September 22, 2017, 6:00 pm
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1 Philippine Peso = 0.07205 UAE Dirham
1 Philippine Peso = 2.19737 Albanian Lek
1 Philippine Peso = 0.03473 Neth Antilles Guilder
1 Philippine Peso = 0.33883 Argentine Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 0.02472 Australian Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.03508 Aruba Florin
1 Philippine Peso = 0.03924 Barbados Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 1.60624 Bangladesh Taka
1 Philippine Peso = 0.03223 Bulgarian Lev
1 Philippine Peso = 0.0074 Bahraini Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 34.03414 Burundi Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01962 Bermuda Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.02647 Brunei Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.13537 Bolivian Boliviano
1 Philippine Peso = 0.06149 Brazilian Real
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01962 Bahamian Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 1.26104 Bhutan Ngultrum
1 Philippine Peso = 0.20051 Botswana Pula
1 Philippine Peso = 392.78006 Belarus Ruble
1 Philippine Peso = 0.03919 Belize Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.02419 Canadian Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01905 Swiss Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 12.25231 Chilean Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 0.12921 Chinese Yuan
1 Philippine Peso = 57.14342 Colombian Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 11.22072 Costa Rica Colon
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01962 Cuban Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 1.81263 Cape Verde Escudo
1 Philippine Peso = 0.42857 Czech Koruna
1 Philippine Peso = 3.49225 Djibouti Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 0.12231 Danish Krone
1 Philippine Peso = 0.92211 Dominican Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 2.19774 Algerian Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.25715 Estonian Kroon
1 Philippine Peso = 0.34589 Egyptian Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 0.45831 Ethiopian Birr
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01644 Euro
1 Philippine Peso = 0.03953 Fiji Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01454 Falkland Islands Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01447 British Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 0.08679 Ghanaian Cedi
1 Philippine Peso = 0.87895 Gambian Dalasi
1 Philippine Peso = 174.63213 Guinea Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 0.14311 Guatemala Quetzal
1 Philippine Peso = 3.97705 Guyana Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.15314 Hong Kong Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.45756 Honduras Lempira
1 Philippine Peso = 0.12286 Croatian Kuna
1 Philippine Peso = 1.19973 Haiti Gourde
1 Philippine Peso = 5.08986 Hungarian Forint
1 Philippine Peso = 260.48656 Indonesian Rupiah
1 Philippine Peso = 0.0688 Israeli Shekel
1 Philippine Peso = 1.27132 Indian Rupee
1 Philippine Peso = 22.89582 Iraqi Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 658.62271 Iran Rial
1 Philippine Peso = 2.10712 Iceland Krona
1 Philippine Peso = 2.56229 Jamaican Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01388 Jordanian Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 2.20489 Japanese Yen
1 Philippine Peso = 2.02178 Kenyan Shilling
1 Philippine Peso = 1.3433 Kyrgyzstan Som
1 Philippine Peso = 79.4585 Cambodia Riel
1 Philippine Peso = 8.05435 Comoros Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 17.65745 North Korean Won
1 Philippine Peso = 22.18972 Korean Won
1 Philippine Peso = 0.00592 Kuwaiti Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01609 Cayman Islands Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 6.67785 Kazakhstan Tenge
1 Philippine Peso = 162.84088 Lao Kip
1 Philippine Peso = 29.53698 Lebanese Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 2.99588 Sri Lanka Rupee
1 Philippine Peso = 2.29351 Liberian Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.26015 Lesotho Loti
1 Philippine Peso = 0.05981 Lithuanian Lita
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01217 Latvian Lat
1 Philippine Peso = 0.02654 Libyan Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.18329 Moroccan Dirham
1 Philippine Peso = 0.34501 Moldovan Leu
1 Philippine Peso = 1.00647 Macedonian Denar
1 Philippine Peso = 26.68236 Myanmar Kyat
1 Philippine Peso = 48.14597 Mongolian Tugrik
1 Philippine Peso = 0.15773 Macau Pataca
1 Philippine Peso = 7.0826 Mauritania Ougulya
1 Philippine Peso = 0.65097 Mauritius Rupee
1 Philippine Peso = 0.30135 Maldives Rufiyaa
1 Philippine Peso = 14.05376 Malawi Kwacha
1 Philippine Peso = 0.34969 Mexican Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 0.08232 Malaysian Ringgit
1 Philippine Peso = 0.2598 Namibian Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 6.92564 Nigerian Naira
1 Philippine Peso = 0.58623 Nicaragua Cordoba
1 Philippine Peso = 0.15332 Norwegian Krone
1 Philippine Peso = 2.01197 Nepalese Rupee
1 Philippine Peso = 0.02683 New Zealand Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.00755 Omani Rial
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01962 Panama Balboa
1 Philippine Peso = 0.06369 Peruvian Nuevo Sol
1 Philippine Peso = 0.06268 Papua New Guinea Kina
1 Philippine Peso = 1 Philippine Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 2.06494 Pakistani Rupee
1 Philippine Peso = 0.07028 Polish Zloty
1 Philippine Peso = 111.25171 Paraguayan Guarani
1 Philippine Peso = 0.07269 Qatar Rial
1 Philippine Peso = 0.0755 Romanian New Leu
1 Philippine Peso = 1.13354 Russian Rouble
1 Philippine Peso = 16.2576 Rwanda Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 0.07357 Saudi Arabian Riyal
1 Philippine Peso = 0.15204 Solomon Islands Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.2669 Seychelles Rupee
1 Philippine Peso = 0.13067 Sudanese Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 0.15655 Swedish Krona
1 Philippine Peso = 0.02649 Singapore Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01455 St Helena Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 0.43567 Slovak Koruna
1 Philippine Peso = 147.14538 Sierra Leone Leone
1 Philippine Peso = 10.928 Somali Shilling
1 Philippine Peso = 402.77613 Sao Tome Dobra
1 Philippine Peso = 0.17167 El Salvador Colon
1 Philippine Peso = 10.10359 Syrian Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 0.2598 Swaziland Lilageni
1 Philippine Peso = 0.64921 Thai Baht
1 Philippine Peso = 0.04791 Tunisian Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.0432 Tongan paʻanga
1 Philippine Peso = 0.06876 Turkish Lira
1 Philippine Peso = 0.13239 Trinidad Tobago Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.59217 Taiwan Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 43.90818 Tanzanian Shilling
1 Philippine Peso = 0.51422 Ukraine Hryvnia
1 Philippine Peso = 70.57092 Ugandan Shilling
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01962 United States Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.56582 Uruguayan New Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 158.34804 Uzbekistan Sum
1 Philippine Peso = 0.19569 Venezuelan Bolivar
1 Philippine Peso = 445.73278 Vietnam Dong
1 Philippine Peso = 2.0155 Vanuatu Vatu
1 Philippine Peso = 0.04907 Samoa Tala
1 Philippine Peso = 10.773 CFA Franc (BEAC)
1 Philippine Peso = 0.05297 East Caribbean Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 10.75142 CFA Franc (BCEAO)
1 Philippine Peso = 1.95017 Pacific Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 4.90386 Yemen Riyal
1 Philippine Peso = 0.25991 South African Rand
1 Philippine Peso = 101.81479 Zambian Kwacha
1 Philippine Peso = 7.10025 Zimbabwe dollar

The dreaded DDS

EVERY president has been accused, at one point or another, of having double standards. Whether it be in favor of friends, family, allies or those who work for him, high officials in government have encountered this allegation, rightly or wrongly. To some extent, President Duterte
was chosen by some of his voters in the belief that he would balance the scales in favor of the ordinary Filipino, convinced by his scathing monologues against traditional politicians and their oligarch allies.

More than a year into his presidency, it seems that the same fate has befallen Mr. Duterte. The acronym DDS, infamous for the Davao Death Squad and embraced by Mr. Duterte’s supporters as their monicker for themselves, is taking on another meaning: Duterte Double Standard.

It his highlighted by the appearance of Vice Mayor Paolo Duterte and Atty. Manases Carpio (the husband of Davao City Mayor Sara Duterte) at the Senate Blue Ribbon Committee hearing on the Php6.4 billion drug shipment that slipped past the Bureau of Customs last May.

Strategists for the Palace along the Pasig River probably concluded that a mere appearance by the President’s family members would satisfy the public clamor to have them answer questions about their alleged relationship with customs fixers. After all, the president who signed an executive order putting into motion the freedom of information mechanism for the executive branch could barely afford to be perceived as protecting those close to him. However, there was one thing worse than snubbing a Senate hearing: appearing and refusing to answer simple questions.

The way the younger Duterte was handled by majority of the senators present showed a stark contrast from previous resource persons that appeared before them. Polong, as he is known in Davao, was unable to adopt the humble persona masterfully wielded by his father. Game face on, he dismissed questions from senators, at several instances even refusing to answer them; at one point, he verbalized his disgust at being questioned repeatedly. Unfortunately for him, Senator Trillanes had already trapped him into unwittingly answering a seemingly innocuous question: the vice mayor admitted he had a tattoo on his back, which according to Trillanes, was proof that Polong was a member of the Chinese triad. Even the normally volcanic Dick Gordon was meek as a lamb when it came to fielding questions for the younger Duterte, deftly maneuvering him away from further skirmishes with Trillanes.

The tune of the Palace has changed when it comes to allegations against Polong. Previously, President Duterte was adamant that he would relinquish his post if even “a whiff of corruption” was raised in connection with his children. His spokesperson now defends Polong vigorously, saying that whomever accuses the vice mayor should be prepared to present credible evidence of their claims. Whatever happened to a whiff? Gone with the wind, like many of their previous promises. Former DILG Secretary Ismael Sueño, who was fired for allegations brought against him by his undersecretaries, must be cringing at these developments, given his quick dismissal without the benefit of pleading his case before the audience of one.

Polong’s appearance at the Senate, surrounded by his lawyers and allies, juxtaposed with the murder photos of teenagers Kian delos Santos and Carl Arnaiz, paint a stark but jarring contrast between the privileged and the ordinary in light of the war on drugs. The two boys, killed in anti-drug operations, were mercilessly gunned down by policemen. No fancy lawyers, no protective allies, no benefit of defending themselves alive. Worse, their supposed links to drugs are being bandied about to justify their deaths, “intel” sourced by your PNP from....Facebook.

Meanwhile, no big-time drug supplier has been the subject of these anti-illegal drug operations, and exclusive villages and clubs are still immune to Tokhang operations.

More proof of this double standard is how President Duterte has treated the Marcos family, beginning with his decision to allow the burial of the late dictator Ferdinand Marcos in the Libingan ng mga Bayani. Some had hoped that Duterte’s debt of gratitude had already been paid with the burial, but it seems that the tab just keeps getting longer and longer. Declaring September 11, Marcos’ birth anniversary as a holiday even in Ilocos Norte is a slap on the faces of the thousands of martial law victims, the very people that the State is seeking to do right by under the Human Rights Victims Reparations and Recognition Act of 2013.

Of course, the elder Duterte sees nothing wrong with granting the Marcos family’s request for the local holiday. After all, he said, Marcos is a hero to the Ilocanos. I doubt that Hitler’s hometown holds any commemoration of his birth, as with the other hometowns of the other despots.

While on this side of the world, the dictator’s family is allowed to throw a private party for hundreds inside public property, complete with members of the Army and the PNP as their guard.

As icing on their cake, the NHCP was present at the unveiling of a statue of Marcos in Batac, with daughter Imee Marcos joyfully proclaiming that “history is not done indeed with Ferdinand Marcos.” As the old adage goes, be careful what you wish for, Governor. You still might live to see the day that statue is torn down, suffering the same fate as the confederate monuments in the United States.

From erring assistant secretaries openly flouting government prohibitions, to members of the First Family continuing to enjoy the protection of their father’s power and position, to old allies benefitting from a whitewashing of history, it seems that the 16 million voters who voted for change are certainly getting the short end of the stick. Unfortunately, it is not just the 16 million who are left holding the bag; the rest of the nation is right up there with them.
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Column of the Day

Barbaric fraternities (2)

By DAHLI ASPILLERA | September 22,2017
‘An added crime of the guilty is their scheme to plant the death of Atio to the police tokhang. Only asinine paranoid oppositionists believe all sidewalk killings are the Administration’s.’

Opinion of the Day

Conspiracy

By DODY LACUNA | September 22, 2017
‘Of course, the dean of the UST Faculty of Civil Law knew hazing was taking place.’