November 25, 2017, 4:09 am
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1 Philippine Peso = 0.07254 UAE Dirham
1 Philippine Peso = 2.22066 Albanian Lek
1 Philippine Peso = 0.03521 Neth Antilles Guilder
1 Philippine Peso = 0.34299 Argentine Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 0.02592 Australian Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.03516 Aruba Florin
1 Philippine Peso = 0.03951 Barbados Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 1.60589 Bangladesh Taka
1 Philippine Peso = 0.03253 Bulgarian Lev
1 Philippine Peso = 0.00746 Bahraini Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 34.51185 Burundi Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01976 Bermuda Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.02656 Brunei Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.13552 Bolivian Boliviano
1 Philippine Peso = 0.06373 Brazilian Real
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01976 Bahamian Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 1.27914 Bhutan Ngultrum
1 Philippine Peso = 0.20568 Botswana Pula
1 Philippine Peso = 395.49586 Belarus Ruble
1 Philippine Peso = 0.03947 Belize Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.0251 Canadian Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01934 Swiss Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 12.5162 Chilean Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 0.13038 Chinese Yuan
1 Philippine Peso = 58.75346 Colombian Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 11.09502 Costa Rica Colon
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01976 Cuban Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 1.82714 Cape Verde Escudo
1 Philippine Peso = 0.42146 Czech Koruna
1 Philippine Peso = 3.5079 Djibouti Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 0.12329 Danish Krone
1 Philippine Peso = 0.94607 Dominican Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 2.26118 Algerian Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.25918 Estonian Kroon
1 Philippine Peso = 0.34868 Egyptian Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 0.53457 Ethiopian Birr
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01656 Euro
1 Philippine Peso = 0.04139 Fiji Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01481 Falkland Islands Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01481 British Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 0.09104 Ghanaian Cedi
1 Philippine Peso = 0.92967 Gambian Dalasi
1 Philippine Peso = 177.69657 Guinea Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 0.1449 Guatemala Quetzal
1 Philippine Peso = 4.07922 Guyana Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.15426 Hong Kong Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.46501 Honduras Lempira
1 Philippine Peso = 0.12517 Croatian Kuna
1 Philippine Peso = 1.22145 Haiti Gourde
1 Philippine Peso = 5.16041 Hungarian Forint
1 Philippine Peso = 266.6535 Indonesian Rupiah
1 Philippine Peso = 0.0693 Israeli Shekel
1 Philippine Peso = 1.27625 Indian Rupee
1 Philippine Peso = 23.03437 Iraqi Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 696.06876 Iran Rial
1 Philippine Peso = 2.03813 Iceland Krona
1 Philippine Peso = 2.47234 Jamaican Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01397 Jordanian Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 2.20192 Japanese Yen
1 Philippine Peso = 2.03576 Kenyan Shilling
1 Philippine Peso = 1.37669 Kyrgyzstan Som
1 Philippine Peso = 79.67207 Cambodia Riel
1 Philippine Peso = 8.28586 Comoros Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 17.77953 North Korean Won
1 Philippine Peso = 21.38305 Korean Won
1 Philippine Peso = 0.00596 Kuwaiti Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.0162 Cayman Islands Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 6.52213 Kazakhstan Tenge
1 Philippine Peso = 164.26314 Lao Kip
1 Philippine Peso = 29.7906 Lebanese Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 3.03635 Sri Lanka Rupee
1 Philippine Peso = 2.46247 Liberian Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.27292 Lesotho Loti
1 Philippine Peso = 0.06023 Lithuanian Lita
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01226 Latvian Lat
1 Philippine Peso = 0.02699 Libyan Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.18541 Moroccan Dirham
1 Philippine Peso = 0.34526 Moldovan Leu
1 Philippine Peso = 1.01442 Macedonian Denar
1 Philippine Peso = 26.92612 Myanmar Kyat
1 Philippine Peso = 48.20229 Mongolian Tugrik
1 Philippine Peso = 0.15888 Macau Pataca
1 Philippine Peso = 6.91426 Mauritania Ougulya
1 Philippine Peso = 0.68451 Mauritius Rupee
1 Philippine Peso = 0.30047 Maldives Rufiyaa
1 Philippine Peso = 14.14757 Malawi Kwacha
1 Philippine Peso = 0.36633 Mexican Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 0.0813 Malaysian Ringgit
1 Philippine Peso = 0.27483 Namibian Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 7.03279 Nigerian Naira
1 Philippine Peso = 0.60352 Nicaragua Cordoba
1 Philippine Peso = 0.16042 Norwegian Krone
1 Philippine Peso = 2.04563 Nepalese Rupee
1 Philippine Peso = 0.02867 New Zealand Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.0076 Omani Rial
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01976 Panama Balboa
1 Philippine Peso = 0.06392 Peruvian Nuevo Sol
1 Philippine Peso = 0.06337 Papua New Guinea Kina
1 Philippine Peso = 1 Philippine Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 2.07685 Pakistani Rupee
1 Philippine Peso = 0.0697 Polish Zloty
1 Philippine Peso = 111.98933 Paraguayan Guarani
1 Philippine Peso = 0.07516 Qatar Rial
1 Philippine Peso = 0.07679 Romanian New Leu
1 Philippine Peso = 1.15428 Russian Rouble
1 Philippine Peso = 16.47807 Rwanda Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 0.07408 Saudi Arabian Riyal
1 Philippine Peso = 0.15686 Solomon Islands Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.26162 Seychelles Rupee
1 Philippine Peso = 0.13157 Sudanese Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 0.16365 Swedish Krona
1 Philippine Peso = 0.02658 Singapore Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01482 St Helena Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 0.43868 Slovak Koruna
1 Philippine Peso = 150.13829 Sierra Leone Leone
1 Philippine Peso = 11.00356 Somali Shilling
1 Philippine Peso = 406.44806 Sao Tome Dobra
1 Philippine Peso = 0.17286 El Salvador Colon
1 Philippine Peso = 10.17345 Syrian Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 0.27485 Swaziland Lilageni
1 Philippine Peso = 0.6448 Thai Baht
1 Philippine Peso = 0.04877 Tunisian Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.04522 Tongan paʻanga
1 Philippine Peso = 0.07781 Turkish Lira
1 Philippine Peso = 0.13097 Trinidad Tobago Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.5918 Taiwan Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 44.15251 Tanzanian Shilling
1 Philippine Peso = 0.53121 Ukraine Hryvnia
1 Philippine Peso = 71.55275 Ugandan Shilling
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01976 United States Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.57349 Uruguayan New Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 159.22561 Uzbekistan Sum
1 Philippine Peso = 0.19705 Venezuelan Bolivar
1 Philippine Peso = 448.93324 Vietnam Dong
1 Philippine Peso = 2.09581 Vanuatu Vatu
1 Philippine Peso = 0.05077 Samoa Tala
1 Philippine Peso = 10.85875 CFA Franc (BEAC)
1 Philippine Peso = 0.05334 East Caribbean Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 10.88937 CFA Franc (BCEAO)
1 Philippine Peso = 1.96543 Pacific Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 4.93678 Yemen Riyal
1 Philippine Peso = 0.27485 South African Rand
1 Philippine Peso = 102.51877 Zambian Kwacha
1 Philippine Peso = 7.14935 Zimbabwe dollar

CIA

I WENT over the video again. President Rodrigo Roa Duterte aka Digong didn’t say the European Union ambassadors should leave the country within 24 hours, as reported by the mainstream media. 

What he actually implied was that once any EU ambassador interferes in our domestic affairs again, s/he would be told to leave within 24 hours. 

I submit that should apply to all foreign envoys in the country as well.

***

One thing Digong categorically and in unmistakable terms did say was that if he gets killed, “America na ‘yan, CIA na ‘yan.” 

(NOTE: CIA stands for Central Intelligence Agency that reportedly has its largest outpost in this region in the Philippines.)

“‘Yan CIA stop fucking. One day, I will just drive you away. It’s either they or your cahoots here will have to kill me or you have to get out of my country. Choose. Basta ako sabihin ko sa Pilipino, ‘pag namatay ako, America na ‘yan. CIA na ‘yan,” he said.

He was referring to the reported clandestine moves by allegedly US-supported sinister groups, specifically citing news site Rappler as being CIA-funded, to take him out to prevent his pivot to US rivals China and Russia.

The CIA, of course, has in the past been suspected of having been involved in the assassination of national leaders around the world, including the late US President John F. Kennedy.

At this point, Digong ought to be reminded that he himself has said our military is pro-US. He should perhaps always bear that in mind.

***

I’d like to take this occasion to tell our readers my take on why the US is behaving the way she is towards Digong.

For the first time since the Republic was born in 1946, we have a president who is truly nationalistic. He wants to cut the umbilical cord that has made us dependent on the US. Nationalism in other countries is anathema to the US, especially in those with whom she has “special” relations like us. Her track record in stifling nationalism in Latin American countries is also common knowledge – Cuba, Chile, Venezuela, Bolivia, among others.

Unfortunately for us, we have had presidents who were subservient to the US, thus hindering our development as an independent nation. They also allowed the US to trample upon our national sovereignty and territorial integrity that made us lose the respect of the international community.

Until now…

As Digong has always been saying, the US is our friend. But that is not how she regards us. She has always regarded us as her vassals. 

Why? Because we always depended on her. That has to stop.

But the US would hear none of it. That is why she wants Digong out. 

So… how do we stop being dependent on the US? As Digong has done, we explore new avenues of cooperation with other countries, particularly those big political, economic and military powers such as China, Japan, Russia and South Korea.

Can anyone deny that Digong’s approach has paid off? 

We all have heard of the saying “a friend in need is a friend indeed”. Recent events have again shown that the US does not believe in it.

For instance, our security forces were in dire need of modern weaponry, ammunition and other military wherewithal to fight the terrorists in Marawi.

So, what happened? The US withheld delivery of 27,000 rifles that had been previously ordered because she doesn’t like our campaign against illegal drugs because of alleged human rights violations.

On the other hand, China and Russia donated, repeat, donated what we needed badly. 

China delivered a total of 6,000 new rifles, millions of rounds of ammunition and 90 sniper scopes. And lately, a huge shipment of heavy equipment also donated by her for use in the rehabilitation of Marawi has arrived.

Last week, Digong revealed that Russia has likewise decided to donate 5,000 Kalashnikov rifles, 1 million rounds of ammunition and 20 military trucks that are supposed to be delivered later this month.

Asked the reason for Russia’s donation, Defense Secretary Delfin Lorenzana said: 

“Gusto nila tumulong sa atin to fight terrorism. Sila rin kasi also fighting terrorism sa kanilang bansa and they want to help the worldwide fight against terrorism. Iyan ang kanilang rason.”

Earlier, Japan and South Korea also reportedly donated hardware for the use of our security forces.

***

Cynics have asked about these donations: “In exchange for what?” 

I agree, altruism does not normally define relations between nations. But I think these donor countries are not so stupid as to even hint at this time they want something in return. 

And, more importantly, I think Digong’s reaction to such an overture would be: “You can keep them. We will just try to cope with what we have…” Preceded or followed by expletives?

SENATOR DRILON

Senator Franklin Drilon, the epitome of Mr. Pork Barrel himself, is against the impeachment of Comelec Chairman Andres Bautista. He said it would delay important legislation.

And the vaudevillian hearings do not? Please…!

Some people say that Drilon, other senators and some congressmen do not really want to take the risk of Bautista being grilled about the alleged rigging of the last election.

But that is precisely the reason people want the impeachment of Bautista to proceed. Many suspect that their will was thwarted during that election.

***

QUESTION: Why do the “Yellows” now seem to prefer white shirts? 

ANSWER: Because they finally realized that “yellow” is slang for “cowardly”.

***

Today is the 166th day of the eleventh year of the enforced disappearance of Jonas Burgos, son of the late press icon and founder of this newspaper.

Ten years and 166 days is a long time! That is how long the mother, the wife, the children of Jonas Burgos have been suffering and undergoing excruciating pain. 

Jonas was abducted by elements of the military ten years ago. He was never seen again. 

Last week, the only person charged with arbitrary detention for his enforced disappearance, Maj. Harry Baliaga, Jr., was acquitted by Judge Alfonso Ruiz 2nd of Branch 216 of the Quezon City Regional Trial Court. He said the evidence presented against Baliaga was based on “hearsay” as the prosecution did not present witnesses who could directly identify Baliaga as the abductor of Jonas.

What else can Jonas’ kin do now except perhaps to pray that one day the person/s responsible for his disappearance would become conscience-stricken and confess to the crime. Miracles do happen.

***

From an internet friend:

Nearing the end of a hard life, old Ed was surrounded by his loved ones. As he sensed his final moment was approaching, he gathered all his strength and whispered: “I must tell you my greatest secret.” 
His family members were all ears, and urged him to go on.
“Before I got married, I had it all,” explained Ed. “Fast cars, cute girls, and plenty of money. But a good friend warned me....‘Get married and start a family. Otherwise, no-one will be there to give you a glass of water to drink when you’re on your deathbed.’” 
“So I took his advice. I traded the girls for a wife, beer for baby food. I sold my Ferrari and invested in college funds. And now here we are... And you know what?” 
“What?” whispered the fascinated members of his family.
“I’m not even thirsty!” 

***

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