June 25, 2018, 1:27 pm
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1 Philippine Peso = 0.06901 UAE Dirham
1 Philippine Peso = 2.02912 Albanian Lek
1 Philippine Peso = 0.03401 Neth Antilles Guilder
1 Philippine Peso = 0.5072 Argentine Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 0.02524 Australian Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.03345 Aruba Florin
1 Philippine Peso = 0.03758 Barbados Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 1.57159 Bangladesh Taka
1 Philippine Peso = 0.03155 Bulgarian Lev
1 Philippine Peso = 0.00712 Bahraini Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 32.90079 Burundi Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01879 Bermuda Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.02526 Brunei Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.1289 Bolivian Boliviano
1 Philippine Peso = 0.07111 Brazilian Real
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01879 Bahamian Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 1.28053 Bhutan Ngultrum
1 Philippine Peso = 0.19402 Botswana Pula
1 Philippine Peso = 376.17437 Belarus Ruble
1 Philippine Peso = 0.03754 Belize Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.02493 Canadian Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01856 Swiss Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 11.99061 Chilean Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 0.12218 Chinese Yuan
1 Philippine Peso = 54.75385 Colombian Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 10.57591 Costa Rica Colon
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01879 Cuban Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 1.77772 Cape Verde Escudo
1 Philippine Peso = 0.41526 Czech Koruna
1 Philippine Peso = 3.33615 Djibouti Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 0.12016 Danish Krone
1 Philippine Peso = 0.92728 Dominican Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 2.1963 Algerian Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.25225 Estonian Kroon
1 Philippine Peso = 0.33484 Egyptian Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 0.51146 Ethiopian Birr
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01612 Euro
1 Philippine Peso = 0.03918 Fiji Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01416 Falkland Islands Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01417 British Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 0.08979 Ghanaian Cedi
1 Philippine Peso = 0.87956 Gambian Dalasi
1 Philippine Peso = 169.07178 Guinea Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 0.14072 Guatemala Quetzal
1 Philippine Peso = 3.87599 Guyana Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.14741 Hong Kong Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.44878 Honduras Lempira
1 Philippine Peso = 0.11882 Croatian Kuna
1 Philippine Peso = 1.24803 Haiti Gourde
1 Philippine Peso = 5.23224 Hungarian Forint
1 Philippine Peso = 264.43067 Indonesian Rupiah
1 Philippine Peso = 0.06764 Israeli Shekel
1 Philippine Peso = 1.27568 Indian Rupee
1 Philippine Peso = 22.24728 Iraqi Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 798.38407 Iran Rial
1 Philippine Peso = 2.03119 Iceland Krona
1 Philippine Peso = 2.45509 Jamaican Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01333 Jordanian Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 2.06417 Japanese Yen
1 Philippine Peso = 1.89121 Kenyan Shilling
1 Philippine Peso = 1.28183 Kyrgyzstan Som
1 Philippine Peso = 76.00526 Cambodia Riel
1 Philippine Peso = 7.92522 Comoros Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 16.91094 North Korean Won
1 Philippine Peso = 20.86622 Korean Won
1 Philippine Peso = 0.00568 Kuwaiti Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01541 Cayman Islands Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 6.38595 Kazakhstan Tenge
1 Philippine Peso = 158.00451 Lao Kip
1 Philippine Peso = 28.292 Lebanese Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 2.98572 Sri Lanka Rupee
1 Philippine Peso = 2.74709 Liberian Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.25254 Lesotho Loti
1 Philippine Peso = 0.05728 Lithuanian Lita
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01166 Latvian Lat
1 Philippine Peso = 0.02548 Libyan Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.1786 Moroccan Dirham
1 Philippine Peso = 0.3177 Moldovan Leu
1 Philippine Peso = 0.98891 Macedonian Denar
1 Philippine Peso = 25.98647 Myanmar Kyat
1 Philippine Peso = 45.97896 Mongolian Tugrik
1 Philippine Peso = 0.15183 Macau Pataca
1 Philippine Peso = 6.67042 Mauritania Ougulya
1 Philippine Peso = 0.65295 Mauritius Rupee
1 Philippine Peso = 0.29256 Maldives Rufiyaa
1 Philippine Peso = 13.4053 Malawi Kwacha
1 Philippine Peso = 0.37584 Mexican Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 0.07518 Malaysian Ringgit
1 Philippine Peso = 0.25239 Namibian Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 6.72679 Nigerian Naira
1 Philippine Peso = 0.59207 Nicaragua Cordoba
1 Philippine Peso = 0.15205 Norwegian Krone
1 Philippine Peso = 2.03401 Nepalese Rupee
1 Philippine Peso = 0.02719 New Zealand Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.00723 Omani Rial
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01879 Panama Balboa
1 Philippine Peso = 0.06134 Peruvian Nuevo Sol
1 Philippine Peso = 0.0609 Papua New Guinea Kina
1 Philippine Peso = 1 Philippine Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 2.28222 Pakistani Rupee
1 Philippine Peso = 0.06966 Polish Zloty
1 Philippine Peso = 106.55769 Paraguayan Guarani
1 Philippine Peso = 0.06839 Qatar Rial
1 Philippine Peso = 0.07509 Romanian New Leu
1 Philippine Peso = 1.18236 Russian Rouble
1 Philippine Peso = 15.96073 Rwanda Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 0.07046 Saudi Arabian Riyal
1 Philippine Peso = 0.1479 Solomon Islands Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.25235 Seychelles Rupee
1 Philippine Peso = 0.33738 Sudanese Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 0.16635 Swedish Krona
1 Philippine Peso = 0.02551 Singapore Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01417 St Helena Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 0.41725 Slovak Koruna
1 Philippine Peso = 149.94363 Sierra Leone Leone
1 Philippine Peso = 10.72905 Somali Shilling
1 Philippine Peso = 394.98309 Sao Tome Dobra
1 Philippine Peso = 0.16441 El Salvador Colon
1 Philippine Peso = 9.67644 Syrian Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 0.25202 Swaziland Lilageni
1 Philippine Peso = 0.61856 Thai Baht
1 Philippine Peso = 0.04882 Tunisian Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.04333 Tongan paʻanga
1 Philippine Peso = 0.08786 Turkish Lira
1 Philippine Peso = 0.12682 Trinidad Tobago Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.56924 Taiwan Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 42.63435 Tanzanian Shilling
1 Philippine Peso = 0.49267 Ukraine Hryvnia
1 Philippine Peso = 72.51597 Ugandan Shilling
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01879 United States Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.59451 Uruguayan New Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 147.50094 Uzbekistan Sum
1 Philippine Peso = 1499.4363 Venezuelan Bolivar
1 Philippine Peso = 430.10147 Vietnam Dong
1 Philippine Peso = 2.07159 Vanuatu Vatu
1 Philippine Peso = 0.0488 Samoa Tala
1 Philippine Peso = 10.56614 CFA Franc (BEAC)
1 Philippine Peso = 0.05073 East Caribbean Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 10.56614 CFA Franc (BCEAO)
1 Philippine Peso = 1.92165 Pacific Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 4.69466 Yemen Riyal
1 Philippine Peso = 0.25241 South African Rand
1 Philippine Peso = 97.51033 Zambian Kwacha
1 Philippine Peso = 6.80008 Zimbabwe dollar

Canadian waste

I WATCHED and listened to the entire arrival statement and press conference of President Rodrigo Roa Duterte aka Digong when he returned from the Asia Pacific Economic Cooperation Summit held in Vietnam last week.
For 1 hour and 16 minutes, Digong did not utter a single cuss word. And it was not because of the absence of questions asked that usually triggers emotional outbursts from him, particularly those on illegal drugs and interference of other countries in our domestic affairs.
There were brief moments in his responses when he looked like he was about to utter his favorite expletive. But none came.
My humble compliments, Mr. President. It must have taken a lot of conscious effort on your part to resist the powerful urge to cuss during those moments. 

CANADIAN WASTE 
I am glad that environmental advocates led by activist priest Robert Reyes have raised at this time the issue of the Canadian waste dumped in the Philippines several years ago. 
I have written about the matter a couple of times in the past. The last time was when it was brought up during the APEC Summit held here two years ago. Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau promised to look into the matter and come up with what he called a “Canadian solution”. 
That was two years ago, mind you, and nothing has happened since.
I think it behooves our officials to raise the matter again with Trudeau. Thereafter, the Department of Foreign Affairs should keep following up the matter with the Canadian Embassy here and our Embassy in Ottawa. 
Given the lack of appropriate action on Canada’s part in the last two years, it is not farfetched that she will continue to sidestep the issue. That being the case, I’d like to reiterate the alternative solution I previously suggested – send back the 100 containers to Canada or dump them in international waters, put the blame on Canada’s inaction and call it the “Canadian solution”.
The Department of Environment and Natural Resources reportedly said that the Canadian waste is “strictly prohibited to be exported and is classified as Waste No. Y46 listed in Annex II of the Basel Convention on the Control of Transboundary Movement of Hazardous Wastes and Their Disposal.”
(NOTE: I hope someone from the Philippine Delegation reads this piece this morning. There may still be time to raise the matter with Trudeau before he leaves.)

NOYNOY’S MAMASAPANO CASE
The mainstream media had a field day writing about Digong agreeing with Senator Antonio Trillanes’ view that the case filed before the Sandiganbayan against ex-President Noynoy Aquino will not prosper.
The impression that one gets from the reports is that the two agree with the Ombudsman’s decision to charge Noynoy with only graft and usurpation of authority.
I do not believe that that is the case. I think Digong agrees with Trillanes only insofar as the weakness of the charge is concerned. Both agree that a President has the inherent authority to issue orders to the Armed Forces and the PNP. Therefore, there could not have been a usurpation of authority.
I think Digong’s position is that it was the wrong charge. He is worried Noynoy will be acquitted and altogether escape responsibility for the Mamasapano Massacre of the SAF 44.
In contrast, Trillanes’ position is confined merely to the weakness of the charge and gives the impression he would be happy if Noynoy were acquitted.
Another NoynoYellow supporter, Senator Joel Villanueva who is not a lawyer, said the charges against Noynoy are “legally inappropriate”. 
Does he mean the Ombudsman made a mistake? If so, he’s right. They were the wrong charges in that they obviously are meant to make Noynoy get off the hook. 
In this regard, it will be recalled that the Senate hearings conducted on the Massacre by the Senate committee chaired by Senator Grace Poe and the probe conducted by the PNP panel headed by retired General Benjamin Magalong both concluded that Noynoy was responsible for the tragedy. 
***
Noynoy-appointed Ombudsman, Conchita Carpio Morales, decided to file the lesser charges of graft and usurpation of official function against her benefactor in the Sandiganbayan in an obvious attempt to shield Noynoy from a harsher verdict.
“We say again that the said charges are designed to fail—in order to inoculate President Aquino against the graver charge of mass homicide which could possibly put him behind bars for the rest of his life,” said Ferdinand Topacio, legal counsel of the Volunteers Against Crime and Corruption (VACC).
The VACC wants reckless imprudence resulting in multiple homicide as one of the possible charges against Aquino for the deaths of the SAF44. 

PDAF AND DAP
The Department of Justice has started its reinvestigation on the multibillion-peso Priority Development Assistance Fund (PDAF).
I think the DOJ should include in its investigation the alleged bribe given to all the incumbent senators, except three, at the time of the impeachment trial of the late Supreme Court Chief Justice Renato Corona. The bribe money was sourced from the illegally declared Disbursement Acceleration Program (DAP) concocted by Noynoy and his erstwhile budget secretary Florencio Abad.
According to reports, Senator Franklin Drilon allegedly received the biggest amount (P100 million) followed by Senator Chiz Escudero (P99 million). The rest received P50 million each. Some congressmen also allegedly received varying amounts sourced from the DAP for voting to impeach Corona.
The alleged bribe recipients should all be made to account for the money they got. Otherwise, they should be charged in accordance with the law. 
Naturally, the bribe giver should also be held accountable for the illegal act.
***
Today is the 194th day of the eleventh year of the enforced disappearance of Jonas Burgos, son of the late press icon and founder of this newspaper.
After the acquittal of Major Harry Baliaga Jr., the only person formally charged with Jonas’ kidnapping, I guess what happens next is now up to Divine Providence.
***
From an internet friend:
Two guys are out hiking. All of a sudden, a bear starts chasing them. 
They climb a tree, but the bear starts climbing up the tree after them. The first guy gets his sneakers out of his knapsack and starts putting them on. 
The second guy says, “What are you doing?” 
He says, “I figure when the bear gets close to us, we’ll jump down and make a run for it.” 
The second guy says, “Are you crazy? You can’t outrun a bear.” 
The first guy says, “I don’t have to outrun the bear. I only have to outrun you.” 
***
14 November 2017
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Column of the Day

Supply-side economics

Dahli Aspillera's picture
By DAHLI ASPILLERA | June 25,2018
‘The 15 percent of the world’s population living in the most prosperous 24 countries, consumed 74 percent of world’s output.’

Opinion of the Day

It takes a jacket

Jose Bayani Baylon's picture
By JOSE BAYANI BAYLON | June 25, 2018
‘The context made it worse.’