February 26, 2018, 11:17 am
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1 Philippine Peso = 0.0709 UAE Dirham
1 Philippine Peso = 2.0666 Albanian Lek
1 Philippine Peso = 0.03436 Neth Antilles Guilder
1 Philippine Peso = 0.38512 Argentine Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 0.0246 Australian Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.03436 Aruba Florin
1 Philippine Peso = 0.03861 Barbados Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 1.59981 Bangladesh Taka
1 Philippine Peso = 0.0307 Bulgarian Lev
1 Philippine Peso = 0.00727 Bahraini Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 33.8027 Burundi Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01931 Bermuda Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.02544 Brunei Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.13243 Bolivian Boliviano
1 Philippine Peso = 0.06249 Brazilian Real
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01931 Bahamian Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 1.24035 Bhutan Ngultrum
1 Philippine Peso = 0.18341 Botswana Pula
1 Philippine Peso = 386.48649 Belarus Ruble
1 Philippine Peso = 0.03857 Belize Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.02437 Canadian Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01807 Swiss Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 11.38996 Chilean Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 0.12225 Chinese Yuan
1 Philippine Peso = 54.88417 Colombian Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 10.92317 Costa Rica Colon
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01931 Cuban Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 1.73147 Cape Verde Escudo
1 Philippine Peso = 0.39788 Czech Koruna
1 Philippine Peso = 3.41371 Djibouti Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 0.11689 Danish Krone
1 Philippine Peso = 0.94363 Dominican Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 2.19764 Algerian Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.24563 Estonian Kroon
1 Philippine Peso = 0.34054 Egyptian Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 0.5251 Ethiopian Birr
1 Philippine Peso = 0.0157 Euro
1 Philippine Peso = 0.03853 Fiji Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01381 Falkland Islands Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01382 British Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 0.08607 Ghanaian Cedi
1 Philippine Peso = 0.90347 Gambian Dalasi
1 Philippine Peso = 173.55213 Guinea Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 0.14162 Guatemala Quetzal
1 Philippine Peso = 3.93494 Guyana Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.15101 Hong Kong Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.45448 Honduras Lempira
1 Philippine Peso = 0.11653 Croatian Kuna
1 Philippine Peso = 1.23243 Haiti Gourde
1 Philippine Peso = 4.90965 Hungarian Forint
1 Philippine Peso = 263.76448 Indonesian Rupiah
1 Philippine Peso = 0.06723 Israeli Shekel
1 Philippine Peso = 1.25268 Indian Rupee
1 Philippine Peso = 22.85714 Iraqi Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 718.33978 Iran Rial
1 Philippine Peso = 1.93822 Iceland Krona
1 Philippine Peso = 2.4222 Jamaican Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01364 Jordanian Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 2.0617 Japanese Yen
1 Philippine Peso = 1.96236 Kenyan Shilling
1 Philippine Peso = 1.311 Kyrgyzstan Som
1 Philippine Peso = 76.94981 Cambodia Riel
1 Philippine Peso = 7.70077 Comoros Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 17.37452 North Korean Won
1 Philippine Peso = 20.76255 Korean Won
1 Philippine Peso = 0.00578 Kuwaiti Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01583 Cayman Islands Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 6.1749 Kazakhstan Tenge
1 Philippine Peso = 159.87839 Lao Kip
1 Philippine Peso = 29.06178 Lebanese Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 2.99421 Sri Lanka Rupee
1 Philippine Peso = 2.50386 Liberian Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.22268 Lesotho Loti
1 Philippine Peso = 0.05886 Lithuanian Lita
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01198 Latvian Lat
1 Philippine Peso = 0.0257 Libyan Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.1777 Moroccan Dirham
1 Philippine Peso = 0.32037 Moldovan Leu
1 Philippine Peso = 0.96332 Macedonian Denar
1 Philippine Peso = 25.79151 Myanmar Kyat
1 Philippine Peso = 46.1583 Mongolian Tugrik
1 Philippine Peso = 0.15547 Macau Pataca
1 Philippine Peso = 6.75676 Mauritania Ougulya
1 Philippine Peso = 0.63514 Mauritius Rupee
1 Philippine Peso = 0.29614 Maldives Rufiyaa
1 Philippine Peso = 13.77317 Malawi Kwacha
1 Philippine Peso = 0.35764 Mexican Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 0.07562 Malaysian Ringgit
1 Philippine Peso = 0.22261 Namibian Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 6.9112 Nigerian Naira
1 Philippine Peso = 0.59556 Nicaragua Cordoba
1 Philippine Peso = 0.15133 Norwegian Krone
1 Philippine Peso = 1.99853 Nepalese Rupee
1 Philippine Peso = 0.02647 New Zealand Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.00743 Omani Rial
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01931 Panama Balboa
1 Philippine Peso = 0.06266 Peruvian Nuevo Sol
1 Philippine Peso = 0.06071 Papua New Guinea Kina
1 Philippine Peso = 1 Philippine Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 2.13127 Pakistani Rupee
1 Philippine Peso = 0.06552 Polish Zloty
1 Philippine Peso = 107.39382 Paraguayan Guarani
1 Philippine Peso = 0.07027 Qatar Rial
1 Philippine Peso = 0.07302 Romanian New Leu
1 Philippine Peso = 1.08832 Russian Rouble
1 Philippine Peso = 16.23803 Rwanda Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 0.07239 Saudi Arabian Riyal
1 Philippine Peso = 0.14989 Solomon Islands Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.25792 Seychelles Rupee
1 Philippine Peso = 0.34575 Sudanese Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 0.15762 Swedish Krona
1 Philippine Peso = 0.02545 Singapore Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01382 St Helena Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 0.42869 Slovak Koruna
1 Philippine Peso = 147.2973 Sierra Leone Leone
1 Philippine Peso = 10.84942 Somali Shilling
1 Philippine Peso = 384.74904 Sao Tome Dobra
1 Philippine Peso = 0.16892 El Salvador Colon
1 Philippine Peso = 9.9417 Syrian Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 0.22262 Swaziland Lilageni
1 Philippine Peso = 0.60579 Thai Baht
1 Philippine Peso = 0.04633 Tunisian Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.04271 Tongan paʻanga
1 Philippine Peso = 0.07317 Turkish Lira
1 Philippine Peso = 0.12974 Trinidad Tobago Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.56444 Taiwan Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 43.35907 Tanzanian Shilling
1 Philippine Peso = 0.52008 Ukraine Hryvnia
1 Philippine Peso = 70.40541 Ugandan Shilling
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01931 United States Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.54923 Uruguayan New Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 157.72201 Uzbekistan Sum
1 Philippine Peso = 558.39769 Venezuelan Bolivar
1 Philippine Peso = 438.97684 Vietnam Dong
1 Philippine Peso = 2.05502 Vanuatu Vatu
1 Philippine Peso = 0.04818 Samoa Tala
1 Philippine Peso = 10.28822 CFA Franc (BEAC)
1 Philippine Peso = 0.05212 East Caribbean Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 10.28822 CFA Franc (BCEAO)
1 Philippine Peso = 1.87297 Pacific Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 4.82336 Yemen Riyal
1 Philippine Peso = 0.22278 South African Rand
1 Philippine Peso = 100.1834 Zambian Kwacha
1 Philippine Peso = 6.98649 Zimbabwe dollar

Disloyalty

GUESS whose tweets are the following which were published in the social news and blog site Politiko and posted on Facebook:
1) “We will hold the line, stand our ground, dig in our heels, push back as far as we can as duty demands, and fight to the finish. Sure, more likely our finish but down shall we go with the honor of which they are bereft. How to say.” (Suggested statement for Maria Ressa of Rappler on the closure of online news site Rappler.com)
2) “You will get more favorable publicity by this idiot decision (referring to the SEC decision cancelling Rappler’s corporate license) than any story you can write. Next accusation: you bribed SEC to rule against you. All the best.”
Sounds like they are from a rabid oppositionist or worse, a Yellowtard, right?
Wrong!
They are tweets to Rappler head Ressa from our Permanent Representative to the United Nations in New York, Teodoro Locsin, Jr., an appointee of President Rodrigo Roa Duterte aka Digong.
Locsin also retweeted one Mike Forsythe, thus:
“Listen up, Filipinos following the news now on Rappler’s loss of corporate status, this is real suppression of press freedom. Kidnapping.” 
Wow, them are strong words against the Duterte administration!
I asked a number of DFA insiders what they think of Locsin’s tweets. The replies I got were they “can’t figure him out”, “don’t know where he’s coming from” and “he must have backer/s in Malacañang that let him get away with his tweets”. 
Or maybe the backer/s are not aware of his tweets? But that is not likely.
So, how come there has been no reaction whatsoever from Malacañang to Locsin’s tweets? That’s strange given the very strong sentiments expressed by Digong against Rappler for unfair and biased reporting and purveying fake news. The chief executive was also accused of being behind the SEC decision and stifling press freedom which his spokesman has categorically denied.
This is not the first time Locsin has taken a view on a matter contrary to Digong’s.
Recently, he criticized and directly contradicted Digong’s position on the phaseout of jeepneys. He said “jeepneys are the king of the Philippine roads and should remain that way” and that “luxury cars should be banned instead and that the iconic vehicles’ engine should just be upgraded to Benz”.
Incidentally, Locsin also tweeted: “The more interesting question is how this affects PLDT and the huge Indonesian presumably non-voting investment therein. Could be just foreplay to let in the Chinese telecom as 2nd not 3rd player.”
Is this a dig at Digong’s earlier statement that he would like to see China as the 3rd telco player in the country?
Without a doubt, Locsin is an anomaly within the Duterte administration.
Digong has fired several officials for “merely” travelling too much. To many, Locsin’s indiscretion is far more serious than that. It smacks of disloyalty to the President and his policies.
It takes years to get the hang of UN work. Locsin should just concentrate on doing that instead of embroiling himself with issues at home and expressing views contrary to those of his President or the government. He should never forget that his is a very important job – representing his country in the community of nations and faithfully presenting his government’s views and policies on national and world affairs and, if necessary, defending them. 
If he can’t do that, he should just resign out of delicadeza, that is, if Digong has indeed compelling reasons not to fire him. 

INDONESIAN LAW ON INTERNET USE 

Those bleeding hearts who complain of curtailment of press freedom in the country should have a look at our friend and neighbor, Indonesia. 
Recently, an Indonesian teen was jailed for eighteen months for “insulting” President Widodo Jokowi by making defamatory and slanderous comments on Facbook.
Earlier, a local politician was sentenced to one year in jail for a post on Facebook considered to be insulting to Islam and “inciting hatred”.
Can anyone imagine how many in the Philippines would go to jail and for much longer periods if we had such a draconian law on the use of the internet, given the number of inflammatory messages and insults against Digong that one reads online everyday?
Boy, we are lucky!
***
REMINDERS 
This segment is intended to remind the administration of some of its yet unfulfilled promises and matters that need attention and/or follow-up action.
1) Digong’s promise to rid the country of foreign troops. This, of course, necessitates re-visiting the lopsided VFA and the EDCA with the US.
2) Reciprocal visa arrangements with the US and other countries.
3) The retrieval of the Balangiga bells.
4) The return of the Canadian waste.
5) The immediate implementation of the FOI.
***
Today is the 257thday of the eleventh year of the enforced disappearance of Jonas Burgos, son of the late press icon and founder of this newspaper.
After the acquittal of Major Harry Baliaga Jr., the only person formally charged with Jonas’ kidnapping, I guess what happens next is now up to Divine Providence.
***
From an internet friend:
Some quotes from Mark Twain, American novelist, lecturer and philosopher:
1. Clothes make the man. Naked people have little or no influence on society.
2. Never put off until tomorrow what you can do the day after tomorrow.
3. Whenever you find that you are on the side of the majority, it’s time to reform.
4. Be careful about reading health books. You may die of a misprint.
5. I have never taken exercise, except sleeping and resting.
6. Go to heaven for the climate, hell for the company.
7. Honesty is the best policy – when there is money in it.
8. Under certain circumstances, profanity provides a relief denied even to a prayer.
9. I have a higher standard of principle than George Washington. He could not lie. I can, but I won’t.
10. I thoroughly disapprove of duels. If a man challenged me, I would take him kindly and forgivingly by the hand and lead him to a quiet place and kill him.
11. All you need in life is ignorance and confidence, then success is sure.
12. Part of the secret success of life is to eat what you like and let the food fight it out inside.
***
23 January 2018
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