October 18, 2017, 6:21 am
Facebook iconTwitter iconYouTube iconGoogle+ icon
1 Philippine Peso = 0.0717 UAE Dirham
1 Philippine Peso = 2.20871 Albanian Lek
1 Philippine Peso = 0.03475 Neth Antilles Guilder
1 Philippine Peso = 0.33813 Argentine Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 0.0248 Australian Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.03475 Aruba Florin
1 Philippine Peso = 0.03905 Barbados Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 1.57731 Bangladesh Taka
1 Philippine Peso = 0.03233 Bulgarian Lev
1 Philippine Peso = 0.00736 Bahraini Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 33.79539 Burundi Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01952 Bermuda Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.02637 Brunei Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.13393 Bolivian Boliviano
1 Philippine Peso = 0.0616 Brazilian Real
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01952 Bahamian Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 1.2666 Bhutan Ngultrum
1 Philippine Peso = 0.19953 Botswana Pula
1 Philippine Peso = 390.86294 Belarus Ruble
1 Philippine Peso = 0.039 Belize Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.02447 Canadian Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01905 Swiss Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 12.09684 Chilean Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 0.12863 Chinese Yuan
1 Philippine Peso = 57.20812 Colombian Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 11.07243 Costa Rica Colon
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01952 Cuban Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 1.82351 Cape Verde Escudo
1 Philippine Peso = 0.42558 Czech Koruna
1 Philippine Peso = 3.46544 Djibouti Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 0.12309 Danish Krone
1 Philippine Peso = 0.92112 Dominican Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 2.21712 Algerian Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.25865 Estonian Kroon
1 Philippine Peso = 0.3441 Egyptian Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 0.52519 Ethiopian Birr
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01653 Euro
1 Philippine Peso = 0.0399 Fiji Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01467 Falkland Islands Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01471 British Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 0.08578 Ghanaian Cedi
1 Philippine Peso = 0.91761 Gambian Dalasi
1 Philippine Peso = 173.50644 Guinea Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 0.14337 Guatemala Quetzal
1 Philippine Peso = 3.9752 Guyana Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.15244 Hong Kong Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.45638 Honduras Lempira
1 Philippine Peso = 0.12402 Croatian Kuna
1 Philippine Peso = 1.19621 Haiti Gourde
1 Philippine Peso = 5.08551 Hungarian Forint
1 Philippine Peso = 263.17844 Indonesian Rupiah
1 Philippine Peso = 0.0682 Israeli Shekel
1 Philippine Peso = 1.26328 Indian Rupee
1 Philippine Peso = 22.78407 Iraqi Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 667.88363 Iran Rial
1 Philippine Peso = 2.04705 Iceland Krona
1 Philippine Peso = 2.48653 Jamaican Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01381 Jordanian Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 2.1829 Japanese Yen
1 Philippine Peso = 2.01386 Kenyan Shilling
1 Philippine Peso = 1.33715 Kyrgyzstan Som
1 Philippine Peso = 78.73877 Cambodia Riel
1 Philippine Peso = 8.09352 Comoros Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 17.57126 North Korean Won
1 Philippine Peso = 21.9875 Korean Won
1 Philippine Peso = 0.00589 Kuwaiti Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01601 Cayman Islands Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 6.51054 Kazakhstan Tenge
1 Philippine Peso = 161.47403 Lao Kip
1 Philippine Peso = 29.39672 Lebanese Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 2.99785 Sri Lanka Rupee
1 Philippine Peso = 2.29988 Liberian Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.25908 Lesotho Loti
1 Philippine Peso = 0.05952 Lithuanian Lita
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01212 Latvian Lat
1 Philippine Peso = 0.02662 Libyan Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.18372 Moroccan Dirham
1 Philippine Peso = 0.33809 Moldovan Leu
1 Philippine Peso = 1.01269 Macedonian Denar
1 Philippine Peso = 26.59117 Myanmar Kyat
1 Philippine Peso = 47.89145 Mongolian Tugrik
1 Philippine Peso = 0.157 Macau Pataca
1 Philippine Peso = 7.04803 Mauritania Ougulya
1 Philippine Peso = 0.65892 Mauritius Rupee
1 Philippine Peso = 0.3034 Maldives Rufiyaa
1 Philippine Peso = 13.98223 Malawi Kwacha
1 Philippine Peso = 0.37125 Mexican Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 0.0823 Malaysian Ringgit
1 Philippine Peso = 0.25884 Namibian Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 6.89184 Nigerian Naira
1 Philippine Peso = 0.59176 Nicaragua Cordoba
1 Philippine Peso = 0.15391 Norwegian Krone
1 Philippine Peso = 2.0285 Nepalese Rupee
1 Philippine Peso = 0.02714 New Zealand Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.00751 Omani Rial
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01952 Panama Balboa
1 Philippine Peso = 0.06338 Peruvian Nuevo Sol
1 Philippine Peso = 0.06228 Papua New Guinea Kina
1 Philippine Peso = 1 Philippine Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 2.05076 Pakistani Rupee
1 Philippine Peso = 0.07005 Polish Zloty
1 Philippine Peso = 109.88871 Paraguayan Guarani
1 Philippine Peso = 0.07106 Qatar Rial
1 Philippine Peso = 0.07576 Romanian New Leu
1 Philippine Peso = 1.11582 Russian Rouble
1 Philippine Peso = 16.21398 Rwanda Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 0.07321 Saudi Arabian Riyal
1 Philippine Peso = 0.15248 Solomon Islands Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.26667 Seychelles Rupee
1 Philippine Peso = 0.13003 Sudanese Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 0.15841 Swedish Krona
1 Philippine Peso = 0.02638 Singapore Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01468 St Helena Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 0.43354 Slovak Koruna
1 Philippine Peso = 148.77001 Sierra Leone Leone
1 Philippine Peso = 10.91371 Somali Shilling
1 Philippine Peso = 405.15812 Sao Tome Dobra
1 Philippine Peso = 0.17083 El Salvador Colon
1 Philippine Peso = 10.05428 Syrian Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 0.25884 Swaziland Lilageni
1 Philippine Peso = 0.64526 Thai Baht
1 Philippine Peso = 0.04826 Tunisian Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.04364 Tongan paʻanga
1 Philippine Peso = 0.07093 Turkish Lira
1 Philippine Peso = 0.13039 Trinidad Tobago Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.58821 Taiwan Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 43.69387 Tanzanian Shilling
1 Philippine Peso = 0.51738 Ukraine Hryvnia
1 Philippine Peso = 71.10504 Ugandan Shilling
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01952 United States Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.57321 Uruguayan New Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 156.77469 Uzbekistan Sum
1 Philippine Peso = 0.19475 Venezuelan Bolivar
1 Philippine Peso = 443.49862 Vietnam Dong
1 Philippine Peso = 2.03026 Vanuatu Vatu
1 Philippine Peso = 0.0495 Samoa Tala
1 Philippine Peso = 10.83639 CFA Franc (BEAC)
1 Philippine Peso = 0.05271 East Caribbean Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 10.75752 CFA Franc (BCEAO)
1 Philippine Peso = 1.96193 Pacific Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 4.87895 Yemen Riyal
1 Philippine Peso = 0.259 South African Rand
1 Philippine Peso = 101.31784 Zambian Kwacha
1 Philippine Peso = 7.0656 Zimbabwe dollar

Fiction

THIS columnist was talking to his mass comm class at the Polytechnic University of the Philippines recently on the news coverage of extra judicial killings.

It’s about time for listeners and viewers to exercise a close and fair discernment into the “facts” and fiction in the news, the latter being the menu of police accomplishment reports. And create a strong voice in social media against half-truths and fabrications which have left broadcast reporters in a dilemma as never before. Most are just taking in the obvious twists and biases of the endless killings hook, line and sinker. TV reporters could only supplant the videos of the staged encounters with the bullet-riddled suspects who fought it out with police with willful and studied speculations that can no longer be hindered that the police almost always had a hand. Most broadcast reporters now dwell only on the idea of justice, compassion and restoration but embracing and pursuing these truths are almost gone. Persistent and zealous reporting on TV and radio has yield nothing much that could lead to the arrest of masked vigilantes or the police in contrived fatal buy-busts. When needed to provide balance in news reports witnesses and relatives of the victims are nowhere to be found. Most have sworn themselves to secrecy to protect their lives and those of their loved ones. Their fear and the government’s patent disregard for their safety and protection have brought broadcast news reporting, especially on radio, to a new low. We no longer seek out the truthful details of the daily slaughter of defenseless civilians satisfied as we are with the “facts” of the stories after they had transpired. Ignoring the rule of law by those sworn to embrace it has become the fiction of the day. While the KBP has applied restrictions against the news coverages of criminal, radical and extremist groups it must now recognize that the forced restraint on news media by the PNP has turned into a new and real threat to our freedoms and way of life. 

The word war between President Duterte and CCP Founding Chairman Jose Maria Sison will continue to escalate and so will the NPA offensives in many areas. The latest attacks were the torching of heavy equipment in Surigao del Sur, the disarming of a vice-mayor in the province and, the ambush and killing of six policemen in Negros Oriental. As Duterte claims, the government has agreed to numerous concessions.

But the declaration and then extension of martial law was a crucial non-negotiable issue for the CPP/NPA/NDF. Duterte seemed to have abandoned the fact that the deeper stigma of martial law would never leave the consciousness of NPA cadres and their leaders in Ultretch and Oslo. Duterte himself may not be aware of the “dynamics” between hostile forces at the local level fueled by almost 50 years of armed conflict and vicious reprisals. And he has not done enough to seriously address the distrust for the scorned military and police which Duterte continued to heap with funding, rewards and benefits. But, the other side still craves for abundant privileges which it expected would match those provided, most especially, to the military.

Duterte’s failure to fully assess the situation in Marawi before sending in AFP troops for urban warfare was a clear indication of his incapacity to confront the essential issues in a major conflict. He must have forgotten that the NPAs have regarded Marcos and his dictatorship as one entity. And on the ground a powerful and well-equipped military is out to fulfill the wiles of a dictator, no less. But now, Sison may have reached the end of his rope with Duterte and his administration without admitting it. And why should he take to task the NPA rebels involved in the ambush of the convoy of the Presidential Security Group in North Cotabato that targetted the President himself, who after apparently acted upon his instructions? Duterte should not have abandoned too early his mistrust of the CPP/NPA whom he regarded as friends in Davao. He himself has been familiar with the deeper social and cultural roots of the regional and local conflicts but seemed stumped from a national level. Despite his once pious talk of reconciliation with leftist rebels Duterte‘s penchant for unbridled violence now extends to the NPAs.

More than just the cessation of political and military hostilities Duterte should develop an inhospitable, ardous but magnificent task of unifying the two forces as what Nelson Mandela accomplished triumphantly in South Africa.
Rating: 
No votes yet

Column of the Day

Radiation in Hiroshima and Nagasaki

By PHILIP S. CHUA | October 18,2017
‘Frequent handwashing and not touching the face (and those surfaces) are essential habits that significantly lower the risk of acquiring these infections.’

Opinion of the Day

Don’t forget the 604 kilos of shabu

By ELLEN TORDESILLAS | October 18, 2017
‘The 604 kilos of shabu passed through Customs without inspection because someone influential sponsored it.’