May 23, 2018, 1:25 pm
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1 Philippine Peso = 0.07022 UAE Dirham
1 Philippine Peso = 2.04971 Albanian Lek
1 Philippine Peso = 0.03427 Neth Antilles Guilder
1 Philippine Peso = 0.46553 Argentine Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 0.02521 Australian Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.03403 Aruba Florin
1 Philippine Peso = 0.03824 Barbados Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 1.6174 Bangladesh Taka
1 Philippine Peso = 0.0318 Bulgarian Lev
1 Philippine Peso = 0.00722 Bahraini Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 33.47954 Burundi Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01912 Bermuda Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.02536 Brunei Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.13117 Bolivian Boliviano
1 Philippine Peso = 0.07028 Brazilian Real
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01912 Bahamian Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 1.30067 Bhutan Ngultrum
1 Philippine Peso = 0.19226 Botswana Pula
1 Philippine Peso = 382.79159 Belarus Ruble
1 Philippine Peso = 0.0382 Belize Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.02445 Canadian Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01907 Swiss Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 12.17151 Chilean Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 0.12202 Chinese Yuan
1 Philippine Peso = 54.9522 Colombian Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 10.70612 Costa Rica Colon
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01912 Cuban Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 1.78834 Cape Verde Escudo
1 Philippine Peso = 0.41644 Czech Koruna
1 Philippine Peso = 3.3891 Djibouti Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 0.12076 Danish Krone
1 Philippine Peso = 0.94646 Dominican Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 2.21398 Algerian Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.25367 Estonian Kroon
1 Philippine Peso = 0.34149 Egyptian Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 0.52008 Ethiopian Birr
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01621 Euro
1 Philippine Peso = 0.03927 Fiji Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01423 Falkland Islands Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01423 British Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 0.08859 Ghanaian Cedi
1 Philippine Peso = 0.89503 Gambian Dalasi
1 Philippine Peso = 172.06501 Guinea Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 0.14027 Guatemala Quetzal
1 Philippine Peso = 3.93289 Guyana Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.15004 Hong Kong Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.45428 Honduras Lempira
1 Philippine Peso = 0.11999 Croatian Kuna
1 Philippine Peso = 1.19751 Haiti Gourde
1 Philippine Peso = 5.1499 Hungarian Forint
1 Philippine Peso = 271.08987 Indonesian Rupiah
1 Philippine Peso = 0.06827 Israeli Shekel
1 Philippine Peso = 1.30228 Indian Rupee
1 Philippine Peso = 22.63862 Iraqi Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 804.0153 Iran Rial
1 Philippine Peso = 1.99809 Iceland Krona
1 Philippine Peso = 2.38145 Jamaican Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.0135 Jordanian Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 2.12293 Japanese Yen
1 Philippine Peso = 1.91587 Kenyan Shilling
1 Philippine Peso = 1.30863 Kyrgyzstan Som
1 Philippine Peso = 77.2065 Cambodia Riel
1 Philippine Peso = 7.91109 Comoros Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 17.20841 North Korean Won
1 Philippine Peso = 20.57725 Korean Won
1 Philippine Peso = 0.00577 Kuwaiti Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01568 Cayman Islands Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 6.29369 Kazakhstan Tenge
1 Philippine Peso = 159.08222 Lao Kip
1 Philippine Peso = 28.77629 Lebanese Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 3.0153 Sri Lanka Rupee
1 Philippine Peso = 2.55793 Liberian Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.24207 Lesotho Loti
1 Philippine Peso = 0.05829 Lithuanian Lita
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01187 Latvian Lat
1 Philippine Peso = 0.02595 Libyan Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.18017 Moroccan Dirham
1 Philippine Peso = 0.31807 Moldovan Leu
1 Philippine Peso = 0.99293 Macedonian Denar
1 Philippine Peso = 25.85086 Myanmar Kyat
1 Philippine Peso = 45.83174 Mongolian Tugrik
1 Philippine Peso = 0.15455 Macau Pataca
1 Philippine Peso = 6.76864 Mauritania Ougulya
1 Philippine Peso = 0.65679 Mauritius Rupee
1 Philippine Peso = 0.29771 Maldives Rufiyaa
1 Philippine Peso = 13.64149 Malawi Kwacha
1 Philippine Peso = 0.37878 Mexican Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 0.07606 Malaysian Ringgit
1 Philippine Peso = 0.24208 Namibian Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 6.88337 Nigerian Naira
1 Philippine Peso = 0.59598 Nicaragua Cordoba
1 Philippine Peso = 0.15388 Norwegian Krone
1 Philippine Peso = 2.08185 Nepalese Rupee
1 Philippine Peso = 0.02752 New Zealand Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.00735 Omani Rial
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01912 Panama Balboa
1 Philippine Peso = 0.0627 Peruvian Nuevo Sol
1 Philippine Peso = 0.06117 Papua New Guinea Kina
1 Philippine Peso = 1 Philippine Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 2.20841 Pakistani Rupee
1 Philippine Peso = 0.06955 Polish Zloty
1 Philippine Peso = 107.60994 Paraguayan Guarani
1 Philippine Peso = 0.06959 Qatar Rial
1 Philippine Peso = 0.07495 Romanian New Leu
1 Philippine Peso = 1.17737 Russian Rouble
1 Philippine Peso = 16.18375 Rwanda Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 0.0717 Saudi Arabian Riyal
1 Philippine Peso = 0.15039 Solomon Islands Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.26023 Seychelles Rupee
1 Philippine Peso = 0.34331 Sudanese Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 0.16581 Swedish Krona
1 Philippine Peso = 0.02562 Singapore Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01424 St Helena Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 0.42459 Slovak Koruna
1 Philippine Peso = 149.13958 Sierra Leone Leone
1 Philippine Peso = 10.7457 Somali Shilling
1 Philippine Peso = 397.36138 Sao Tome Dobra
1 Philippine Peso = 0.1673 El Salvador Colon
1 Philippine Peso = 9.84665 Syrian Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 0.24215 Swaziland Lilageni
1 Philippine Peso = 0.61434 Thai Baht
1 Philippine Peso = 0.04906 Tunisian Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.04426 Tongan paʻanga
1 Philippine Peso = 0.08746 Turkish Lira
1 Philippine Peso = 0.12714 Trinidad Tobago Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.57119 Taiwan Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 43.51816 Tanzanian Shilling
1 Philippine Peso = 0.49847 Ukraine Hryvnia
1 Philippine Peso = 71.12811 Ugandan Shilling
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01912 United States Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.59981 Uruguayan New Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 152.58126 Uzbekistan Sum
1 Philippine Peso = 1501.96941 Venezuelan Bolivar
1 Philippine Peso = 435.35373 Vietnam Dong
1 Philippine Peso = 2.08088 Vanuatu Vatu
1 Philippine Peso = 0.0494 Samoa Tala
1 Philippine Peso = 10.62849 CFA Franc (BEAC)
1 Philippine Peso = 0.05163 East Caribbean Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 10.62849 CFA Franc (BCEAO)
1 Philippine Peso = 1.92218 Pacific Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 4.7782 Yemen Riyal
1 Philippine Peso = 0.24216 South African Rand
1 Philippine Peso = 99.22562 Zambian Kwacha
1 Philippine Peso = 6.91969 Zimbabwe dollar

Cayetano as DFA Secretary

THE second deadliest country in the world in 2016, according to a CNN report, was Mexico. I wouldn’t be surprised if she still is today.
Yet she has largely escaped the attention of the government of her neighbor to the north and the biggest market for her drug cartels, the United States. According to the US Department of Justice, the Mexican drug cartels send between $19 billion and $29 billion back to Mexico from the US. My, that’s a lot!
CNN also says Mexico’s drug wars claimed 23,000 lives in 2016 – second only to Syria where 50,000 people died as a result of the ongoing civil war in that country.
Yet this gruesome fact hardly made the headlines in the US and other Western media, nor did it catch the attention of the UN, the European Union and sundry organizations like the Amnesty International and Human Rights Watch.
In contrast, the attention we get mainly from Western governments and media, the UN and EU certainly appears unwarranted when we consider the number of the assumed drug-related deaths in the Philippines which is less than one-third of those in Mexico.
Without a doubt, we would not be getting all this attention were it not for the apparent vilification campaign led, or encouraged, by Washington and the US media. 
Let’s not even talk about the local mainstream media owned by oligarchs who are not happy with the policies of President Rodrigo Roa Duterte aka Digong.
And, of course, we should not discount the US lackeys in our midst who have for so long lorded over the country, many of them belonging to the elite and the oligarchy. The US loses influence, they lose influence. Simple.
*** 
So, why the campaign obviously being waged to discredit or derail Digong?
We have always been considered the linchpin of US influence in the Southeast Asian region. As such, we were supposed to remain loyal and subservient to her. 
But not anymore!
With the shift to an independent foreign policy as mandated by the Constitution no less, Digong has, unlike all his predecessors, seen the correctness and advantages of being friends to all who would be friends with us, particularly the big powers.
Digong’s detractors need only look at the benefits the country has so far derived from that policy: $24 billion in investments, loans and grants from China and building of two bridges for free across the Pasig River; offers of military assistance and enhanced trade relations with Russia; building of a subway system in Metro Manila by Japan; ships from Japan and South Korea; among others.
But perhaps even more important than the material benefits are the respect and admiration that the country has earned due to Digong’s policies. 
Witness, for instance, how the leaders of the two most powerful nations in the world, China President Xi Jinping and US President Donald Trump, now regard the President of our Republic, Digong. They phoned him. Unprecedented.
As I said in my last column, I’d rather not speculate on the reasons the two leaders called Digong, what they told him or asked him to do. 
Suffice it to say that both Xi and Trump consider Digong important enough to talk with or consult on whatever it was they had in mind. 

ACTING FOREIGN
SECRETARY MANALO 

As a former career foreign service officer, I am naturally partial to having a qualified career officer to head the DFA. (I was ambassador to Bangladesh, Austria, Croatia, Slovenia, Laos and Thailand; Deputy Permanent Representative to the UN and Alternate Representative to the Security Council in New York; Permanent Representative to the UN Office, IAEA and UNIDO in Vienna and ESCAP in Bangkok; assistant secretary for Press and Public Affairs, for Asean Affairs and for UN Affairs.) 
And so I was elated when Digong named Undersecretary Enrique Manalo as acting secretary to replace Perfecto Yasay, Jr. whose nomination as DFA head was rejected by the Commission on Appointments. 
And when Digong said, shortly after he named Manalo, that he needed Senator Alan Cayetano more in the Senate and then Cayetano himself said that the “situation has changed” insofar as his taking over the DFA was concerned, my hopes for a permanent appointment for Manalo were raised, especially after he proved himself quite capable in the short time he has been acting secretary. 
I am not saying Cayetano will not do a good job as foreign secretary given his lack of experience in the field of diplomacy. As Digong said, he is brilliant and I’m confident he will learn his new job quickly enough, especially as he will be backed up by dedicated and competent professional DFA officers and staff. 
I was also happy to hear him say he will not engage in “microphone diplomacy”. He does tend to perorate at times, even “lecture”, when making a point or replying to queries. 
Too, hogging the microphone in diplomacy is a no-no. If you do that, audiences will begin to listen to you less. 
Cayetano should be able to articulate and implement Digong’s foreign policy with fewer words. I wish him all the best. 

EX-PRESIDENT
NOYNOY AQUINO 

Aquino said he was not an “accountable officer” and was, therefore, not liable for the illegal Disbursement Acceleration Program (DAP). 
That was his major problem. He has no clue as to what “command responsibility” means. He has no sense of accountability at all. That is how he earned the moniker “Boy Sisi”. 
He approved the DAP. Surely, he must have also approved or at least known about the alleged payment of bribes to senators and congressmen taken from the DAP to impeach the late Chief Justice Renato Corona. 
He claims he is not corrupt. But everyone knows he tolerated the rampant corruption that his minions were committing during his watch. That made him no different from them. 
Even the gargantuan illegal drug problem we now face may be attributed to his evident lack of concern and empathy for the hoi polloi. He is an oligarch. 
*** 
Today is the 18th day of the eleventh year of the enforced disappearance of Jonas Burgos, son of the late press icon and founder of this newspaper.
The family and friends of Jonas hope that the Duterte administration will exert serious efforts to find and haul the perpetrators of Jonas’ disappearance to justice.
*** 
From an internet friend: 
HILARIOUS QUOTES: 
= To succeed in life, you need a wishbone, a backbone and a funny bone.
= Behind every great man is a woman rolling her eyes.
= We are all here on earth to help others. What on earth the others are here for, I don’t know.
= Wine is constant proof that God loves us and loves to see us happy.
= Age is something that doesn’t matter, unless you are a cheese.
= Why do they call it rush hour when nothing moves.
= Laugh and the world laughs with you, snore and you sleep alone.
= They say marriages are made in Heaven, but so are thunder and lightning. 
*** 
FB: https://www.facebook.com/reynaldo.arcilla.9847
 
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Column of the Day

How polluted is that estero near you?

Dahli Aspillera's picture
By DAHLI ASPILLERA | May 23,2018
‘Think recycled water. Modern cities have been using water for non-potable needs, recycled from rivers and rain catchments. In London, such water is referred to as Grey Water.’

Opinion of the Day

Is Duterte China’s accomplice in SCS military plans?

Ellen Tordesillas's picture
By ELLEN TORDESILLAS | May 23, 2018
‘But what is more disturbing is what Duterte revealed he knew about China’s nuclear weapons in Philippine territory all along.’