June 20, 2018, 3:15 am
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1 Philippine Peso = 0.06897 UAE Dirham
1 Philippine Peso = 2.04526 Albanian Lek
1 Philippine Peso = 0.03404 Neth Antilles Guilder
1 Philippine Peso = 0.52113 Argentine Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 0.02544 Australian Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.03343 Aruba Florin
1 Philippine Peso = 0.03756 Barbados Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 1.57728 Bangladesh Taka
1 Philippine Peso = 0.03184 Bulgarian Lev
1 Philippine Peso = 0.00709 Bahraini Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 32.88225 Burundi Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01878 Bermuda Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.02522 Brunei Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.12883 Bolivian Boliviano
1 Philippine Peso = 0.07009 Brazilian Real
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01878 Bahamian Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 1.277 Bhutan Ngultrum
1 Philippine Peso = 0.19573 Botswana Pula
1 Philippine Peso = 375.96244 Belarus Ruble
1 Philippine Peso = 0.03752 Belize Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.02494 Canadian Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01868 Swiss Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 12.01146 Chilean Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 0.12169 Chinese Yuan
1 Philippine Peso = 54.86948 Colombian Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 10.59718 Costa Rica Colon
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01878 Cuban Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 1.78854 Cape Verde Escudo
1 Philippine Peso = 0.41869 Czech Koruna
1 Philippine Peso = 3.33333 Djibouti Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 0.12088 Danish Krone
1 Philippine Peso = 0.93052 Dominican Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 2.20053 Algerian Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.25367 Estonian Kroon
1 Philippine Peso = 0.33502 Egyptian Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 0.51117 Ethiopian Birr
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01621 Euro
1 Philippine Peso = 0.03897 Fiji Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01426 Falkland Islands Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01425 British Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 0.08833 Ghanaian Cedi
1 Philippine Peso = 0.87962 Gambian Dalasi
1 Philippine Peso = 169.05164 Guinea Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 0.14052 Guatemala Quetzal
1 Philippine Peso = 3.88526 Guyana Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.14739 Hong Kong Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.44866 Honduras Lempira
1 Philippine Peso = 0.1197 Croatian Kuna
1 Philippine Peso = 1.23812 Haiti Gourde
1 Philippine Peso = 5.22103 Hungarian Forint
1 Philippine Peso = 261.46479 Indonesian Rupiah
1 Philippine Peso = 0.06819 Israeli Shekel
1 Philippine Peso = 1.27817 Indian Rupee
1 Philippine Peso = 22.23474 Iraqi Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 796.99531 Iran Rial
1 Philippine Peso = 2.05333 Iceland Krona
1 Philippine Peso = 2.4507 Jamaican Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01331 Jordanian Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 2.06607 Japanese Yen
1 Philippine Peso = 1.89577 Kenyan Shilling
1 Philippine Peso = 1.28255 Kyrgyzstan Som
1 Philippine Peso = 75.84601 Cambodia Riel
1 Philippine Peso = 7.92488 Comoros Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 16.90141 North Korean Won
1 Philippine Peso = 20.8492 Korean Won
1 Philippine Peso = 0.00568 Kuwaiti Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.0154 Cayman Islands Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 6.40488 Kazakhstan Tenge
1 Philippine Peso = 157.33333 Lao Kip
1 Philippine Peso = 28.26291 Lebanese Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 3.00282 Sri Lanka Rupee
1 Philippine Peso = 2.66254 Liberian Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.2584 Lesotho Loti
1 Philippine Peso = 0.05725 Lithuanian Lita
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01165 Latvian Lat
1 Philippine Peso = 0.02546 Libyan Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.17921 Moroccan Dirham
1 Philippine Peso = 0.31576 Moldovan Leu
1 Philippine Peso = 0.99324 Macedonian Denar
1 Philippine Peso = 25.69014 Myanmar Kyat
1 Philippine Peso = 45.33333 Mongolian Tugrik
1 Philippine Peso = 0.15181 Macau Pataca
1 Philippine Peso = 6.66667 Mauritania Ougulya
1 Philippine Peso = 0.65765 Mauritius Rupee
1 Philippine Peso = 0.29239 Maldives Rufiyaa
1 Philippine Peso = 13.39812 Malawi Kwacha
1 Philippine Peso = 0.3853 Mexican Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 0.07515 Malaysian Ringgit
1 Philippine Peso = 0.25797 Namibian Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 6.74178 Nigerian Naira
1 Philippine Peso = 0.59151 Nicaragua Cordoba
1 Philippine Peso = 0.15379 Norwegian Krone
1 Philippine Peso = 2.0385 Nepalese Rupee
1 Philippine Peso = 0.0272 New Zealand Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.00723 Omani Rial
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01878 Panama Balboa
1 Philippine Peso = 0.06164 Peruvian Nuevo Sol
1 Philippine Peso = 0.06142 Papua New Guinea Kina
1 Philippine Peso = 1 Philippine Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 2.28545 Pakistani Rupee
1 Philippine Peso = 0.06993 Polish Zloty
1 Philippine Peso = 106.70047 Paraguayan Guarani
1 Philippine Peso = 0.06835 Qatar Rial
1 Philippine Peso = 0.07565 Romanian New Leu
1 Philippine Peso = 1.1966 Russian Rouble
1 Philippine Peso = 15.95174 Rwanda Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 0.07042 Saudi Arabian Riyal
1 Philippine Peso = 0.14841 Solomon Islands Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.25277 Seychelles Rupee
1 Philippine Peso = 0.33719 Sudanese Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 0.16718 Swedish Krona
1 Philippine Peso = 0.02548 Singapore Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01426 St Helena Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 0.41701 Slovak Koruna
1 Philippine Peso = 149.29577 Sierra Leone Leone
1 Philippine Peso = 10.57277 Somali Shilling
1 Philippine Peso = 397.4216 Sao Tome Dobra
1 Philippine Peso = 0.16432 El Salvador Colon
1 Philippine Peso = 9.67099 Syrian Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 0.25817 Swaziland Lilageni
1 Philippine Peso = 0.61446 Thai Baht
1 Philippine Peso = 0.04845 Tunisian Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.04326 Tongan paʻanga
1 Philippine Peso = 0.08905 Turkish Lira
1 Philippine Peso = 0.12487 Trinidad Tobago Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.56648 Taiwan Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 42.59155 Tanzanian Shilling
1 Philippine Peso = 0.49596 Ukraine Hryvnia
1 Philippine Peso = 72.33803 Ugandan Shilling
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01878 United States Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.59211 Uruguayan New Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 147.69953 Uzbekistan Sum
1 Philippine Peso = 1498.59155 Venezuelan Bolivar
1 Philippine Peso = 429.12676 Vietnam Dong
1 Philippine Peso = 2.02911 Vanuatu Vatu
1 Philippine Peso = 0.04869 Samoa Tala
1 Philippine Peso = 10.62592 CFA Franc (BEAC)
1 Philippine Peso = 0.0507 East Caribbean Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 10.62592 CFA Franc (BCEAO)
1 Philippine Peso = 1.92432 Pacific Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 4.69202 Yemen Riyal
1 Philippine Peso = 0.25823 South African Rand
1 Philippine Peso = 97.4554 Zambian Kwacha
1 Philippine Peso = 6.79624 Zimbabwe dollar

The fall of CNN

In the Philippines, there’s less than half a handful of American news providers. A function of limited choices, most Filipinos know CNN (Cable News Network). 

Founded by philanthropist Robert Edward “Ted” Turner, CNN, the first 24-hour news network, created a name for itself from its coverage of the Persian Gulf War.

In the international sphere where it dominates, CNN has Christiane Amanpour, Richard Quest and Fareed Zakaria. For the mainstream American audiences, CNN had Larry King, already then an iconic figure on American radio.

As CNN matured it featured more opinionated and editorialized reporting. It hired Anderson Cooper who seemed to have incredible empathy with his interviewees. Replacing King, CNN hired Piers Morgan who had a following in the United Kingdom.

Unfortunately, the fit was wrong. King resonated with rural American markets, a significant segment comprised of “Forgotten Men.” Form and content-wise, Morgan’s smugness and arrogance turned audiences off. Total ratings likewise declined as Zakaria started focusing on domestic politics away from his expertise. These worsened when, for its US coverage, CNN started employing anchors whose biased commentaries preceded news reporting.

Note the numbers. Fact-checker service politifact.com scored 33 percent of CNN host Van Jones’s reporting as half true and 17 percent  false, while CNN anchorman Don Lemon scored 33 percent false.

What believability CNN still enjoys in Manila is, however, no longer shared in its own home-country. Disparagingly nicknamed the “counterfeit news network” by a growing population of critics, the network’s US edition has been discovering new depths whenever it has breaking news. 

Content bias and editorial bullheadedness are at the core. It would have been easy enough to justify CNN’s decline on the animosity between Liberals and Conservatives. But it isn’t just that.  MSNBC would be in the same rut. It isn’t. 

A study by the Shorenstein Center on Press, Politics and Public Policy at Harvard University and the Project for Excellence in Journalism, showed gross media bias by CNN with regard to Republicans and Democrats. The study showed “CNN programming tended to cast a negative light on Republican candidates by a margin of three-to-one. Four in 10 stories (41 percent) were clearly negative while just 14 percent  were positive and 46 percent were neutral.” 

That was in 2007. Bias was aggravated by unethical behavior. In 2016, a CNN contributor leaked to the Clinton campaign questions for a forthcoming CNN-sponsored debate. Including the repeated replaying of illegally obtained conversations and an instance of “scripted questions,” politifact.com scores CNN as 16 percent half true, 7 percent mostly false and 11 percent totally false.

In 2017, reprising its 2007 findings, the Harvard Kennedy School again found  CNN’s coverage of Donald Trump was 93 percent negative compared to Fox’s more balanced coverage of 52 percent to 48 percent, negative to positive ratio.

Add to bias and ethical questions frivolous content.

In its US edition CNN once focused lengthily on Trump’s manner of holding a cup of water. In another instance, CNN dedicated extended primetime panel discussions on Trump’s choice of snacks, concluding its debate with a diagnosis of dementia. They’ve likewise waxed philosophical on the social inequalities of serving the US president two scoops of ice cream instead of one. Recently, for three weeks now, bannered under “Breaking News,” Anderson Cooper spends obsessive hours interviewing a porn star, an ageing Playmate and their ambulance chasers.

It’s turned tabloid. The company has lost touch with mainstream America. Serious content is sidelined for sensationalism. In comparison, issues on Fox News Corp. focus on national security, trade relations, industrial output and jobs, tax relief and healthcare. For America’s mainstream “Forgotten Man” these are real concerns that do not need to be bannered to sell.

Fox, a conservative sine qua non, is neither threatened by peer nor competition. CNN cannot claim the same. It’s been topped by MSNBC. ABC, NBC and CBS are on its heels. Hence, its daily “Breaking News” on stupefying stories.

Ratings reflect the substantial difference in content between a lead network and one crashing.

On June 2017 covering the primetime slots from 6 p.m. to 11 p.m. under shows anchored by CNN’s Wolfgang Blitzer, Erin Burnett, Anderson Cooper and Don Lemon, CNN’s average hourly viewership was 835,000. For the same hours, under Fox’s Eric Baier, Martha MacCallum, Tucker Carlson and Sean Hannity, Fox’s was 2.432 million. 

The total day hourly average viewership among Fox, MSNBC and CNN was 1.77 million,  1.131 million, and 830,000, respectively. Fox tripled CNN in nearly all prime slots. MSNBC, a liberal network like CNN, is double.

Updating the data, during the first quarter of 2018, CNN’s ratings spiralled down nearly 20 percent for total day and 16 percent for primetime. CNN is devolving. MSNBC and Fox earned 1.8 million and 2.8 million more viewers respectively.

CNN’s apparent bullheaded obsession with an agenda alienated from its US constituency’s as opposed to the objective and unbiased reporting of facts founds its decline. At the core of all “fake news,” an insidious Pavlovian agenda subliminally imposed, denies audiences critical choices and analyses, mind-conditioning them towards a bias.

When constant, incessant and profuse, agenda-based content, however sensationalized, bears down on gullible and undiscerning weak minds. To a discerning audience, however, agenda-based reporting insults their intelligence. They react by tuning out. CNN’s fallen ratings show what issues matter to an evolved, intelligent and deeply vigilant American audience. 
Rating: 
Average: 4.5 (8 votes)

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