July 18, 2018, 5:07 am
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1 Philippine Peso = 0.06864 UAE Dirham
1 Philippine Peso = 2.00897 Albanian Lek
1 Philippine Peso = 0.03439 Neth Antilles Guilder
1 Philippine Peso = 0.50824 Argentine Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 0.02516 Australian Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.03326 Aruba Florin
1 Philippine Peso = 0.03738 Barbados Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 1.56345 Bangladesh Taka
1 Philippine Peso = 0.03139 Bulgarian Lev
1 Philippine Peso = 0.00707 Bahraini Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 32.72248 Burundi Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01869 Bermuda Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.02526 Brunei Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.1282 Bolivian Boliviano
1 Philippine Peso = 0.07195 Brazilian Real
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01869 Bahamian Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 1.282 Bhutan Ngultrum
1 Philippine Peso = 0.19138 Botswana Pula
1 Philippine Peso = 374.13568 Belarus Ruble
1 Philippine Peso = 0.03734 Belize Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.02459 Canadian Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01871 Swiss Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 12.14969 Chilean Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 0.12502 Chinese Yuan
1 Philippine Peso = 53.37133 Colombian Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 10.54401 Costa Rica Colon
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01869 Cuban Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 1.76603 Cape Verde Escudo
1 Philippine Peso = 0.4139 Czech Koruna
1 Philippine Peso = 3.31714 Djibouti Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 0.11919 Danish Krone
1 Philippine Peso = 0.92375 Dominican Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 2.19884 Algerian Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.25015 Estonian Kroon
1 Philippine Peso = 0.3334 Egyptian Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 0.51037 Ethiopian Birr
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01599 Euro
1 Philippine Peso = 0.03902 Fiji Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01411 Falkland Islands Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01412 British Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 0.08949 Ghanaian Cedi
1 Philippine Peso = 0.88526 Gambian Dalasi
1 Philippine Peso = 168.36105 Guinea Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 0.13998 Guatemala Quetzal
1 Philippine Peso = 3.87012 Guyana Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.14665 Hong Kong Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.44715 Honduras Lempira
1 Philippine Peso = 0.11858 Croatian Kuna
1 Philippine Peso = 1.25939 Haiti Gourde
1 Philippine Peso = 5.1596 Hungarian Forint
1 Philippine Peso = 268.604 Indonesian Rupiah
1 Philippine Peso = 0.06791 Israeli Shekel
1 Philippine Peso = 1.27993 Indian Rupee
1 Philippine Peso = 22.12671 Iraqi Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 807.13885 Iran Rial
1 Philippine Peso = 2.0015 Iceland Krona
1 Philippine Peso = 2.42478 Jamaican Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01324 Jordanian Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 2.09923 Japanese Yen
1 Philippine Peso = 1.87722 Kenyan Shilling
1 Philippine Peso = 1.27646 Kyrgyzstan Som
1 Philippine Peso = 75.63072 Cambodia Riel
1 Philippine Peso = 7.88806 Comoros Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 16.81929 North Korean Won
1 Philippine Peso = 21.08952 Korean Won
1 Philippine Peso = 0.00566 Kuwaiti Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01532 Cayman Islands Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 6.39993 Kazakhstan Tenge
1 Philippine Peso = 157.01738 Lao Kip
1 Philippine Peso = 28.13493 Lebanese Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 2.97982 Sri Lanka Rupee
1 Philippine Peso = 2.97197 Liberian Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.24762 Lesotho Loti
1 Philippine Peso = 0.05697 Lithuanian Lita
1 Philippine Peso = 0.0116 Latvian Lat
1 Philippine Peso = 0.02562 Libyan Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.17688 Moroccan Dirham
1 Philippine Peso = 0.31088 Moldovan Leu
1 Philippine Peso = 0.98075 Macedonian Denar
1 Philippine Peso = 26.55578 Myanmar Kyat
1 Philippine Peso = 45.74846 Mongolian Tugrik
1 Philippine Peso = 0.15104 Macau Pataca
1 Philippine Peso = 6.63427 Mauritania Ougulya
1 Philippine Peso = 0.6382 Mauritius Rupee
1 Philippine Peso = 0.29097 Maldives Rufiyaa
1 Philippine Peso = 13.33283 Malawi Kwacha
1 Philippine Peso = 0.35287 Mexican Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 0.07569 Malaysian Ringgit
1 Philippine Peso = 0.24767 Namibian Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 6.69034 Nigerian Naira
1 Philippine Peso = 0.58456 Nicaragua Cordoba
1 Philippine Peso = 0.15155 Norwegian Krone
1 Philippine Peso = 2.04691 Nepalese Rupee
1 Philippine Peso = 0.02764 New Zealand Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.00719 Omani Rial
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01869 Panama Balboa
1 Philippine Peso = 0.06103 Peruvian Nuevo Sol
1 Philippine Peso = 0.06077 Papua New Guinea Kina
1 Philippine Peso = 1 Philippine Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 2.27135 Pakistani Rupee
1 Philippine Peso = 0.06898 Polish Zloty
1 Philippine Peso = 106.5969 Paraguayan Guarani
1 Philippine Peso = 0.06802 Qatar Rial
1 Philippine Peso = 0.07424 Romanian New Leu
1 Philippine Peso = 1.1686 Russian Rouble
1 Philippine Peso = 15.92992 Rwanda Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 0.07008 Saudi Arabian Riyal
1 Philippine Peso = 0.14699 Solomon Islands Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.25089 Seychelles Rupee
1 Philippine Peso = 0.33555 Sudanese Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 0.16567 Swedish Krona
1 Philippine Peso = 0.02551 Singapore Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01412 St Helena Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 0.41499 Slovak Koruna
1 Philippine Peso = 153.24238 Sierra Leone Leone
1 Philippine Peso = 10.65221 Somali Shilling
1 Philippine Peso = 391.8333 Sao Tome Dobra
1 Philippine Peso = 0.16352 El Salvador Colon
1 Philippine Peso = 9.624 Syrian Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 0.24803 Swaziland Lilageni
1 Philippine Peso = 0.62213 Thai Baht
1 Philippine Peso = 0.04953 Tunisian Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.04334 Tongan paʻanga
1 Philippine Peso = 0.09042 Turkish Lira
1 Philippine Peso = 0.12621 Trinidad Tobago Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.57118 Taiwan Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 42.3846 Tanzanian Shilling
1 Philippine Peso = 0.48981 Ukraine Hryvnia
1 Philippine Peso = 69.93085 Ugandan Shilling
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01869 United States Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.58568 Uruguayan New Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 145.44945 Uzbekistan Sum
1 Philippine Peso = 2236.96505 Venezuelan Bolivar
1 Philippine Peso = 430.74192 Vietnam Dong
1 Philippine Peso = 2.06036 Vanuatu Vatu
1 Philippine Peso = 0.04858 Samoa Tala
1 Philippine Peso = 10.48103 CFA Franc (BEAC)
1 Philippine Peso = 0.05046 East Caribbean Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 10.48103 CFA Franc (BCEAO)
1 Philippine Peso = 1.90563 Pacific Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 4.66922 Yemen Riyal
1 Philippine Peso = 0.24782 South African Rand
1 Philippine Peso = 96.98187 Zambian Kwacha
1 Philippine Peso = 6.76322 Zimbabwe dollar

Electricity and farm tourism

More on your electric bill: The systems loss of 6.47 percent being publicized by Meralco is the average for all its customers. It is being tolerated by the ERC. The law says the limit should be 8.5 percent. Your consumer group Matuwid na Singil sa Kuryente Consumer Alliance, Inc., MSK, had filed a petition asking ERC to enforce the 8.5 percent for all customers, not average. 

We believe the numbers also show that Meralco charges industrial customers lower for distribution, metering, and supply. 

Being the same as Singapore in 30 percent of the user base is not good enough. Our economic rivals are Thailand, Malaysia, Vietnam. And we are at a big disadvantage against them in the critical power production cost. Sadly, it does not need to be this way. Someone in the government especially the ERC just needs to move for the consumers. 

When will that happen? We continue to hope. That’s all we have for now.

For other power-related, energy & electricity updates, follow us on Twitter @PHPowerInsights and like us on Facebook at facebook.com/ matuwidnasingil.

David Tan <davidcelestratan@gmail.com> writes to tell us that the MSK official website has a new post titled “Comparing Philippines Electricity Rates vs Asean - Just the Facts.”

Summary of the post is as follows: Most Filipino consumers know that every month their electricity bills take a significant part of their budget. And he better pay up or his lights will be cut off. 

Recently some reports are headlined that Philippine power rates are the same as Singapore, as if that should be a consolation [considering the buying power of the Singapore pay scale compared to the low buying power of the Philippine peso]. 

So let us just get to the facts. What is the truth? 

In the industrial sector, the Philippines is the highest in Asean together with Singapore at P5.84 per kwh. Thailand is lower by 8 percent, P5.37; Malaysia by 19.35 percent, P4.71; Indonesia by an enviable 71.58 percent, P1.66 per kwh. 

For commercial customers, the Philippine rate for 2015 was P7.49 per kwh. Singapore was 3 percent lower: P7.24. Thailand 38 percent, P5.07; Malaysia 32.36 percent, P4.64; and Indonesia by a whopping 71.30 percent lower, paying P2.13.

For residential customers, the Philippine rate is the highest at P8.90 per kwh. Singapore is lower by 18.32 percent, P6.69; Thailand by 38 percent, P5.52; Malaysia by 32.36 percent, P6.02; and Indonesia at 85.51 percent, P1.29 per kwh. 

***

After medical tourism, SEARCA in Los Baños tells us that farm tourism will open up new perspectives for inclusive and sustainable agricultural and rural development (ISARD) and will revitalize the farm tourism sector as a sunrise industry in the Philippines and Southeast Asia.

Dr. Gil C. Saguiguit, Jr., director of the Southeast Asian Regional Center for Graduate Study and Research in Agriculture (SEARCA), said farm or agriculture tourism diversifies income for small farmers while promoting sustainable agricultural systems and community involvement.

He also disclosed that Sen. Cynthia Villar is pushing for the signing into law of the Farm Tourism Development Act. It effectively institutionalizes the Philippine government’s farm tourism programs in helping raise farmers’ incomes and increase players in the rural tourism industry.

SEARCA has a five-day exposure workshop on Farm Tourism Practices designed for different stakeholders to learn and adopt trends in farm tourism across Southeast Asia.

It received participants from Cambodia, Indonesia, Philippines, Thailand, Timor Leste, and Vietnam – plus Taiwan represented by a resource person.

The workshop also showcases agriculture as a productive business endeavor and an exciting field of study among young people.

In a similar effort to boost agri tourism, the Southeast Asian AgriMuseum and Learning Center in Agricultural and Rural Development will, in the future, offer this farm tourism workshop, according to Saguiguit.

“These initiatives will place agriculture and the exciting prospects it has to offer centerstage. This is towards greater appreciation of agriculture not just for the youth in their career choices, but also for other important sectors and the general public,” he said.

The workshop is in partnership with the Department of Tourism (DOT) and International School of Sustainable Tourism (ISST) which SEARCA has tapped as knowledge partners.

“These two institutions have been very busy making great progress in advancing farm tourism in the Philippines, along with partner agencies like the Agricultural Training Institute of the Department of Agriculture (DA-ATI), Technical Education and Skills Development Authority (TESDA), and Department of Trade and Industry, with the active engagement of farm tourism operators,” said Saguiguit.

In 2012, SEARCA spearheaded the First Philippine National Agri tourism Research Conference that aimed to identify research gaps and policies that can help develop agri tourism in the country.

The exposure-workshop features presentations led by ISST President and former Tourism Secretary Dr. Mina T. Gabor, on global and regional trends in farm tourism; followed by presentations by experts from the University of the Philippines Los Baños, DOT, Maejo University in Chiang Mai, Thailand, Chung Hsing University in Taiwan, various leaders and chief executive officers in farm tourism practice in the Philippines and in Thailand, Central Bicol State University of Agriculture, and agriculture consultants.

Details about the workshop and its programs are found at http://bit.ly/farm-tourism-wshop-2017.

The learning event is organized by SEARCA’s Training Unit under its Knowledge Management Department, reported SEARCA Knowledge Management Head Maria Celeste H. Cadiz. (Growth Publishing for SEARCA. For further information, please contact 0929-715-8669, 0917-102-6734 (Growth Publishing for SEARCA).

***

Dahliaspillera@yahoo.com
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Column of the Day

Tearing down the house (Second of a series)

Jego Ragragio's picture
By Jego Ragragio | July 18,2018
‘The draft Federal Constitution is a clear example of tearing a house down in order to install a new door—where the new door goes into an existing door jamb. There’s barely anything new here, and the few things that are new, don’t actually need a constitutional amendment.’

Opinion of the Day

Heed this constitutional expert’s warning

Ellen Tordesillas's picture
By ELLEN TORDESILLAS | July 18, 2018
‘The critique of Gene Lacza Pilapil, assistant professor of Political Science at the University of the Philippines-Diliman, one of the resource persons, should warn us about the draft Federal Constitution produced by the Duterte-created Consultative Committee.’