April 29, 2017, 11:39 am
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1 Philippine Peso = 0.07338 UAE Dirham
1 Philippine Peso = 2.47153 Albanian Lek
1 Philippine Peso = 0.03551 Neth Antilles Guilder
1 Philippine Peso = 0.30767 Argentine Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 0.0267 Australian Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.03576 Aruba Florin
1 Philippine Peso = 0.03996 Barbados Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 1.62058 Bangladesh Taka
1 Philippine Peso = 0.03591 Bulgarian Lev
1 Philippine Peso = 0.00753 Bahraini Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 33.97123 Burundi Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01998 Bermuda Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.02787 Brunei Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.13766 Bolivian Boliviano
1 Philippine Peso = 0.06313 Brazilian Real
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01998 Bahamian Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 1.28122 Bhutan Ngultrum
1 Philippine Peso = 0.20824 Botswana Pula
1 Philippine Peso = 400.00001 Belarus Ruble
1 Philippine Peso = 0.03992 Belize Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.02724 Canadian Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01979 Swiss Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 13.24575 Chilean Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 0.13775 Chinese Yuan
1 Philippine Peso = 58.71728 Colombian Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 11.01139 Costa Rica Colon
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01998 Cuban Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 2.01439 Cape Verde Escudo
1 Philippine Peso = 0.49203 Czech Koruna
1 Philippine Peso = 3.51329 Djibouti Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 0.13587 Danish Krone
1 Philippine Peso = 0.94126 Dominican Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 2.18054 Algerian Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.28573 Estonian Kroon
1 Philippine Peso = 0.36064 Egyptian Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 0.45667 Ethiopian Birr
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01826 Euro
1 Philippine Peso = 0.04187 Fiji Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01546 Falkland Islands Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01544 British Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 0.08339 Ghanaian Cedi
1 Philippine Peso = 0.88012 Gambian Dalasi
1 Philippine Peso = 183.86813 Guinea Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 0.14668 Guatemala Quetzal
1 Philippine Peso = 4.08292 Guyana Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.1554 Hong Kong Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.46693 Honduras Lempira
1 Philippine Peso = 0.13577 Croatian Kuna
1 Philippine Peso = 1.35684 Haiti Gourde
1 Philippine Peso = 5.7015 Hungarian Forint
1 Philippine Peso = 266.45355 Indonesian Rupiah
1 Philippine Peso = 0.07222 Israeli Shekel
1 Philippine Peso = 1.28482 Indian Rupee
1 Philippine Peso = 23.5964 Iraqi Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 648.13188 Iran Rial
1 Philippine Peso = 2.12587 Iceland Krona
1 Philippine Peso = 2.56723 Jamaican Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01416 Jordanian Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 2.22689 Japanese Yen
1 Philippine Peso = 2.05694 Kenyan Shilling
1 Philippine Peso = 1.34302 Kyrgyzstan Som
1 Philippine Peso = 80.01199 Cambodia Riel
1 Philippine Peso = 9.22717 Comoros Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 17.98202 North Korean Won
1 Philippine Peso = 22.74046 Korean Won
1 Philippine Peso = 0.00607 Kuwaiti Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01638 Cayman Islands Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 6.28332 Kazakhstan Tenge
1 Philippine Peso = 163.51649 Lao Kip
1 Philippine Peso = 30.09391 Lebanese Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 3.03696 Sri Lanka Rupee
1 Philippine Peso = 1.81818 Liberian Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.26693 Lesotho Loti
1 Philippine Peso = 0.06091 Lithuanian Lita
1 Philippine Peso = 0.0124 Latvian Lat
1 Philippine Peso = 0.02813 Libyan Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.1977 Moroccan Dirham
1 Philippine Peso = 0.38132 Moldovan Leu
1 Philippine Peso = 1.11848 Macedonian Denar
1 Philippine Peso = 27.13287 Myanmar Kyat
1 Philippine Peso = 48.19181 Mongolian Tugrik
1 Philippine Peso = 0.16005 Macau Pataca
1 Philippine Peso = 7.13467 Mauritania Ougulya
1 Philippine Peso = 0.69331 Mauritius Rupee
1 Philippine Peso = 0.30689 Maldives Rufiyaa
1 Philippine Peso = 14.34486 Malawi Kwacha
1 Philippine Peso = 0.38017 Mexican Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 0.08672 Malaysian Ringgit
1 Philippine Peso = 0.26573 Namibian Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 6.28372 Nigerian Naira
1 Philippine Peso = 0.59521 Nicaragua Cordoba
1 Philippine Peso = 0.17029 Norwegian Krone
1 Philippine Peso = 2.03996 Nepalese Rupee
1 Philippine Peso = 0.02907 New Zealand Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.00769 Omani Rial
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01998 Panama Balboa
1 Philippine Peso = 0.06481 Peruvian Nuevo Sol
1 Philippine Peso = 0.06333 Papua New Guinea Kina
1 Philippine Peso = 1 Philippine Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 2.09251 Pakistani Rupee
1 Philippine Peso = 0.07709 Polish Zloty
1 Philippine Peso = 111.06893 Paraguayan Guarani
1 Philippine Peso = 0.07275 Qatar Rial
1 Philippine Peso = 0.08271 Romanian New Leu
1 Philippine Peso = 1.1388 Russian Rouble
1 Philippine Peso = 16.36144 Rwanda Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 0.07493 Saudi Arabian Riyal
1 Philippine Peso = 0.15666 Solomon Islands Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.27063 Seychelles Rupee
1 Philippine Peso = 0.13306 Sudanese Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 0.17603 Swedish Krona
1 Philippine Peso = 0.02788 Singapore Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01547 St Helena Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 0.44368 Slovak Koruna
1 Philippine Peso = 148.85115 Sierra Leone Leone
1 Philippine Peso = 10.96903 Somali Shilling
1 Philippine Peso = 447.57244 Sao Tome Dobra
1 Philippine Peso = 0.17427 El Salvador Colon
1 Philippine Peso = 10.28931 Syrian Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 0.26494 Swaziland Lilageni
1 Philippine Peso = 0.69131 Thai Baht
1 Philippine Peso = 0.04823 Tunisian Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.04623 Tongan paʻanga
1 Philippine Peso = 0.07099 Turkish Lira
1 Philippine Peso = 0.13406 Trinidad Tobago Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.60376 Taiwan Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 44.53547 Tanzanian Shilling
1 Philippine Peso = 0.52997 Ukraine Hryvnia
1 Philippine Peso = 72.76723 Ugandan Shilling
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01998 United States Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.56084 Uruguayan New Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 73.94606 Uzbekistan Sum
1 Philippine Peso = 0.19929 Venezuelan Bolivar
1 Philippine Peso = 454.32568 Vietnam Dong
1 Philippine Peso = 2.15265 Vanuatu Vatu
1 Philippine Peso = 0.05182 Samoa Tala
1 Philippine Peso = 11.97263 CFA Franc (BEAC)
1 Philippine Peso = 0.05395 East Caribbean Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 12 CFA Franc (BCEAO)
1 Philippine Peso = 2.17123 Pacific Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 4.99201 Yemen Riyal
1 Philippine Peso = 0.26515 South African Rand
1 Philippine Peso = 103.68632 Zambian Kwacha
1 Philippine Peso = 7.23077 Zimbabwe dollar

Dosage controversy

THERE have been controversies about the safe dose for our intake of calcium, Vitamin D, and sodium (salt). Obviously, the amount we take of any substance or medications, either too high or too low, is important, when it comes to efficacy, benefit, and adverse side-effects.

Calcium and Vitamin D
In October 2016, a new guideline was published stating that Calcium and Vitamin D intake “does not adversely affect cardiovascular health” as was suspected a decade ago.

Based on a meta-analysis published in the Annals of Internal Medicine, the National Osteoporosis Foundation and the American Society for Preventive Cardiology “have determined that calcium in food or supplements (and even with the addition of Vitamin D), doesn’t have an effect on incident cardiovascular or cerebrovascular disease, disease-related mortality, or all-cause mortality in most healthy adults.”

Total consumption of less than 2000-2500 mg daily “should be considered safe from a cardiovascular standpoint,” according to this group. However, most individuals do not need more than 500 mg of supplemental calcium a day, which could even be provided by a regular diet. Vitamin D, in its D3 form, is recommended as essential in this study and the dosages stated are 600 IU/d for those up to age 70 and 800 IU/d for those older.

The caveat is, when it comes to food or medications, more is not necessarily better.

Sodium – Salt
When it comes to sodium (salt), more is definitely not better. As a matter of fact, excessive salt intake has an adverse side effects on the cardiovascular system. Those with hypertension (high blood pressure) and those with heart failure almost instantly experience the ill effects of eating foods that are too salty, anything more than the prescribed “low salt diet.” The blood pressure immediately goes up among hypertensives and those with heart failure soon develop shortness of breath and leg swelling, depending on the degree of cardiac failure.

An article in the October 3, 2016 issue of the Journal of American College of Cardiology reported that a study covering more than two decades shows that those with the lowest sodium (salt) intake have the lowest rate of mortality (death).

The controversy with regards to sodium was not how bad excess sodium was, since it has always been clear that too much salt was bad for practically everyone, not only for those with cardiovascular diseases. The question was what the safe lowest salt intake was. 

The new finding in this study by Dr. Nancy R. Cook and her partners at Brigham and Women’s Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, debunked the previous studies that reported people who consumed the lowest amount of sodium had increased mortality, or had no increased risk at all.

The study shows that “for every added 1000 mg/day of sodium (the equivalent of about a half-teaspoon per day), the risk of premature death went up by 12%. And that’s only for an excess of about half a teaspoon! A lot of salt “addicts” consume greater excesses than that, oblivious that this is most unhealthy.

The details of the study: “Cook and colleagues calculated mortality over 24 years for the patients in phase 1 (1987–1990) and phase 2 (1990–1995) of the Trials of Hypertension Prevention (TOHP), which analyzed the effect of sodium-reduction interventions on all-cause mortality based on multiple 24-hour urine samples from prehypertensive adults ages 30 to 54 years old. They found no disadvantage to ingesting the lowest levels of sodium, as reflected by 24-hour urinary sodium excretion, and a direct linear association between average sodium intake and mortality.”

The current guidelines from the US Food and Drug Administration is below 2300 mg a day, or roughly less than 2 teaspoons a day.

Food labels on cans and bottles provide, among other ingredients, the sodium content, and one can precisely tell the amount of salt in each. The guesswork comes with regards to home cooked food, unless the cook is vigilant, conscious, and careful in the use of table salt or other spices and additives that also contain salt. Many restaurants today are also showing on their menus nutritional facts, including amounts of calories, proteins, total fats, cholesterol, carbohydrates, and sodium, which helps. And their chefs also accept request for low salt, no MSG, less sugar, and less spices, or putting the sauces on the side on food orders.

So, before adding salt to your food, think of health and longevity. Indeed, salt shaker is out and sodium counting is in.

Vitamin-mineral supplements
If you are eating properly every day, you are just wasting your money taking multivitamin-mineral supplements, according to experts.

Three studies published three years ago in the journal Annals of Internal Medicine, found that multivitamins and minerals supplements “did not work any better than placebo.”

The report says these supplements would not boost the immune system or provide added health benefits, like preventing heart disease or memory loss, or enhancing longevity. to those who are eating properly daily and suggests abandoning their use. 

Only the multibillion-dollar multivitamin-mineral industry benefits, especially from those who take meg-dose supplements, which have been deemed detrimental to health and have resulted in deaths. There are also doubts that most of these and other food supplements on the market (pills, potions, and lotions) may not have the proper and right amount or quality ingredients in them. Not to mention the side effects from them that could take years to show.

Dr. Eliseo Guallar, a professor of epidemiology at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, stated that “it’s clear that vitamins are not working.” 

The studies did not show that multivitamins and minerals cause any adverse health effects, except when they are taken in a megadose (overdose) manner. Those below age 60 who are healthy and eating well may not need multivitamins, minerals, or any supplements. 

For the elderly and those who do not eat properly or adequately, multivitamins and minerals would be beneficial, taken at the recommended dosage. Be sure to discuss your concerns with your physician.

The main objective of this column is to educate and inspire people, especially parents, whose way of life inevitably impacts the health of their children, to live a healthy lifestyle to prevent illnesses and disabilities, and achieve a happier and more productive life for themselves and for their offspring. My articles are general medical information for the public and not intended to be applicable to, or appropriate for, anyone. The data, statistics, and personal commentaries presented here are not a substitute for, or inferred to be superior to, the professional opinion and recommendation of your physician, who knows your total condition well and who is your best ally when it comes to your health. 

***

For more data, please visit philipSchua.com

Email: scalpelpen@gmail.com
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