March 29, 2017, 7:24 am
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1 Philippine Peso = 0.07331 UAE Dirham
1 Philippine Peso = 2.47155 Albanian Lek
1 Philippine Peso = 0.03534 Neth Antilles Guilder
1 Philippine Peso = 0.31132 Argentine Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 0.02618 Australian Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.03575 Aruba Florin
1 Philippine Peso = 0.03993 Barbados Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 1.60092 Bangladesh Taka
1 Philippine Peso = 0.03586 Bulgarian Lev
1 Philippine Peso = 0.00753 Bahraini Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 33.91895 Burundi Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01996 Bermuda Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.0278 Brunei Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.13715 Bolivian Boliviano
1 Philippine Peso = 0.06246 Brazilian Real
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01996 Bahamian Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 1.30515 Bhutan Ngultrum
1 Philippine Peso = 0.20135 Botswana Pula
1 Philippine Peso = 399.68057 Belarus Ruble
1 Philippine Peso = 0.03988 Belize Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.02669 Canadian Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01966 Swiss Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 13.25953 Chilean Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 0.13713 Chinese Yuan
1 Philippine Peso = 58.11339 Colombian Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 10.94729 Costa Rica Colon
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01996 Cuban Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 2.02635 Cape Verde Escudo
1 Philippine Peso = 0.49646 Czech Koruna
1 Philippine Peso = 3.53643 Djibouti Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 0.13669 Danish Krone
1 Philippine Peso = 0.9443 Dominican Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 2.17654 Algerian Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.28741 Estonian Kroon
1 Philippine Peso = 0.35935 Egyptian Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 0.45338 Ethiopian Birr
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01837 Euro
1 Philippine Peso = 0.04141 Fiji Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01585 Falkland Islands Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01589 British Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 0.08644 Ghanaian Cedi
1 Philippine Peso = 0.87263 Gambian Dalasi
1 Philippine Peso = 185.36634 Guinea Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 0.14655 Guatemala Quetzal
1 Philippine Peso = 4.10222 Guyana Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.15507 Hong Kong Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.46756 Honduras Lempira
1 Philippine Peso = 0.13591 Croatian Kuna
1 Philippine Peso = 1.35316 Haiti Gourde
1 Philippine Peso = 5.67678 Hungarian Forint
1 Philippine Peso = 265.52206 Indonesian Rupiah
1 Philippine Peso = 0.07197 Israeli Shekel
1 Philippine Peso = 1.29726 Indian Rupee
1 Philippine Peso = 23.5576 Iraqi Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 647.3348 Iran Rial
1 Philippine Peso = 2.18607 Iceland Krona
1 Philippine Peso = 2.56259 Jamaican Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01415 Jordanian Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 2.20817 Japanese Yen
1 Philippine Peso = 2.04931 Kenyan Shilling
1 Philippine Peso = 1.37303 Kyrgyzstan Som
1 Philippine Peso = 79.08964 Cambodia Riel
1 Philippine Peso = 9.03374 Comoros Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 17.96766 North Korean Won
1 Philippine Peso = 22.12218 Korean Won
1 Philippine Peso = 0.00607 Kuwaiti Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01637 Cayman Islands Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 6.29786 Kazakhstan Tenge
1 Philippine Peso = 163.48573 Lao Kip
1 Philippine Peso = 30.14574 Lebanese Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 3.02855 Sri Lanka Rupee
1 Philippine Peso = 1.79677 Liberian Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.25494 Lesotho Loti
1 Philippine Peso = 0.06086 Lithuanian Lita
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01239 Latvian Lat
1 Philippine Peso = 0.02815 Libyan Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.19822 Moroccan Dirham
1 Philippine Peso = 0.3868 Moldovan Leu
1 Philippine Peso = 1.12338 Macedonian Denar
1 Philippine Peso = 27.27091 Myanmar Kyat
1 Philippine Peso = 48.87203 Mongolian Tugrik
1 Philippine Peso = 0.15971 Macau Pataca
1 Philippine Peso = 7.12717 Mauritania Ougulya
1 Philippine Peso = 0.70293 Mauritius Rupee
1 Philippine Peso = 0.30705 Maldives Rufiyaa
1 Philippine Peso = 14.19445 Malawi Kwacha
1 Philippine Peso = 0.37646 Mexican Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 0.0879 Malaysian Ringgit
1 Philippine Peso = 0.2547 Namibian Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 6.28868 Nigerian Naira
1 Philippine Peso = 0.58595 Nicaragua Cordoba
1 Philippine Peso = 0.16921 Norwegian Krone
1 Philippine Peso = 2.08325 Nepalese Rupee
1 Philippine Peso = 0.02832 New Zealand Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.00768 Omani Rial
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01996 Panama Balboa
1 Philippine Peso = 0.06481 Peruvian Nuevo Sol
1 Philippine Peso = 0.06558 Papua New Guinea Kina
1 Philippine Peso = 1 Philippine Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 2.09024 Pakistani Rupee
1 Philippine Peso = 0.078 Polish Zloty
1 Philippine Peso = 112.66121 Paraguayan Guarani
1 Philippine Peso = 0.07267 Qatar Rial
1 Philippine Peso = 0.08354 Romanian New Leu
1 Philippine Peso = 1.13647 Russian Rouble
1 Philippine Peso = 16.31603 Rwanda Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 0.07486 Saudi Arabian Riyal
1 Philippine Peso = 0.15525 Solomon Islands Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.26353 Seychelles Rupee
1 Philippine Peso = 0.13296 Sudanese Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 0.1752 Swedish Krona
1 Philippine Peso = 0.02781 Singapore Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01585 St Helena Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 0.44332 Slovak Koruna
1 Philippine Peso = 149.43102 Sierra Leone Leone
1 Philippine Peso = 10.96027 Somali Shilling
1 Philippine Peso = 450.2196 Sao Tome Dobra
1 Philippine Peso = 0.17413 El Salvador Colon
1 Philippine Peso = 10.28109 Syrian Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 0.25482 Swaziland Lilageni
1 Philippine Peso = 0.68597 Thai Baht
1 Philippine Peso = 0.04577 Tunisian Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.046 Tongan paʻanga
1 Philippine Peso = 0.07215 Turkish Lira
1 Philippine Peso = 0.13393 Trinidad Tobago Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.60168 Taiwan Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 44.44001 Tanzanian Shilling
1 Philippine Peso = 0.54103 Ukraine Hryvnia
1 Philippine Peso = 71.81074 Ugandan Shilling
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01996 United States Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.55999 Uruguayan New Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 71.67099 Uzbekistan Sum
1 Philippine Peso = 0.19904 Venezuelan Bolivar
1 Philippine Peso = 454.62168 Vietnam Dong
1 Philippine Peso = 2.12378 Vanuatu Vatu
1 Philippine Peso = 0.05122 Samoa Tala
1 Philippine Peso = 12.04033 CFA Franc (BEAC)
1 Philippine Peso = 0.0539 East Caribbean Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 12.12298 CFA Franc (BCEAO)
1 Philippine Peso = 2.18127 Pacific Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 4.98902 Yemen Riyal
1 Philippine Peso = 0.25486 South African Rand
1 Philippine Peso = 103.60351 Zambian Kwacha
1 Philippine Peso = 7.225 Zimbabwe dollar

Damage control

THE holidays may be behind us but their physical effects, among others, will linger a while. Medically speaking, it is actually a time for “damage control” for those of us who have over-indulged during the festivities. The post-holiday “makeover” is just as a healthy pre-emptive measure, more so for those who really want to maintain their normal weight or those who have diabetes, heart disease, hypertension, hypercholesterolemia, etc. 

As with anything else, damage control is best as a preventive strategy. However, the special celebration and holidays, like a birthday bash, a wedding reception, Thanksgiving Day, and especially the Christmas and New Year festivities, which could go on for more than a week, expose all of us to that great irresistible gastronomical temptation. 

For dieters, those who are watching their weight or counting calories, these occasions are tough times. Blessed are those strong-willed souls, whether or not they carry a calorie-counter on one hand and a scale on the other. These health-conscious individuals will reap their rewards in terms of stamina, energy, a stronger immune system, and even longevity, as shown by medical statistics.

Bear and horse analogy
Here is an analogy to clarify a point: “The bear, a carnivorous, eats with impunity in one sitting, gaining pounds after pounds, and then sleeps, slowing down its body metabolism, while the horse grazes on grass several times the whole day, and runs around very frequently, and as such, is a more agile, much leaner, and healthier animal.”

Our physiology is at the optimum when we exercise and consume just the right amount of calories of the right foods to maintain our normal weight and when our glucose (blood sugar) level is on an even keel most of the time. When we over-eat and then try to starve ourselves to compensate for our indiscretion, our blood glucose spikes up and down, described as yo-yo dieting. This severe fluctuation in our blood glucose level has adverse effects on our body and on our immune system. And this poses even greater danger for persons with diabetes.

Eating several times a day, even 5 or 6 times a day, not exceeding the total 24-hour caloric need of our body, is a healthier habit, which helps maintain our blood glucose level in a more stable, less erratic, pattern during the day. But the key is calorie-control, especially the ones from carbohydrates (rice, bread, soft drinks, cakes, ice-cream, candies, and other sweets). 

About 10 years ago, we wrote about two main hormones that control our appetite, which is apropos to our discussion. Here is a segment of that column:

What triggers hunger and satiety?
The urge to eat (hungry or not) is, to a large extent, controlled by hormones in our body. And these hormones fluctuate depending on how much sleep we get, what types of food we eat and how much calories we take in, and on how much physical activities we indulge in daily. Scientific researchers are focusing on four specific substances they call “fat hormones,” which our own endocrine glands in the body produce. There are hormones that make one eat and there are also hormones that signal the brain to tell the person to stop eating. These substances control hunger and satiety.

Whar is the ‘hunger hormone’?
The hunger hormone is Ghrelin, which is secreted by our guts (stomach and intestines). When its level goes up, we feel hungry and have the urge to eat. The level of Ghrelin goes up when we get less sleep or not enough sleep. This is the reason y those who are trying to lose weight should get adequate amount (about 8 hours) of sleep. An imbalanced meal and stress also elevate the Ghrelin level. Food deprivation obviously increases the Ghrelin level, hence it is better to keep the level of this hormone on an even keel and not fluctuate too much by eating regularly (or even more than 3 times a day) but at a controlled total calorie ceiling, to maintain health and body weight. So, starving oneself is not a good way to lose weight, since this will lead to a Ghrelin “boomerang” in the latter part of the day.

Which is the ‘satiety hormone’?
The opposite or counter-hormone, which is called Leptin, signals the brain when to stop eating. It controls the appetite. This “satiety hormone” is produced by fat cells in the body. When a person loses weight, the leptin level in the blood stream also goes down. As a result, there is a “rebound” weight gain. The best strategy in losing and maintaining a desired weight level is to lose in a slow and steady pace, about one to two pounds a week, and not more. In this manner, there will still be an effective level of leptin in the body to control the urge to eat.

Are appetite suppressants safe?
Most appetite control pills, juices, solutions and powders on the market are not physiological and they are “unnatural” ways to suppress (by force) the appetite for weight control. While they are readily available and very popular, they have potential adverse side effects on the heart, liver, kidneys and brain in the long haul. Some serious complications, and even deaths, have been reported from the use of these diet substances. Since greater calorie intake than output is the cause of increase in body weight, the safest, most natural strategy is to eat less and burn more calories with physical exercises, making the output of calories (energy) greater than the intake of calories (food). The use of appetite suppressants could be dangerous. It is foolish to look great in the coffin prematurely!

The healthier “damage control” for our post-holiday misadventures includes daily gradual incremental reduction in the food we eat, daily physical exercises, as simple and easy as brisk walking for about 30 minutes a day, and hitting the scale daily (yes, daily) to check on any progress. Drinking a lot of water (not fruit juices and, especially not toxic soft drinks!) can help a lot. Excess weight that does not come down only means a greater reduction in food intake is needed. The excess weight gained over the holidays could be safely eliminated within a week. For those really overweight to begin with, the same strategy (output of calories must exceed the intake) could be used. Simply put, more exercise and less food, until the scale tells you that you have achieved your dream weight for the NEW YOU and the new year. As a bonus, daily exercise also reduces the risk, not only for cardiovascular illnesses, but for Alzheimer’s and cancer…and it confers greater longevity too!

Savor life and enjoy the new year(s) with a healthier lifestyle. After all, we’ve got only one life, no spare, and it came with an uncertain limited warranty at that.

***

Please visit www.philipSchua.com

Email: scalpelpen@gmail.com
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