February 26, 2018, 5:32 am
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1 Philippine Peso = 0.0709 UAE Dirham
1 Philippine Peso = 2.0666 Albanian Lek
1 Philippine Peso = 0.03436 Neth Antilles Guilder
1 Philippine Peso = 0.38512 Argentine Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 0.0246 Australian Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.03436 Aruba Florin
1 Philippine Peso = 0.03861 Barbados Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 1.59981 Bangladesh Taka
1 Philippine Peso = 0.0307 Bulgarian Lev
1 Philippine Peso = 0.00727 Bahraini Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 33.8027 Burundi Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01931 Bermuda Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.02544 Brunei Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.13243 Bolivian Boliviano
1 Philippine Peso = 0.06249 Brazilian Real
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01931 Bahamian Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 1.24035 Bhutan Ngultrum
1 Philippine Peso = 0.18341 Botswana Pula
1 Philippine Peso = 386.48649 Belarus Ruble
1 Philippine Peso = 0.03857 Belize Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.02437 Canadian Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01807 Swiss Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 11.38996 Chilean Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 0.12225 Chinese Yuan
1 Philippine Peso = 54.88417 Colombian Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 10.92317 Costa Rica Colon
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01931 Cuban Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 1.73147 Cape Verde Escudo
1 Philippine Peso = 0.39788 Czech Koruna
1 Philippine Peso = 3.41371 Djibouti Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 0.11689 Danish Krone
1 Philippine Peso = 0.94363 Dominican Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 2.19764 Algerian Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.24563 Estonian Kroon
1 Philippine Peso = 0.34054 Egyptian Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 0.5251 Ethiopian Birr
1 Philippine Peso = 0.0157 Euro
1 Philippine Peso = 0.03853 Fiji Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01381 Falkland Islands Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01382 British Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 0.08607 Ghanaian Cedi
1 Philippine Peso = 0.90347 Gambian Dalasi
1 Philippine Peso = 173.55213 Guinea Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 0.14162 Guatemala Quetzal
1 Philippine Peso = 3.93494 Guyana Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.15101 Hong Kong Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.45448 Honduras Lempira
1 Philippine Peso = 0.11653 Croatian Kuna
1 Philippine Peso = 1.23243 Haiti Gourde
1 Philippine Peso = 4.90965 Hungarian Forint
1 Philippine Peso = 263.76448 Indonesian Rupiah
1 Philippine Peso = 0.06723 Israeli Shekel
1 Philippine Peso = 1.25268 Indian Rupee
1 Philippine Peso = 22.85714 Iraqi Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 718.33978 Iran Rial
1 Philippine Peso = 1.93822 Iceland Krona
1 Philippine Peso = 2.4222 Jamaican Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01364 Jordanian Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 2.0617 Japanese Yen
1 Philippine Peso = 1.96236 Kenyan Shilling
1 Philippine Peso = 1.311 Kyrgyzstan Som
1 Philippine Peso = 76.94981 Cambodia Riel
1 Philippine Peso = 7.70077 Comoros Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 17.37452 North Korean Won
1 Philippine Peso = 20.76255 Korean Won
1 Philippine Peso = 0.00578 Kuwaiti Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01583 Cayman Islands Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 6.1749 Kazakhstan Tenge
1 Philippine Peso = 159.87839 Lao Kip
1 Philippine Peso = 29.06178 Lebanese Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 2.99421 Sri Lanka Rupee
1 Philippine Peso = 2.50386 Liberian Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.22268 Lesotho Loti
1 Philippine Peso = 0.05886 Lithuanian Lita
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01198 Latvian Lat
1 Philippine Peso = 0.0257 Libyan Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.1777 Moroccan Dirham
1 Philippine Peso = 0.32037 Moldovan Leu
1 Philippine Peso = 0.96332 Macedonian Denar
1 Philippine Peso = 25.79151 Myanmar Kyat
1 Philippine Peso = 46.1583 Mongolian Tugrik
1 Philippine Peso = 0.15547 Macau Pataca
1 Philippine Peso = 6.75676 Mauritania Ougulya
1 Philippine Peso = 0.63514 Mauritius Rupee
1 Philippine Peso = 0.29614 Maldives Rufiyaa
1 Philippine Peso = 13.77317 Malawi Kwacha
1 Philippine Peso = 0.35764 Mexican Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 0.07562 Malaysian Ringgit
1 Philippine Peso = 0.22261 Namibian Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 6.9112 Nigerian Naira
1 Philippine Peso = 0.59556 Nicaragua Cordoba
1 Philippine Peso = 0.15133 Norwegian Krone
1 Philippine Peso = 1.99853 Nepalese Rupee
1 Philippine Peso = 0.02647 New Zealand Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.00743 Omani Rial
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01931 Panama Balboa
1 Philippine Peso = 0.06266 Peruvian Nuevo Sol
1 Philippine Peso = 0.06071 Papua New Guinea Kina
1 Philippine Peso = 1 Philippine Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 2.13127 Pakistani Rupee
1 Philippine Peso = 0.06552 Polish Zloty
1 Philippine Peso = 107.39382 Paraguayan Guarani
1 Philippine Peso = 0.07027 Qatar Rial
1 Philippine Peso = 0.07302 Romanian New Leu
1 Philippine Peso = 1.08832 Russian Rouble
1 Philippine Peso = 16.23803 Rwanda Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 0.07239 Saudi Arabian Riyal
1 Philippine Peso = 0.14989 Solomon Islands Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.25792 Seychelles Rupee
1 Philippine Peso = 0.34575 Sudanese Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 0.15762 Swedish Krona
1 Philippine Peso = 0.02545 Singapore Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01382 St Helena Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 0.42869 Slovak Koruna
1 Philippine Peso = 147.2973 Sierra Leone Leone
1 Philippine Peso = 10.84942 Somali Shilling
1 Philippine Peso = 384.74904 Sao Tome Dobra
1 Philippine Peso = 0.16892 El Salvador Colon
1 Philippine Peso = 9.9417 Syrian Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 0.22262 Swaziland Lilageni
1 Philippine Peso = 0.60579 Thai Baht
1 Philippine Peso = 0.04633 Tunisian Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.04271 Tongan paʻanga
1 Philippine Peso = 0.07317 Turkish Lira
1 Philippine Peso = 0.12974 Trinidad Tobago Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.56444 Taiwan Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 43.35907 Tanzanian Shilling
1 Philippine Peso = 0.52008 Ukraine Hryvnia
1 Philippine Peso = 70.40541 Ugandan Shilling
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01931 United States Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.54923 Uruguayan New Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 157.72201 Uzbekistan Sum
1 Philippine Peso = 558.39769 Venezuelan Bolivar
1 Philippine Peso = 438.97684 Vietnam Dong
1 Philippine Peso = 2.05502 Vanuatu Vatu
1 Philippine Peso = 0.04818 Samoa Tala
1 Philippine Peso = 10.28822 CFA Franc (BEAC)
1 Philippine Peso = 0.05212 East Caribbean Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 10.28822 CFA Franc (BCEAO)
1 Philippine Peso = 1.87297 Pacific Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 4.82336 Yemen Riyal
1 Philippine Peso = 0.22278 South African Rand
1 Philippine Peso = 100.1834 Zambian Kwacha
1 Philippine Peso = 6.98649 Zimbabwe dollar

Divorce, a need whose time has come

The “media circus” is not exclusively the doing of Patricia Bautista.  Both are  airing dirty laundry.   The following was revealed by  Andres Bautista himself.  Below are what I recall hearing, none of which are from the wife’s  camp.   They all came from the press cons and interviews of Andres Bautista:  

That his wife has had a third-party that factored in their estrangement in 2013, that Patricia has been seeing someone else.  That his wife forcibly opened his cabinet and took documents, cash, ATMs, gift certificates, bank passbooks, financial reports and an IPad.  That he filed cases for grave coercion, qualified theft, robbery, among others against his wife.

That he made charges against his wife in connection with the latter’s accusation that he has unexplained wealth amounting to close to P1 billion.   He told media that he did not lie in his SALN.  That the money  was in the name of his parents, siblings.  That his wife is guilty of extortion.  That he denies all of his wife’s allegations and dismissed them as fabricated lies.

He told media his estranged wife stole cash, checks and other financial documents belonging to him and his family.   He claims his wife attempted to  blackmail him using her lawyers and media contacts.  That with media people at the Taguig City prosecutor’s office, he raised four fingers to indicate the number of charges he filed against his wife.

He accused his wife of attempting to extort money from him while she was having a relationship.   That his wife is motivated by greed and that she will stop at nothing to besmirch his reputation and that of his family, for the purpose of financial gain.   He said that his wife is allowing herself to be used by certain people and groups to promote a political agenda designed to cast aspersions on him and the Comelec’s work in the 2016 elections.

He said that the cash, GCs, ATM cards and other financial documents, his wife’s lawyers embellished, doctored or fabricated.   He said he is willing to quit his post if proven that the allegations were true.  He called Atty. Lorna Kapunan, his wife’s lawyer, ridiculous;  to be ignored, that he’s not afraid of her...that Atty.  Kapunan is really rude.

He showed media the cover letter of a draft impeachment complaint prepared against him with threat if he does not agree with the terms of their settlement.   He accused his wife of transferring thousands of dollars and pesos into her account.  And many more details about the feud, details coming from Andres Bautista himself, creating a media circus.

Abigail Valte, former spokesperson of ex-President  Aquino, joined what Andres Bautista refers to as a “media circus.”   Valte is in defense of the team of Andres Bautista, Mar Roxas, Mar’s USec Rene Limcaoco whose family owns Luzon Development Bank where Bautista has 35 passbooks containing a total of P329,220,962 as  alleged by his wife Patricia Bautista. Valte was responding to published reports of journalist Chari Villa that Bautista has received checks from Dean Nilo Divina’s Law Office.  Smartmatic is represented by Divina Law office, alleged Villa.

There will be more on  the continuing saga of the case of  Mrs. Bautista vs Mr. Bautista.  And if we are to believe Patricia Bautista, what we will next hear is,  The People of the Philippines vs Mr. Bautista.  

***

A hypothetical couple--has been out-of-love since 2013, almost 5 years of misery and hatred, but forced to live under the same roof,  dealing daily with each other.  All because the Catholic  church orders the government not to allow divorce; prohibit  finding happiness elsewhere.  If there was divorce for people who are hopelessly out-of-love, what might the court system do for them?  A divorce (not a Hollywood or Las Vegas divorce).   Serious, equitable divorce like they have in every sensible country in the world, except the Philippines.  

Each party will get a lawyer.  Both lawyers will meet two or three times together at a Starbuck, haggling for each client, legally and equitably dividing the assets and children custody according to the dictates of the law.  The wife is a successful lawyer earning P300,000 a month.  The husband is a private school teacher earning P48,000 a month.  The lawyers add both incomes = P348,000.  The three children’s lifestyle to which they are accustomed  (private schools, tennis, music, and ballet lessons, restaurants, vacations, medicals, etc.) = P100,000/month.  

Leftover is P248,000 divided by 2 = P124,000 for the wife; P124,000 for the husband.  

The wife will have to give P76,000 of her salary as alimony/support for her ex-husband as the law dictates.   If the salaries were reversed, it is the husband who would give the alimony of P76,000 of his salary to the wife.   They all will have to move out of their extravagant home and move to 2 cheaper apartments.  Custody of the children is shared by father and mother in separate  happy homes.   This is an equitable divorce.  

Such a divorce in the Philippines would have avoided the tragedy of the likes of Ruby Barrameda, killed over child custody.  The Philippines has had many parricides in desperate marriages frequently with the wife as victim.   While murder of husbands are far between, the abused, livid, desperate  Pinay gets even when her husband wakes up castrated and bleeding.  Such tragedy can be avoided by the justice system  by allowing many dysfunctional, unhappy couples to legally break up.

***

Dahliaspillera@yahoo.com
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