = 0.02027 Bahamian Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 1.30624 Bhutan Ngultrum
1 Philippine Peso = 0.20692 Botswana Pula
1 Philippine Peso = 405.75598 Belarus Ruble
1 Philippine Peso = 0.04049 Belize Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.02733 Canadian Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01952 Swiss Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 13.57175 Chilean Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 0.13799 Chinese Yuan
1 Philippine Peso = 58.59343 Colombian Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 11.43535 Costa Rica Colon
1 Philippine Peso = 0.02027 Cuban Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 1.98075 Cape Verde Escudo
1 Philippine Peso = 0.47231 Czech Koruna
1 Philippine Peso = 3.59951 Djibouti Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 0.13357 Danish Krone
1 Philippine Peso = 0.95278 Dominican Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 2.19181 Algerian Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.28109 Estonian Kroon
1 Philippine Peso = 0.36583 Egyptian Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 0.46433 Ethiopian Birr
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01797 Euro
1 Philippine Peso = 0.04244 Fiji Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01573 Falkland Islands Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01572 British Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 0.08685 Ghanaian Cedi
1 Philippine Peso = 0.91021 Gambian Dalasi
1 Philippine Peso = 182.75233 Guinea Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 0.1491 Guatemala Quetzal
1 Philippine Peso = 4.14512 Guyana Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.15784 Hong Kong Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.47422 Honduras Lempira
1 Philippine Peso = 0.13229 Croatian Kuna
1 Philippine Peso = 1.24625 Haiti Gourde
1 Philippine Peso = 5.54195 Hungarian Forint
1 Philippine Peso = 269.57844 Indonesian Rupiah
1 Philippine Peso = 0.07211 Israeli Shekel
1 Philippine Peso = 1.30521 Indian Rupee
1 Philippine Peso = 23.93595 Iraqi Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 657.62059 Iran Rial
1 Philippine Peso = 1.9771 Iceland Krona
1 Philippine Peso = 2.6139 Jamaican Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01433 Jordanian Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 2.23666 Japanese Yen
1 Philippine Peso = 2.0906 Kenyan Shilling
1 Philippine Peso = 1.38113 Kyrgyzstan Som
1 Philippine Peso = 81.57681 Cambodia Riel
1 Philippine Peso = 9.12404 Comoros Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 18.24078 North Korean Won
1 Philippine Peso = 22.6366 Korean Won
1 Philippine Peso = 0.00614 Kuwaiti Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01662 Cayman Islands Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 6.364 Kazakhstan Tenge
1 Philippine Peso = 166.08836 Lao Kip
1 Philippine Peso = 30.51277 Lebanese Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 3.08877 Sri Lanka Rupee
1 Philippine Peso = 1.84435 Liberian Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.25922 Lesotho Loti
1 Philippine Peso = 0.06179 Lithuanian Lita
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01258 Latvian Lat
1 Philippine Peso = 0.02821 Libyan Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.19642 Moroccan Dirham
1 Philippine Peso = 0.36735 Moldovan Leu
1 Philippine Peso = 1.09972 Macedonian Denar
1 Philippine Peso = 27.52331 Myanmar Kyat
1 Philippine Peso = 48.27726 Mongolian Tugrik
1 Philippine Peso = 0.16258 Macau Pataca
1 Philippine Peso = 7.25578 Mauritania Ougulya
1 Philippine Peso = 0.70024 Mauritius Rupee
1 Philippine Peso = 0.31394 Maldives Rufiyaa
1 Philippine Peso = 14.54094 Malawi Kwacha
1 Philippine Peso = 0.37863 Mexican Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 0.08672 Malaysian Ringgit
1 Philippine Peso = 0.2604 Namibian Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 6.52615 Nigerian Naira
1 Philippine Peso = 0.59972 Nicaragua Cordoba
1 Philippine Peso = 0.17055 Norwegian Krone
1 Philippine Peso = 2.08654 Nepalese Rupee
1 Philippine Peso = 0.02835 New Zealand Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.00779 Omani Rial
1 Philippine Peso = 0.02027 Panama Balboa
1 Philippine Peso = 0.06622 Peruvian Nuevo Sol
1 Philippine Peso = 0.06654 Papua New Guinea Kina
1 Philippine Peso = 1 Philippine Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 2.11897 Pakistani Rupee
1 Philippine Peso = 0.0753 Polish Zloty
1 Philippine Peso = 112.82935 Paraguayan Guarani
1 Philippine Peso = 0.0738 Qatar Rial
1 Philippine Peso = 0.08196 Romanian New Leu
1 Philippine Peso = 1.14766 Russian Rouble
1 Philippine Peso = 16.61897 Rwanda Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 0.076 Saudi Arabian Riyal
1 Philippine Peso = 0.16004 Solomon Islands Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.26836 Seychelles Rupee
1 Philippine Peso = 0.13498 Sudanese Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 0.17451 Swedish Krona
1 Philippine Peso = 0.02797 Singapore Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01573 St Helena Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 0.45006 Slovak Koruna
1 Philippine Peso = 152.00649 Sierra Leone Leone
1 Philippine Peso = 11.08634 Somali Shilling
1 Philippine Peso = 435.85326 Sao Tome Dobra
1 Philippine Peso = 0.17678 El Salvador Colon
1 Philippine Peso = 10.43737 Syrian Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 0.26014 Swaziland Lilageni
1 Philippine Peso = 0.6897 Thai Baht
1 Philippine Peso = 0.04917 Tunisian Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.04647 Tongan paʻanga
1 Philippine Peso = 0.0711 Turkish Lira
1 Philippine Peso = 0.13537 Trinidad Tobago Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.61011 Taiwan Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 45.17633 Tanzanian Shilling
1 Philippine Peso = 0.53223 Ukraine Hryvnia
1 Philippine Peso = 72.78071 Ugandan Shilling
1 Philippine Peso = 0.02027 United States Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.57377 Uruguayan New Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 77.82732 Uzbekistan Sum
1 Philippine Peso = 0.20216 Venezuelan Bolivar
1 Philippine Peso = 459.54601 Vietnam Dong
1 Philippine Peso = 2.18241 Vanuatu Vatu
1 Philippine Peso = 0.05201 Samoa Tala
1 Philippine Peso = 11.77483 CFA Franc (BEAC)
1 Philippine Peso = 0.05472 East Caribbean Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 11.82205 CFA Franc (BCEAO)
1 Philippine Peso = 2.13174 Pacific Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 5.06546 Yemen Riyal
1 Philippine Peso = 0.25921 South African Rand
1 Philippine Peso = 105.17835 Zambian Kwacha
1 Philippine Peso = 7.33482 Zimbabwe dollar

‘Generally peaceful and uneventful’

IT’S a standard joke among reporters covering the Philippine National Police: whenever asked for an assessment of the peace and order situation after Holy Week or All Souls’ Day. the standard reply is “generally peaceful and uneventful” no matter what may have actually transpired over the long break. It’s jargon easily understood by reporters and public information officers across the country, and makes for easy communication. To be fair, the phrase does describe most observations of Holy Week in the past years.

Predictably, PNP Chief Ronaldo dela Rosa used the oft-repeated phrase to describe this year’s Holy Week exodus. It was accompanied by a pat on the back for the public for cooperating with our security forces, whose efforts “ultimately resulted in the uneventful and generally peaceful Holy Week.”

Despite Bato’s statement, Holy Week 2017 was far from being uneventful. The populace woke up to news of a firefight between members of the Abu Sayyaf Group (ASG), Armed Forces of the Philippines, and the PNP in Inabanga, Bohol. The most jaded of us would have probably glossed over the news reports, saying it was nothing new, except that the security and defense junkies did not miss an all-too important jarring detail: the presence of the ASG in Bohol. Yes, in Bohol, land of tarsiers and white sand beaches, where foreign and domestic tourists alike go to see the famous Chocolate Hills.

The Department of Tourism, though visibly shaken, quickly issued a statement to assuage fears of terror activities in Central Visayas, aware that an incorrect response to the matter could spell a dip in tourist arrivals. Visitors in Bohol were treated to an unfamiliar but assuring sight: soldiers with high-powered firearms walking along the shore of Bohol’s pristine beaches. As we speak, the military is still hunting down ASG militants, leaving residents to evacuate to avoid getting caught in the crossfire. For all intents and purposes, life has not returned to normal in Inabanga, with the AFP establishing check points to net the bandits. Local officials have also chimed in the chorus of assurances, with Governor Ed Chatto saying that thus far, the local tourism industry has remained unaffected, with most establishments at 80% to 90% occupancy.

The dichotomy of Bohol’s current situation is pictured best by news footage from Inabanga and Panglao. In Inabanga, residents are huddled in evacuation centers, surrounded by soldiers; military personnel are going from house to house, holding up photos of the suspects. Meanwhile, vacationers in not-so far away Panglao go about their holiday with little fear, despite knowing about the tense situation on another side of paradise. 

This comes at the heels of separate travel advisories issued by the United States and France, warning its citizens of travel to Central Visayas. While the Philippines is no stranger to travel advisories, it is easily understandable how its issuance can be a sensitive matter to governments relying on tourism. In truth, there is a considerable back-and-forth between the host and the issuing country before the issuance of an advisory: security briefings, intelligence sharing, diplomatic negotiations, all intended to prevent the issuance or afford the host enough time to prepare for its repercussions.

Incidentally, another black eye to Dela Rosa’s “generally peaceful and uneventful” assessment comes yet again from the ASG, this time for the alleged beheading of one of its Filipino hostages, Noel Besconde, last Maundy Thursday. The ASG held Besconde for over a year before he was killed, with the military saying that Besconde had become sickly and therefore, a liability to the group’s constant cat-and-mouse with dragnet operations.

For sure, the presence of the ASG in Central Bohol is a thorn in the AFP’s side, as they have largely been able to keep the ASG at bay and far from wreaking havoc in most urban areas. It bears watching whether the presence of ASG in Bohol is a fluke or indicative of its expansion to other areas in the country. It’s been a while since an area outside Mindanao has been included in country travel advisories, and is certainly a cause for concern.

Whether we like it or not, terrorist activities pose extreme danger not only to life and limb but also to economic progress. Tourism is the first to suffer whenever there are security issues, as seen in the case of Paris in 2016, and the Brussels lockdown in 2015. While Tourism Secretary Wanda Teo has so far remained mum on the situation since her ill-conceived plea for journalists to “tone down” on their reporting of the nightly extra-judicial killings, for sure she and her team have their plates full with trying to control the fallout from the recent ASG activities.

One wonders whether President Rodrigo Duterte’s recent turnaround on needing the help of the United States on fighting terrorism is a tell-tale sign of the state of affairs when it comes to our anti-terrorism efforts. Mr. Duterte must already be feeling the strain caused by his actions, especially when it comes to intelligence sharing with the US military. How long the strain will last is anybody’s guess.


ALL ABOUT ABIGAIL
Issues facing government are not always about two sides. Abigail Valte’s law background and deep dive into government provides insight on its inner workings and what factors go into policy decision making. Her once a week column is an incision on current political and social issues.

 
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