September 20, 2017, 7:13 pm
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1 Philippine Peso = 0.07179 UAE Dirham
1 Philippine Peso = 2.17553 Albanian Lek
1 Philippine Peso = 0.03474 Neth Antilles Guilder
1 Philippine Peso = 0.33168 Argentine Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 0.02434 Australian Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.03495 Aruba Florin
1 Philippine Peso = 0.03909 Barbados Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 1.57584 Bangladesh Taka
1 Philippine Peso = 0.03196 Bulgarian Lev
1 Philippine Peso = 0.00736 Bahraini Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 33.8794 Burundi Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01955 Bermuda Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.02626 Brunei Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.13468 Bolivian Boliviano
1 Philippine Peso = 0.06076 Brazilian Real
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01955 Bahamian Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 1.25293 Bhutan Ngultrum
1 Philippine Peso = 0.19814 Botswana Pula
1 Philippine Peso = 391.32134 Belarus Ruble
1 Philippine Peso = 0.03905 Belize Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.02381 Canadian Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01878 Swiss Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 12.19703 Chilean Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 0.12797 Chinese Yuan
1 Philippine Peso = 56.56763 Colombian Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 11.20407 Costa Rica Colon
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01955 Cuban Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 1.80414 Cape Verde Escudo
1 Philippine Peso = 0.42683 Czech Koruna
1 Philippine Peso = 3.47146 Djibouti Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 0.12175 Danish Krone
1 Philippine Peso = 0.92005 Dominican Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 2.16386 Algerian Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.25592 Estonian Kroon
1 Philippine Peso = 0.3448 Egyptian Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 0.45563 Ethiopian Birr
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01636 Euro
1 Philippine Peso = 0.0398 Fiji Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.0144 Falkland Islands Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01438 British Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 0.08637 Ghanaian Cedi
1 Philippine Peso = 0.87373 Gambian Dalasi
1 Philippine Peso = 174.19859 Guinea Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 0.14252 Guatemala Quetzal
1 Philippine Peso = 3.99648 Guyana Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.15278 Hong Kong Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.45582 Honduras Lempira
1 Philippine Peso = 0.12205 Croatian Kuna
1 Philippine Peso = 1.20133 Haiti Gourde
1 Philippine Peso = 5.05786 Hungarian Forint
1 Philippine Peso = 258.65911 Indonesian Rupiah
1 Philippine Peso = 0.06872 Israeli Shekel
1 Philippine Peso = 1.25233 Indian Rupee
1 Philippine Peso = 22.81079 Iraqi Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 654.02658 Iran Rial
1 Philippine Peso = 2.07584 Iceland Krona
1 Philippine Peso = 2.54613 Jamaican Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01384 Jordanian Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 2.17369 Japanese Yen
1 Philippine Peso = 2.00743 Kenyan Shilling
1 Philippine Peso = 1.34064 Kyrgyzstan Som
1 Philippine Peso = 79.2025 Cambodia Riel
1 Philippine Peso = 8.08053 Comoros Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 17.59187 North Korean Won
1 Philippine Peso = 22.0045 Korean Won
1 Philippine Peso = 0.00588 Kuwaiti Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01603 Cayman Islands Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 6.62568 Kazakhstan Tenge
1 Philippine Peso = 161.53245 Lao Kip
1 Philippine Peso = 29.42533 Lebanese Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 2.98769 Sri Lanka Rupee
1 Philippine Peso = 2.27717 Liberian Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.25762 Lesotho Loti
1 Philippine Peso = 0.05959 Lithuanian Lita
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01213 Latvian Lat
1 Philippine Peso = 0.02655 Libyan Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.18266 Moroccan Dirham
1 Philippine Peso = 0.34275 Moldovan Leu
1 Philippine Peso = 1.00176 Macedonian Denar
1 Philippine Peso = 26.48554 Myanmar Kyat
1 Philippine Peso = 47.84988 Mongolian Tugrik
1 Philippine Peso = 0.15735 Macau Pataca
1 Philippine Peso = 7.05629 Mauritania Ougulya
1 Philippine Peso = 0.65031 Mauritius Rupee
1 Philippine Peso = 0.30336 Maldives Rufiyaa
1 Philippine Peso = 13.99922 Malawi Kwacha
1 Philippine Peso = 0.34428 Mexican Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 0.08176 Malaysian Ringgit
1 Philippine Peso = 0.25704 Namibian Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 6.88038 Nigerian Naira
1 Philippine Peso = 0.5933 Nicaragua Cordoba
1 Philippine Peso = 0.15326 Norwegian Krone
1 Philippine Peso = 1.99961 Nepalese Rupee
1 Philippine Peso = 0.02667 New Zealand Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.00752 Omani Rial
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01955 Panama Balboa
1 Philippine Peso = 0.06351 Peruvian Nuevo Sol
1 Philippine Peso = 0.06226 Papua New Guinea Kina
1 Philippine Peso = 1 Philippine Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 2.05629 Pakistani Rupee
1 Philippine Peso = 0.06996 Polish Zloty
1 Philippine Peso = 110.44762 Paraguayan Guarani
1 Philippine Peso = 0.07117 Qatar Rial
1 Philippine Peso = 0.07527 Romanian New Leu
1 Philippine Peso = 1.12619 Russian Rouble
1 Philippine Peso = 16.18804 Rwanda Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 0.0733 Saudi Arabian Riyal
1 Philippine Peso = 0.15296 Solomon Islands Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.26388 Seychelles Rupee
1 Philippine Peso = 0.13018 Sudanese Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 0.15555 Swedish Krona
1 Philippine Peso = 0.02627 Singapore Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.0144 St Helena Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 0.43405 Slovak Koruna
1 Philippine Peso = 146.59891 Sierra Leone Leone
1 Philippine Peso = 10.88741 Somali Shilling
1 Philippine Peso = 400.87765 Sao Tome Dobra
1 Philippine Peso = 0.17103 El Salvador Colon
1 Philippine Peso = 10.06607 Syrian Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 0.25709 Swaziland Lilageni
1 Philippine Peso = 0.64621 Thai Baht
1 Philippine Peso = 0.04766 Tunisian Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.04368 Tongan paʻanga
1 Philippine Peso = 0.06714 Turkish Lira
1 Philippine Peso = 0.13149 Trinidad Tobago Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.58751 Taiwan Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 43.66693 Tanzanian Shilling
1 Philippine Peso = 0.51173 Ukraine Hryvnia
1 Philippine Peso = 70.19156 Ugandan Shilling
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01955 United States Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.56626 Uruguayan New Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 157.93589 Uzbekistan Sum
1 Philippine Peso = 0.19498 Venezuelan Bolivar
1 Philippine Peso = 444.15559 Vietnam Dong
1 Philippine Peso = 2.06353 Vanuatu Vatu
1 Philippine Peso = 0.04908 Samoa Tala
1 Philippine Peso = 10.72635 CFA Franc (BEAC)
1 Philippine Peso = 0.05278 East Caribbean Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 10.62119 CFA Franc (BCEAO)
1 Philippine Peso = 1.9398 Pacific Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 4.88468 Yemen Riyal
1 Philippine Peso = 0.25718 South African Rand
1 Philippine Peso = 101.43667 Zambian Kwacha
1 Philippine Peso = 7.07389 Zimbabwe dollar

Butt out!

THE fiery, feisty and combative President Rodrigo Roa Duterte aka Digong, when it comes to talking about the US treatment of the Philippines, both in the past and at present, suddenly became the “humble” friend in Southeast Asia of the US when he met US Secretary of State Rex Tillerson.
Quite expectedly, the US worshipers in our midst, including some who have been appointed by Digong to important government positions, wittingly or unwittingly, gleefully praised his statement as a sign he is a BFF (Best Friend Forever) of the US come hell or high water, right or wrong, so to speak.
How naïve of these people to think that way. Digong is smarter and has more depth than they take him for. At least, that’s what I think… for now.

US DRUG PROBLEM

Buried under the headlines created by US President Donald Trump’s ranting about “fire and fury” threat against North Korea and that the US is “locked and loaded” as the former readies its missiles, is Trump’s statement about the “opioid epidemic” in the US. Opioid is an opiumlike compound.
“The opioid crisis is an emergency, and I am saying, officially, right now, it is an emergency. It’s a national emergency. We’re going to spend a lot of time, a lot of effort and a lot of money on the opioid crisis. It is a serious problem the likes of which we have never had,” Trump said. 
According to a CNN report, from 2000 to 2015, more than 500,000 people died in the US of drug overdoses and opioids account for the majority of those. 
No wonder Trump once told Digong he understands the latter’s war against illicit drugs.

SENATOR LACSON

My God, I hate drugs!... My God, I hate corruption!… There will be no corruption in my administration… I will not tolerate even a “whiff” of corruption.” – Digong
These words, in all probability, were in the mind of Senator Panfilo Lacson when he asked Digong, “Aren’t you mad at the Bureau of Customs?”
 “Aren’t you mad at the BOC, Mr. President? That’s 605 kilograms (estimated P6.4 billion worth) of high grade meth that slipped out of the Customs zone under their noses,” Lacson said.
Lacson must have also been provoked to ask the question after Digong said BOC chief Nicanor Faeldon retains his confidence and will not fire him.
One thing that impresses me most about Digong is his keen sense of command responsibility. Recall, for instance, his oft-repeated statements about taking responsibility for the actions, legal that is, of his soldiers and policemen.
Shouldn’t Faeldon follow his leader’s example and simply resign? Out of delicadeza, if nothing else? And what about hiring several athletes for P50,000 a month with no terms of reference at all? Doesn’t that constitute a violation of something in the law books?

SENATOR GORDON

Senator Richard Gordon, on the other hand, urged the government to “pressure” China to crack down on syndicates that export narcotics to the country.
“We should pressure them. If you are really our friend, you should block smuggled drugs from your end. We should talk about the huge bulk of drugs entering our country,” he said.
To be fair, it is reported that Chinese intelligence did tip our authorities about the drug shipment.
According to ABS-CBN News, Gordon, chair of the Senate Blue Ribbon Committee, asked the DFA last year to send a note verbale to Beijing after a Senate inquiry established that Chinese syndicates are behind two-thirds of the smuggled drug supply in the Philippines.
The DFA should make a follow-up on the matter.

FOREIGN SECRETARY CAYETANO

He said it again, this time in unmistakable terms. 
Foreign Secretary Cayetano said no country had the right to tell the Philippines what to do with her territorial dispute with China.
He made the statement after Australia, Japan and the US jointly urged the Philippines and China to abide by the ruling of the Permanent Court of Arbitration (PCA) that invalidated Beijing’s nine-dash-line claim to the South China Sea. 
Incidentally, the PCA is NOT a United Nations agency as it is often erroneously referred to, but merely an official UN Observer.
Cayetano said:
“We expect nations not to tell us what to do. They have their own foreign policy and interests. Japan, Australia, and the US are our friends. The US is our treaty ally. But we told countries around the world we are sovereign. We’ll decide what is good for us, we will decide what strategies are good for us because we are a sovereign nation. We respect their views but the… territorial dispute is between China and the Philippines. We are not pro-China, pro-US, pro-Japan, pro-whatever. We are pro-Philippines and pro-Asean because we were good friends with China, good friends with Japan, and good friends with the US and we appreciate not to be told what to do.”
(Essentially what I have been saying and writing in this space for years!)
So there… Bravo, Mr. Secretary.

RUSSIA-PH RELATIONS

Last week, Russian Foreign Minister Sergey Lavrov and Foreign Secretary Cayetano “agreed to fast track negotiations for pending bilateral agreements, particularly on military-technical cooperation, illegal narcotics, and law enforcement.” 
Cayetano thanked Lavrov for the Russian offer to send a cargo aircraft carrying relief assistance for displaced families in Marawi City. 
The two also reportedly discussed trade and investment, education and research and other areas of cooperation that their countries could explore. 
I guess it is now up to the agencies concerned to follow through on the matters discussed by the two ministers.

CASE VS. PRIETOS

Digong has been threatening to file charges against the Inquirer’s Prietos. 
This time, he said he will file a case of economic sabotage for their refusal to turn over to the government the Mile Long property in Makati.
“It is economic sabotage, iyon ang i-file ko (that I will file), no bail. Kita mo ‘yan sila diyan, kulong ‘yan (You will see, they will be jailed),” Digong said in a media briefing last week.
It has been a while, since Digong said he would file appropriate charges against the Prietos. I’m sorry to say, but I won’t believe it until I see it, or some kind of settlement is reached on the case. 
And what about the case he was supposed to file against ABS-CBN?
*** 
Today is the 109th day of the eleventh year of the enforced disappearance of Jonas Burgos, son of the late press icon and founder of this newspaper.

The family and friends of Jonas hope that the Duterte administration will exert serious efforts to find and haul the perpetrators of Jonas’ disappearance to justice.
*** 
From an internet friend:
Three contractors are bidding to fix a broken fence at the White House in DC. 
One from New Jersey, another from Tennessee and the third, Florida. They go with a White House official to examine the fence. 
The Florida contractor takes out a tape measure and does some measuring, then works some figures with a pencil. “Well,” he says, “I figure the job will run about $900: $400 for materials, $400 for my crew and $100 profit for me.” 
The Tennessee contractor also does some measuring and figuring, then says, I can do this job for $700: $300 for materials, $300 for my crew and $100 profit for me.” 
The New Jersey contractor doesn’t measure or figure, but leans over to the White House official and whispers, “$2,700.” 
The official, incredulous, says, “You didn’t even measure like the other guys! How did you come up with such a high figure?” 
The New Jersey contractor whispers back, “$1,000 for me, $1,000 for you, and we hire the guy from Tennessee to fix the fence.” 
“Done!” replies the government official.
*** 
https://www.facebook.com/reynaldo.arcilla.9847
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