February 24, 2018, 12:12 am
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1 Philippine Peso = 0.07045 UAE Dirham
1 Philippine Peso = 2.04297 Albanian Lek
1 Philippine Peso = 0.03415 Neth Antilles Guilder
1 Philippine Peso = 0.38059 Argentine Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 0.02443 Australian Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.03415 Aruba Florin
1 Philippine Peso = 0.03837 Barbados Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 1.59409 Bangladesh Taka
1 Philippine Peso = 0.0304 Bulgarian Lev
1 Philippine Peso = 0.00723 Bahraini Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 33.58872 Burundi Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01918 Bermuda Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.02533 Brunei Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.13159 Bolivian Boliviano
1 Philippine Peso = 0.06235 Brazilian Real
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01918 Bahamian Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 1.2325 Bhutan Ngultrum
1 Philippine Peso = 0.18295 Botswana Pula
1 Philippine Peso = 384.03989 Belarus Ruble
1 Philippine Peso = 0.03832 Belize Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.02429 Canadian Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.018 Swiss Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 11.42605 Chilean Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 0.12152 Chinese Yuan
1 Philippine Peso = 54.88202 Colombian Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 10.87186 Costa Rica Colon
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01918 Cuban Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 1.71801 Cape Verde Escudo
1 Philippine Peso = 0.39493 Czech Koruna
1 Philippine Peso = 3.3921 Djibouti Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 0.11601 Danish Krone
1 Philippine Peso = 0.94226 Dominican Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 2.17652 Algerian Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.24369 Estonian Kroon
1 Philippine Peso = 0.33858 Egyptian Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 0.52177 Ethiopian Birr
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01557 Euro
1 Philippine Peso = 0.03825 Fiji Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01371 Falkland Islands Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01377 British Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 0.08533 Ghanaian Cedi
1 Philippine Peso = 0.89967 Gambian Dalasi
1 Philippine Peso = 172.74122 Guinea Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 0.14073 Guatemala Quetzal
1 Philippine Peso = 3.9296 Guyana Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.15011 Hong Kong Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.45024 Honduras Lempira
1 Philippine Peso = 0.11584 Croatian Kuna
1 Philippine Peso = 1.216 Haiti Gourde
1 Philippine Peso = 4.85824 Hungarian Forint
1 Philippine Peso = 261.23153 Indonesian Rupiah
1 Philippine Peso = 0.06714 Israeli Shekel
1 Philippine Peso = 1.24329 Indian Rupee
1 Philippine Peso = 22.71245 Iraqi Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 713.12103 Iran Rial
1 Philippine Peso = 1.9248 Iceland Krona
1 Philippine Peso = 2.40936 Jamaican Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01359 Jordanian Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 2.0619 Japanese Yen
1 Philippine Peso = 1.9413 Kenyan Shilling
1 Philippine Peso = 1.3061 Kyrgyzstan Som
1 Philippine Peso = 77.09572 Cambodia Riel
1 Philippine Peso = 7.62709 Comoros Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 17.26453 North Korean Won
1 Philippine Peso = 20.55496 Korean Won
1 Philippine Peso = 0.00575 Kuwaiti Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01573 Cayman Islands Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 6.12565 Kazakhstan Tenge
1 Philippine Peso = 158.52676 Lao Kip
1 Philippine Peso = 28.96605 Lebanese Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 2.97621 Sri Lanka Rupee
1 Philippine Peso = 2.45904 Liberian Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.22463 Lesotho Loti
1 Philippine Peso = 0.05848 Lithuanian Lita
1 Philippine Peso = 0.0119 Latvian Lat
1 Philippine Peso = 0.02544 Libyan Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.17647 Moroccan Dirham
1 Philippine Peso = 0.31853 Moldovan Leu
1 Philippine Peso = 0.95396 Macedonian Denar
1 Philippine Peso = 25.47477 Myanmar Kyat
1 Philippine Peso = 45.90946 Mongolian Tugrik
1 Philippine Peso = 0.15451 Macau Pataca
1 Philippine Peso = 6.71398 Mauritania Ougulya
1 Philippine Peso = 0.62536 Mauritius Rupee
1 Philippine Peso = 0.29868 Maldives Rufiyaa
1 Philippine Peso = 13.76098 Malawi Kwacha
1 Philippine Peso = 0.35911 Mexican Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 0.07494 Malaysian Ringgit
1 Philippine Peso = 0.22327 Namibian Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 6.88663 Nigerian Naira
1 Philippine Peso = 0.59477 Nicaragua Cordoba
1 Philippine Peso = 0.15035 Norwegian Krone
1 Philippine Peso = 1.98703 Nepalese Rupee
1 Philippine Peso = 0.02611 New Zealand Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.00738 Omani Rial
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01918 Panama Balboa
1 Philippine Peso = 0.06229 Peruvian Nuevo Sol
1 Philippine Peso = 0.0629 Papua New Guinea Kina
1 Philippine Peso = 1 Philippine Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 2.11989 Pakistani Rupee
1 Philippine Peso = 0.06472 Polish Zloty
1 Philippine Peso = 106.82716 Paraguayan Guarani
1 Philippine Peso = 0.06982 Qatar Rial
1 Philippine Peso = 0.07256 Romanian New Leu
1 Philippine Peso = 1.0862 Russian Rouble
1 Philippine Peso = 16.12737 Rwanda Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 0.07193 Saudi Arabian Riyal
1 Philippine Peso = 0.14866 Solomon Islands Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.2582 Seychelles Rupee
1 Philippine Peso = 0.34501 Sudanese Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 0.15536 Swedish Krona
1 Philippine Peso = 0.02534 Singapore Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01372 St Helena Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 0.42597 Slovak Koruna
1 Philippine Peso = 146.36485 Sierra Leone Leone
1 Philippine Peso = 10.78074 Somali Shilling
1 Philippine Peso = 381.75523 Sao Tome Dobra
1 Philippine Peso = 0.16785 El Salvador Colon
1 Philippine Peso = 9.87876 Syrian Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 0.22325 Swaziland Lilageni
1 Philippine Peso = 0.60368 Thai Baht
1 Philippine Peso = 0.04586 Tunisian Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.0428 Tongan paʻanga
1 Philippine Peso = 0.07262 Turkish Lira
1 Philippine Peso = 0.12717 Trinidad Tobago Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.55966 Taiwan Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 43.06541 Tanzanian Shilling
1 Philippine Peso = 0.51746 Ukraine Hryvnia
1 Philippine Peso = 69.67197 Ugandan Shilling
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01918 United States Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.54556 Uruguayan New Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 156.62766 Uzbekistan Sum
1 Philippine Peso = 478.3426 Venezuelan Bolivar
1 Philippine Peso = 435.71839 Vietnam Dong
1 Philippine Peso = 1.98465 Vanuatu Vatu
1 Philippine Peso = 0.04817 Samoa Tala
1 Philippine Peso = 10.20986 CFA Franc (BEAC)
1 Philippine Peso = 0.05179 East Caribbean Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 10.20986 CFA Franc (BCEAO)
1 Philippine Peso = 1.85248 Pacific Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 4.79474 Yemen Riyal
1 Philippine Peso = 0.22325 South African Rand
1 Philippine Peso = 99.5492 Zambian Kwacha
1 Philippine Peso = 6.94226 Zimbabwe dollar

China is moving defense perimeters

THE Philippine Air Force spots regularly 10 to 12 Chinese Coast Guard vessels in the West Philippine Sea on maritime patrol missions. 
 
Sensing haste in increased Chinese activity in disputed waters, has prompted Manila to seek an expeditious ruling by a United Nations tribunal on its challenge to Beijing’s expansive claim over the South China Sea.
 
Foreign Secretary Albert del Rosario says that China’s increased activities in disputed waters are escalating tensions in the region.
 
“What we want to do is, because China is not participating, and because the situation is getting worse every day in the South China Sea, I’m asking if we can present a request to the tribunal if they can hasten the process,” Del Rosario says.
 
The West Philippine Sea is part of the South China Sea within the Philippines’ exclusive economic zone (EEZ), but China, insisting that it is part of its territory, is reclaiming land on reefs in those waters that may be used to build offshore military outposts.
 
China’s dredging vessels are escorted by Coast Guard ships to keep vessels from other claimant states away.
 
“We intensify the number of flights in the area so that we can detect the presence of ships and the developments on the islets … We can’t count the number of ships on a particular day because these are moving vessels on patrol. Their presence can’t be fixed in one place,” Air Force spokesperson Lt. Col. Enrico Canaya says.
 
Canaya says the maritime patrols had also observed dredging on islets, confirming reports of “development” on islets and reefs in the media.
 
China’s haste to stake its claim to 90 percent of the 3.5-million-square-kilometer South China Sea is seen as an effort to beat the conclusion of a code of conduct in disputed waters with its Southeast Asian neighbors and a ruling by the United Nations International Tribunal for the Law of the Sea on the challenge to that massive territorial claim brought by the Philippines in January last year.
 
China refuses to take part in the proceedings, but the tribunal has ordered it to respond to the Philippine case by Dec. 15.
 
Beijing has become increasingly aggressive in asserting its claim since the Philippine case went up and US President Barack Obama visited Asia in late April, assuring US allies Japan and the Philippines that the United States would defend them if attacked over territorial disputes.
 
The Philippines has asked the tribunal to nullify China’s claim to almost the entire South China Sea, which Manila says encroaches on its exclusive economic zone and those of Brunei, Malaysia, Vietnam and Taiwan, all of which also have claims in the strategic and resource-rich waterway.
 
Manila also wants to clarify maritime entitlements in the South China Sea and halt China’s incursions into the Philippines’ economic exclusion zone, which have become more frequent in recent months.
 
It may take three to four years for the UN tribunal to issue a decision.
 
Del Rosario hopes that “since China is not participating, perhaps we can get a quicker resolution from the tribunal.”
 
Or, it may take even longer because of the increased Chinese activities in the area.
 
The Philippines is pressing for a freeze on activities that raise tensions, a nonaggression pact to prevent the rival claims from erupting into conflict, and legal action for resolving the conflicting claims.
 
“The only mechanism that’s out there right now—the Philippines is the one that advanced it—is arbitration. So we hope to be able to get the arbitration in place, that will be the goal line for all of us,” Del Rosario says.
 
Del Rosario is encouraging Indonesian Foreign Minister Marty Natalegawa to pursue his proposal for a meeting among the claimant states for discussion of the increasingly tense situation in the South China Sea.
 
He hopes the meeting could be held before the Association of Southeast Asian Nations (Asean) Regional Forum in Burma (Myanmar) in August and that he would be “honored to host” the claimants’ meeting.
 
Del Rosario said the meeting would be an appropriate place to raise his proposed moratorium on “provocative activities” in the South China Sea, an echo of a suggestion from Daniel Russel, the top US diplomat in Asia, who had been speaking about a freeze on activities that stir up tensions pending the conclusion of a binding code of conduct among the claimants.
 
China insists on bilateral negotiations with individual claimants as it continues to develop territory in the sea where islands, islets, atolls and reefs are believed to be sitting on vast oil and gas reserves.
 
China is reclaiming land on strategic reefs within Philippine territory in the Spratly archipelago, including Mabini (Johnson South) Reef, the two Gavin (Gaven) reefs and Calderon (Cuarteron) Reef.
 
Both the Philippine Air Force and the Philippine Navy, through the Naval Air Group, conduct aerial patrols in the West Philippine Sea.
 
Aerial surveillance photographs show a Chinese dredging vessel anchored on Mabini Reef and what appeared to be reclaimed land that it was feared could be used to build an airstrip within Philippine territory.
 
The Philippines has protested China’s moves in the West Philippine Sea but Beijing has rejected the protests, insisting it has “undisputed sovereignty” over the South China Sea.
 
***
 
China has published a new map of the entire country including the islands in the South China Sea (West Philippine Sea) in order to “better show” its territorial claim over the region.
 
The government-run Xinhua news agency of China published photos of the map made by Hunan Map Publishing House and said in the caption “Islands in South China Sea share the same scale with mainland and are better shown than in traditional maps.”
 
The map shows China’s claim over the South China Sea by marking ten dash lines around the region just off the coasts of Vietnam, Malaysia, Brunei, and the Philippines’ islands of Palawan and Luzon.
 
China’s claim over the region has been challenged by the Philippines before the International Tribunal on the Law of the Sea (Itlos).
 
Supreme Court Associate Justice Antonio Carpio debunked China’s historical claims in public lectures saying that “There is not a single ancient map, whether made by Chinese or foreigners, showing that the Spratlys and Scarborough Shoal were ever part of Chinese territory.”
 
“China’s so-called historical facts to justify its nine-dash line are glaringly inconsistent with actual historical facts, based on China’s own historical maps, constitutions and official pronouncements,” Carpio said.
 
China remains in control of large parts of the South China Sea and Chinese maritime security vessels have repeatedly used water cannons to drive away Filipino fishermen from Scarborough Shoal and from areas in the Spratly Islands.
 
Most reports on what has been going on in the South China Sea (West Philippine Sea) note that there could be gas or oil under these seas. I don’t think that matters. The reason why China is claiming our maritime waters is not for what is under the seas but for territory. By taking most of the territorial waters from weak ASEAN nations whose best interest for survival is allowing China to stretch its boundaries, China would have stretched its defense perimeter against possible invasion by its Western military competitors.
 
***
 
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